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Public Document 



No. 48 



Cfte Commontoealtf) of spassacfmsetts 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION 



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FOR THE YEAR 1920 



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BOSTON 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 

32 DERNE STREET 



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Publication of this Document 

.'._'; / '. ! AfPjU^ED -BY "'DHp • \ .\ \ ' • !* j 

• Supervisor* dp -ADM^N^sTRATfON. ■ « • 



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CONTENTS. 



I. Organization and Administration, 

Commission, Officers and Employees, 
Offices, ..... 
II. General Financial Statement, 

III. General Policy of Commission, 

IV. Financial Statement, . 

Water Works, 

(1) Water Loans, Receipts and Payments, 

(2) Total Water Debt, December 31, 1920, 

(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, December 31, 1920 

(4) Water Assessment, 1920, 

(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of District and to Water Companies, 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, .... 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act, 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, .... 
(6) Receipts, ........ 

(c) Assets, ........ 

(d) Liabilities, ........ 

Sewerage Works, ......... 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments, 

North Metropolitan System, ..... 

South Metropolitan System, ..... 

(2) Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1920, 

North Metropolitan System, ..... 

South Metropolitan System, ..... 

(3) North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, December 31 

(4) Sewer Assessments, 1920, 

(5) Expenditures for the Different Works, 

(6) Detailed Financial Statement, 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 
(6) Receipts, 

(c) Assets, 

(d) Liabilities, . 

V. Other Reports, .... 
Report of Director of Parks, 
Report of Director of Park Engineering, 

Parkways, ..... 

Reservations, .... 

Drawbridges and Locks, 

General, ..... 
Data relating to Metropolitan Park System, 
Financial Statement, Parks Division, . 

Loan Appropriations, . 

Expenditures to December 1, 1920, 

Detailed Statement, 

Metropolitan Parks System, Maintenance, 

Metropolitan Parks System, Expense Fund, 

Summary of Expenditures, . 



, 1920, 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



2, Ashland, Hopkinton 



and 



Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Water Division, 

Organization, ......... 

Construction, ......... 

Meters and Connections, ...... 

Northern Extra High-service 16-inch Pipe Line for Lexington, 
Southern Extra High-service 12-inch Pipe Line for Hyde Park and Milton, 
New Work authorized during 1920, 
Maintenance, .... 

Rainfall and Yield of Watersheds, 
Storage Reservoirs, 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 
voirs, 

Farm Pond, . 

Lake Cochituate, 
Aqueducts, .... 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct, . 

Cochituate Aqueduct, 
Protection of the Water Supply, 

Sanitary Inspection, 

Filtration and Chlorination, 

Improvement of Swamps and Brooks 

Purchase of Land, . 
Clinton Sewage-disposal Works, 
Forestry, .... 

Wachusett Lands, . 

Sudbury and Cochituate Lands 

Distribution Reservoir Lands, 
Hydro-electric Service, . 

Wachusett Service, 

Sudbury Service, 
Distribution Pumping Service, 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations, 

Spot Pond Pumping Station, 

Arlington Pumping Station, 

Hyde Park Pumping Station, 
— Distribution Reservoirs, 

Weston Reservoir, . 

Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and Waban Hill Reservoirs 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs, 

Bellevue and Forbes Hill Reservoirs, 

Arlington and Mystic Reservoirs, 

Mystic Lake, Conduit and Pumping Station, 

Grounds at Arlington and Hyde Park Pumping Stations, 
Distribution Pipe Lines, 

Low-service Mains, 

Northern High-service Mains, . 

Southern High-service Mains, . 

Southern Extra High-service Pipe Lines, 

Pipe Bridges, ..... 

Pipe Yards, ..... 

Meters, Regulating Valves and Recording Pressure Gages, 

Breaks and Leaks, ...... t 

Emergency Pipe Line Service, .... 
Consumption of Water, ...... 

Installation of Meters on Service Pipes, 
Water Supplies Outside of Metropolitan Water District, 
Quality of the Water, ...... 

Engineering, ....... 



Whitehall 



CONTENTS. 



Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division, . 
Organization, ........ 

Obituary, . . . . . 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, ..... 

Areas and Populations, ...... 

Metropolitan Sewers, ....... 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections, 
Construction, . . . . . . 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System, 

Reading Extension, ..... 

Part of Section 76, Reading Extension, Inlet Sewer, Reservoir, etc., 
Section 75, Reading Extension, 
South Metropolitan Sewerage System, 

Wellesley Extension, ..... 

Part of Section 99, Trench and River Crossing, . 
Section 100, Wellesley Extension, 
Section 101, "Wellesley Extension, . • , 
Maintenance, . . . . . . . 

Scope of Work and Force employed, . . . 

Deer Island Pumping Station, .... 

Charlestown Pumping Station, 

Sewer Line Repairs, ..... 

Ward Street Pumping Station, 

Nut Island Screen-house and Yard, . 

Quincy Pumping Station, . ... 

Government Use of Old 24-inch Quincy Force Main, 
Gasolene in Public Sewers, .... 

Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works 
Stoneham, . . . . 

Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Sewage to Metropolitan 
erage System, .... 

North Metropolitan System, 
South Metropolitan System, 
Whole Metropolitan System, 
Pumping Stations, ...... 

Capacities and Results, .... 

North Metropolitan System, 

Deer Island Pumping Station, 
East Boston Pumping Station, 
Charlestown Pumping Station, 
Alewife Brook Pumping Station, . 
South Metropolitan System, 

Ward Street Pumping Station, 
Quincy Pumping Station, 
Nut Island Screen-house, 
Quincy Sewage Lifting Station, 
Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls, 
Materials intercepted at the Screens, 



in Winchester, Woburn and 
Sew 



PAGE 

145 
145 
146 
148 
148 
149 
149 
152 
152 
152 
153 
153 
154 
154 
155 
155 
156 
157 
.157 
157 
158 
158 
159 
159 
159 
160 
160 



Appendix No. 1. - 

Appendix No. 2. - 
Table No. 1 

Table No. 2 

Table No. 3 

Table No. 4 

Table No. 5 

Table No. 6 



- Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made and pending dur 

ing the Year 1920, 

- Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, 

— Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1920 

— Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1920, 
— ■ Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1920, . 

— Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1920, 

— Rainfall in Inches on the Wachusett Watershed, 1897-1920, 

— Rainfall in Inches on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875-1920, 



184 
189 

189 
190 
191 
192 
194 
195 



vi CONTENTS. 

Appendix No. 2 — Concluded. page 

Table No. 7. — Yield of the Wachusett Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile, 

1897-1920 197 

Table No. 8. — Yield of the Sudbury Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile, 

1875-1920, 199 

Table No. 9. — Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1920 203 

Table No. 10. — Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 

1920, 204 

Table No. 11. — Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1920, 205 

Table No. 12. — Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at 

the Beginning of Each Month, 206 

Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been drawn for 

the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District, ..... 207 
Table No. 14. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 1920 by 

Months, 208 

Table No. 15. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water by Districts in Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works in 1920, . . 209 

Table No. 16. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns 

supplied from Metropolitan Water Works in 1920, .... 210 
Table No. 17. — Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District, as constituted 

in the Year 1920, and a Small Section of the Town of Saugus, 1893-1920, 213 
Table No. 18. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, 216 
Table No. 19. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury Reservoir, . . 217 

Table No. 20. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stoneham, . . . 218 

Table No. 21. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate, . . . 219 

Table No. 22. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the State House, Boston, 220 
Table No. 23. — Averages of Chemical Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the 

Metropolitan Water Works in 1920, 221 

' Table No. 24. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 1892-1920, . 222 
Table No. 25. — Microscopic Organisms in Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works, 1898-1920, 223 

Table No. 26. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various Parts of 

the Metropolitan Water Works, 1898-1920 225 

Table No. 27. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works in 

1920 226 

Table No. 28. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1920, 227 

Table No. 29. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1920, 228 

Table No. 30. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works, Main Lines and Connections and 

Number of Valves set in Same, December 31, 1920, .... 229 
Table No. 31. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works, Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes, 

December 31, 1920, 230 

Table No. 32. — Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines and Connections and 

Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Several Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, December 31, 

1920 231 

Table No. 33. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Services metered, Fire Serv- 
ices, and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities and Towns supplied by the 

Metropolitan Water Works, December 31, 1920, . . . .232 

Table No. 34. — Elevation of the Hydraulic Grade Line in Feet above Boston City Base for 

each Month at Stations on the Metropolitan Water Works during 1920, 233 

Appendix No. 3. — Water Works Statistics for the Year 1920 235 

Appendix No. 4. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, made and pending 

during the Year 1920 238 

Appendix No. 5. — Financial Statement presented to the General Court on January 10, 1921, . 243 



Kepokt of the Metropolitan District Commission. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan District Commissioner has already presented 
to your Honorable Body an abstract of the account of the receipts, 
expenditures, disbursements and liabilities of the Water and Sewer- 
age Divisions for the fiscal year ending on November 30, 1920, and 
now presents a detailed statement of the doings of the Commission 
in the Parks Division for the fiscal year ending November 30, 1920, 
and in the Water and Sewerage Divisions for the calendar year end- 
ing December 31, 1920, being the 

FIRST ANNUAL REPORT. 
I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

Commission, Officers and Employees. 
The Metropolitan District Commission was constituted by the 
appointment of James A. Bailey as Commissioner, Ellerton P. Whit- 
ney, Frank A. Bayrd, Frank G. Hall and William H. Squire as 
Associate Commissioners. By chapter 350 of the General Acts of 
1919 all the powers, duties and responsibilities of the Metropolitan 
Park Commission and the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 
were transferred to this Commission on December 1, 1919. In ac- 
cordance with the provisions of section 126 of said chapter the 
Commissioner organized four divisions, namely, Parks, Park En- 
gineering, Water, Sewerage, and, with the approval of the Governor 
and Council, appointed as Director of Parks, Ellerton P. Whitney; 
Director of Park Engineering, John R. Rablin; Director of the 
Water Division, William E. Foss; Director of the Sewerage Di- 
vision, Frederick D. Smith. 



2 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

All directors of divisions served without extra compensation, re- 
ceiving only the salaries attached to the other positions which they 
held. 

The Commissioners appointed George Lyman Rogers secretary, 
William N. Davenport executive secretary, Alfred F. Bridgman pur- 
chasing agent; and the following chief engineers: of parks, John 
R. Rablin; water, William E. Foss; sewerage, Frederick D. Smith. 

Mary V. Habberley has continued as bookkeeper and financial 
secretary of the Parks Division, and Alice G. Mason as bookkeeper 
of the Water and Sewerage Divisions. Upon the resignation of 
W T illiam N. Davenport, after twenty-five years of faithful and ef- 
ficient service as secretary and executive secretary, May L. Powers 
was appointed financial secretary of the Water and Sewerage Di- 
visions. 

Herbert W. West has continued as superintendent of the Revere 
Beach Division and Charles River Division, Lower Basin; Elmer 
E. Bickford as superintendent of Nantasket Beach Division; Bar- 
tholomew J. Costello as superintendent of Blue Hills Division; John 
L. Gilman as superintendent of Charles River Upper Division; 
Albert N. Habberley as superintendent of Middlesex Fells Division. 

The organization of the Water and Sewerage Divisions is stated 
in detail in the accompanying reports of the directors of those 
divisions. 

The maximum number of employees during the year was 1,511, 
divided as follows: general offices, 32; parks, 924; water, 374; 
sewerage, 181. 

In this tabulation of employees the police are included under 
Parks, although considerable protection of the water system is given 
by the metropolitan district police. 

Offices. 

The principal office of the Commission is the suite of rooms on 
the third floor of the Kimball Building, 18 Tremont Street, occupied 
for many years by the Metropolitan Park Commission. The build- 
ings numbered 1 and 3 Ashburton Place, formerly used by the Met- 
ropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, still contain the main water 
and sewerage engineering offices, and the bookkeeping and clerical 
offices and laboratories of the Water and Sewerage Divisions. Al- 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 48. 3 

though the distance between these buildings is short, the present 
division of offices between two buildings is unsatisfactory, and 
constant but unsuccessful efforts have been made to obtain one 
home for all departments. As there is no available space in the 
State House, and adequate quarters elsewhere cannot be obtained, 
it seems wise to construct a suitable building in which the ad- 
ministrative, engineering and clerical offices may be concentrated, 
and the valuable plans and other property in charge of the Com- 
mission reasonably safeguarded. 

It seems probable that the activities of this Commission may be 
increased considerably in the years to come, and a well-located and 
properly constructed building is the natural and necessary center 
of the varied and important interests of the metropolitan district. 

II. GENERAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 
An analysis and summary of the detailed financial statements 
contained in this report show the following costs, exclusive of annual 
maintenance expenditures, and debt conditions : — 

Xovember 30, 1919. 

Cost of metropolitan park, water and sewerage systems, . . $81,328,485 66 

Gross debt, 77,121,874 50 

Sinking funds, 26,597,482 80 

Net debt, 50,524,391 70 

During the Year ending November 30, 1920. 

Increase in cost, 8544.709 19 

Increase in gross debt, 206,943 75 

Increase in sinking funds, 1,897.632 41 

Decrease in net debt, 1.690,688 66 

On Xovember 30, 1920. 
Net debt, S4S.S33.703 04 

The per capita net metropolitan debt based on the average popu- 
lation of the parks, water and sewerage districts is $36.79. Adding 
to this figure the proportional part of the net direct State debt 
borne by the inhabitants of the metropolitan district, which is 89.12, 
it appears that the per capita State and metropolitan net debt is 
845.91. 



4 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

A compilation of the net bonded debts of all States published in 
1919 by Alfred D. Chandler, Esq., indicated that the per capita 
State and metropolitan net debt upon the inhabitants of the metro- 
politan district of Massachusetts was more than double that of any 
other State in the Union. In this study the debts of municipalities, 
in the aggregate a great sum, are not included. 

III. GENERAL POLICY OF COMMISSION. 

The Commission, in formulating its policy and carrying on its 
work, has kept in mind the heavy burden of debt and taxation — 
national, State, metropolitan, and municipal — resting upon the in- 
habitants of this district. It has not overlooked the further fact 
that the metropolitan water works as designed in 1895 still require 
a considerable expenditure for completion, and if population and 
consumption of water continue to increase, more than $50,000,000 
may be required in the next ten years for additional sources of water 
supply. 

On December 13, 1919, in a letter to Governor Coolidge, the Com- 
mission said: — 

The men who secured for the public the great reservations of forest, shore 
and river did not contemplate the early expenditure of such large sums as the 
boulevards and other improvements have already cost. The heavy annual 
maintenance charge of the metropolitan park system must be met, but no ap- 
propriation for construction ought to be made until imperatively required. 

Recognizing that its duties are administrative, and that efficiency 
in the conduct of its work is essential to the public welfare, the 
Commission has effected numerous economies during the year. 
The consolidation of boards made it possible to have one secretary 
and one purchasing agent instead of two formerly required in each 
position. A reduction in the clerical force was made. The services 
of eight men at the Charles River Dam were found to be unneces- 
sary, and their names were stricken from the pay roll. The police 
force, which is required in full numbers during the summer months, 
has been reduced by resignations, discharges and otherwise during 
the fall and winter months by a total of twenty-one men. 

Several hundred naphtha lamps on outlying, uninhabited sections 
of parkways were extinguished during the year. These lamps were 
expensive, unsatisfactory and of little use, and an annual saving of 
about $14,000 was effected by their discontinuance. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 45. 

Various buildings, privileges and concessions were let in publicly 
advertised competition, wherever feasible, and rentals were obtained 
many thousands of dollars in excess of former returns. 

During the year wages and salaries in all branches of State serv- 
ice were considerably increased, and the prices of coal and other 
materials used in the various works were unreasonably and unex- 
pectedly high for many months. An effort was made to conserve 
appropriations, and defer construction which was not imperatively* 
required. Of the total appropriations for maintenance the unex- 
pended balances amounted to $153,264.22. 

A substantial saving to every city and town in the parks district 
was effected by the passage of chapter 443 of the Acts : 1 92 'i en- 
titled, "An Act to establish a basis for determining the annual as- 
sessments upon the municipalities within the Metropolitan Parks 
District for interest, sinking fund and serial bond requirements and 
cost of maintenance." This act, drawn by the secretary and in- 
troduced by the Commission, extended to t:m mum- district mm 
wise principle of legislative determination of assessments on mu- 
nicipalities, which principle was incorporated in the water act in 
1895, and extended to the sewerage districts in 1906. 

By the passage of this act the costly machinery of metropolitan 
apportionment commissions — with their long-drawn-out hearing-. 
salaried commissioners, formidable array of counsel, stenographers. 
printing bills and incidental expenses — became a memory. 

IV. FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, disbursements, assets and 
liabilities of the Metropolitan District Commission, Water and Sew- 
erage Divisions, for mm :rtate fiscal year, beginning with December 
1, 1919, and ending with November 30. 1920, was, in accordance 
with the requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 1906, 
presented to the Generm Court in January last, and a copy of this 
financial abstract is printed as Appendix No. 5. 

As required by said chapter a detailed statement of its doings for 
the calendar year 1920, in relation to the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Works, is herewith presented. 



6 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

WATER WORKS. 
Construction. 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments. 

Total loans authorized to January 1, 1921, $45,685,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property applicable to the construc- 
tion and acquisition of works : — 
For the period prior to January 1, 1920, . $259,342 67 

For the year ending December 31, 1920, . 5,560 96 

264,903 63 

Receipt from the town of Swampscott for admission to district 

(St. 1909, c. 320), 90,000 00 

Total amount authorized to January 1, 1921, . . . $46,039,903 63 
Amounts approved by Board for payments out of Water Loan 
Fund: — 
Payments prior to January 1, 1920, . . $43,257,951 63 
Approved for year ending December 31, 1920, 29,924 26 

43,287,875 89 

Amount authorized but not expended January 1, 1921, . $2,752,027 74 

(2) Total Water Debt, December 31, 1920. 

Water Loan Outstanding, Sinking Fund and Debt. 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth : — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3| per cent), $41,398,000 00 

Serial bonds (3i, 4 and 4i per cent), 1,549,000 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1920, .... $42,947,000 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1920, . $178,000 00 

Serial bonds paid in 1920, . . . . . 43,000 00 

221,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1920, . . $42,726,00000 

Gross water debt, $42,726,000 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1920, 16,953,165 15 

Net water debt December 31, 1920, $25,772,834 85 

A decrease for the year of $1,057,620.01. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, 
December 31, 1920. 



Year. 


Authorized 
Loans. 


Bonds 

issued (Sinking 

Fund). 


Bonds 

issued (Serial 
Bonds). 


Sinking Fund. 


1895 


$27,000,000 


$5,000,000 


- 


$226,286 05 


1896, 














- 


2,000,000 


- 


699,860 70 


1897, 














- 


6,000,000 


- 


954,469 00 


1898, 














- 


4,000,000 


- 


1,416,374 29 


1899, 














- 


3,000,000 


- 


1,349,332 97 


1900, 














- 


1,000,000 


- 


1,573,619 72 


1901, 














13,000,000 


10,000,000 


- 


1,662,426 95 


1902, 














- 


3,500,000 


- 


2,256,803 81 


1903, 














- 


1,500,000 


- 


2,877,835 59 


1904, 














- 


2,500,000 


- 


3,519,602 92 


1905, 














- 


650,000 


- 


4,207,045 69 


1906, 














500,000 


1,350,000 


- 


4,897,822 62 


1907, 














- 


"- 


- 


5,643,575 69 


1908, 














398,000 


- 


- 


6,419,283 28 


1909, 














900,000 


398,000 


- 


7,226,262 31 


1910, 














80,000 


500,000 


- 


8,089,902 91 


1911, 














212,000 


- 


$200,000 


8,953,437 44 


1912, 














600,000 


- 


190,000 


9,829,356 80 


1913, . 














108,000 


- 


- 


10,767,701 68 


1914, . 














- 


- 


258,000 


11,533,453 45 


1915, . 














- 


- 


490,000 


12,491,245 25 


1916, . 














- 


- 


66,000 


13,268,195 36 


1917, . 














- 


- 


150,000 


14,036,278 88 


1918, . 














115,000 


- ■ 


- 


14,870,834 84 


1919, . 














67,000 


- 


161,000 


15,904,545 14 


1920, . 














2,705,000 


- 


34,000 


16,953,165 15 
















$45,685,000 


$41,398,000 


$1,549,000 


- 



(4) Water Assessment, 1920. 

The following water assessment was made by the Treasurer of the 

Commonwealth upon the various municipalities : — 

i 

Sinking fund requirements, $248,053 52 

Serial bonds, 44,000 00 

Interest, 1,479,376 58 



8 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Maintenance : — 
Appropriated by Legislature, . 
Less balance on hand, 



Total water assessment for 1920, 



$815,683 52 
68,830 10 



$746,853 42 
$2,518,283 52 



In accordance with chapter 488, Acts of 1895, as amended in 1901, 
1904 and 1906, the proportion to be paid by each city and town is 
based one-third in proportion to their respective valuations and 
the remaining two-thirds in proportion to their respective water 
consumption for the preceding year, except that but one-fifth of 
the total valuation and no consumption has been taken for the 
city of Newton, as it has not been supplied with water from the 
metropolitan works. 

The division of the assessment for 1920 was as follows: — 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Belmont, 

Everett, 

Lexington, 

Maiden, 


$23,603 88 
13,440 08 
1,885,924 91 
59,247 66 
57,061 77 
9,156 47 
54,639 20 
38,174 66 
23,153 10 
13,261 28 


Newton, 

Quincy, 


$4,323 90 
6,557 62 
85,259 00 
35,210 63 
127,505 74 
11,488 42 
13,764 93 
38,534 77 
17,975 50 




$2,518,283 52 



(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of District 

and to Water Companies. 

Sums have been received during the year 1920 under the provisions 
of the metropolitan water act, for water furnished, as follows : — 

Town of Framingham, $4,447 78 

City of Revere (on account of water furnished to a portion of the 

townofSaugus for 1919), 580 00 

United States government (for Peddock's Island), .... 1,081 39 

Westborough State Hospital, 2,180 10 

$8,289 27 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



9 



The sums so received prior to March 23, 1907, were annually dis- 
tributed among the cities and towns of the district, but since that 
date, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 238 of the Acts 
of 1907, the sums so received have been paid into the sinking fund. 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition of Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Administration applicable to all parts of the construction and acquisition of 

the works, 

Distribution system : — 
Low service: — 
Section 46 (additional water supply for the East Boston district of the city 

of Boston), 

Northern high service: — 
Section 48 (reinforcement of the northern high-service pipe lines), . 
Section 49 (reinforcement of the northern high-service pipe lines), . 
Section 50 (reinforcement of the northern high-service pipe lines), . 
Additional pumping machinery at Spot Pond pumping station, 
Southern high service : — 
Additional pumping machinery at Chestnut Hill pumping station of the 

southern high service 

Northern extra high service: — 

Arlington Reservoir in Arlington, Mass., 

Section 45 (additional water supply for the town of Lexington) , 
Southern extra high service: — 
Section 44 (additional water supply for the town of Milton and the Hyde 

Park district of the city of Boston), 

Meters and connections, 

Stock — pipes, valves, castings, etc., purchased and sent first to storage yards, 
and later transferred, as needed, to the various parts of the work: — 

Amount received, 

Transferred from storage yards to the various sections of the work and in- 
cluded in costs of special works, 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1920, 

Total for construction and acquisition of works to January 1, 1921, 



$4,438 87 

987 87 

864 77 

1,000 08 

550 73 



1,524 92 



1,217 24 
8,903 09 



2,192 12 
994 66 



$5,913 00 
1,393 09 



$2,730 00 



22,674 35 



4,519 91 



$29,924 26 
43,257,951 63 

$43,287,875 89 



10 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Administration, 

General supervision, 

Taxes and other expenses, ......... 

Wachusett Department : — 

Superintendence, 

Reservoir, 

Forestry, 

Protection of supply, 

Buildings and grounds 

Wachusett Dam, 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Clinton sewerage system : — 

Pumping station, 

Sewers, screens and filter beds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Swamp drainage, 

Power plant, . . j . 

Wachusett-Sudbury power transmission line, 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations, 

Sudbury Department: — 

Superintendence, Framingham office, 

Ashland Reservoir, 

Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, . 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Lake Cochituate, ........... 

Marlborough Brook filters, 

Pegan filters, 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, 

Sanitary inspection, .......... 

Cochituate Aqueduct 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct, 

Forestry, 

Power plant, 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations, 

Distribution Department: — 

Superintendence, 

Pumping service: — 

Superintendence, 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropria- 
tions, 

Arlington pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Spot Pond pumping station, pumping service, .... 

Hyde Park pumping station, pumping service, .... 

Amounts carried forward, ......... 





$13,191 22 




42,397 40 




47,289 03 


$11,162 99 




22,375 81 




14,138 99 




7,078 04 




4,361 70 




10,922 38 




11,377 43 




2,560 26 




9,017 69 




660 20 




7,237 71 




22,678 86 




77 08 




462 51 


124,111 65 




$14,992 47 




3,787 89 




3,575 65 




3,508 88 




13,902 28 




13,324 60 




11,266 66 




7,002 73 




7,846 08 




2,570 27 




3,844 90 




4,713 36 




9,394 18 




9,023 37 




10,006 09 




11,496 19 




38 00 


130,293 60 




$10,576 18 





8,298 80 



984 38 


18,227 90 


146,674 97 


52,123 84 


44,516 11 


12,184 20 



,586 38 $338,598 82 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



11 



Maintenance and Opebatton. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Amounts brought forward, ......... 

Distribution Department — Con. 

Bear Hill Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds 

Fells Reservoir, 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station, ..... 

Mystic Reservoir 

Waban Hill Reservoir 

Weston Reservoir, 

Spot Pond, 

Buildings at Spot Pond, 

Pipe lines: — 

Low service, 

Northern high service, 

Northern extra high service, 

Southern high service, 

Southern extra high service, . 

Supply pipe lines, 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 

Glenwood pipe yard and buildings, 

Stables, 

Venturi meters, 

Measurement of water, 

Arlington pumping station, buildings and grounds, ... 4 
Hyde Park pumping station, buildings and grounds, .... 

Fisher Hill Reservoir, 

Bellevue Reservoir, 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations. 
Improvement and protection of water supplies, ' 

Total for maintaining and operating works, 



$293,586 38 $338,598 82 



294 65 


17,945 42 


1,759 44 


3,011 23 


6,151 97 


946 81 


507 IS 


5,701 32 


10,498 86 


1,430 33 


49,332 82 


14,098 78 


230 22 


14,102 34 


357 97 


1,793 99 


4,952 40 


2,683 45 


3,450 67 


10,434 39 


2,077 80 


4,711 82 


573 54 


430 71 


3,160 99 


264 37 


625 29 


1 77 


4 e;^ lift PO 




$812,399 79 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan 

Water Act. 

The Commissioner herewith presents, in accordance with the re- 
quirements of the metropolitan water act, a detailed statement of 
the expenditures and disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for 
the year 1920. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on ac- 
count of construction and acquisition of works for the year beginning 
January 1, 1920, and ending December 31, 1920, was $29,924.26 



12 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



and the total amount from the time of the organization of the 
Metropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1920, 
has been $43,287,875.89. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year 
were $812,399.79. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and the other expenses of 
administration, have been apportioned to the construction of the 
works and to the maintenance and operation of the same, and 
appear under each of those headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
general character: — 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 

Administration. 

Commissioners, 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery and printing, 

Postage, express and telegrams, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 

Rent and taxes, main office 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Engineering. 

Principal assistant engineers 

Engineering assistants, ........... 

Inspectors, 

Railroad and street car travel, 

Stationery and printing, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of buildings, main office, . 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Construction. 
Preliminary work: — 
Advertising, 

Contracts, distribution system: — 

John A. Gaffey, for resurfacing about 1,000 feet of Massachusetts Avenue in 
Arlington, Mass., along Section 45 of the northern extra high-service pipe 
lines (additional water supply for the town of Lexington, Mass.), Con- 
tract 2 (new series), 

Warren Foundry & Machine Co., for furnishing cast-iron water pipes and 
special castings for use on Section 44 of the southern extra high service 
(additional water supply for the town of Milton, Mass., and the Hyde 
Park district of the city of Boston), Contract 393 (in part), . 

Amounts carried forward, . . . 



$450 03 


523 00 


1,180 00 


190 10 


36 00 


201 65 


144 22 


5 00 


$1,096 42 


4,030 63 


315 00 


10 


31 86 


605 03 


432 68 


2 90 



$3,031 80 



646 91 



$2,730 00 



6,514 62 



80 75 



5,678 71 $9,325 37 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 48. 



13 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Amounts brought forward, 



Construction — Con. 
Contracts, distribution system — Con. 

Warren Foundry & Machine Co., for furnishing cast-iron water pipes and 
special castings for use on Section 45 of the northern extra high service 
(additional water supply for the town of Lexington, Mass.), Contract 
393 (in part), 

Warren Foundry & Machine Co., for furnishing cast-iron water pipes and 
special castings for use on Section 46 of the low service (additional water 
supply for the East Boston district of the city of Boston), Contract 393 
(in part), 

Warren Foundry & Machine Co., for furnishing cast-iron water pipes and 
special castings, Contract 393 (in part) 

Vincenzo Grande, for laying water pipes in West Roxbury, Mass., Section 
44 of the southern extra high service (additional water supply for the 
town of Milton and the Hyde Park district of the city of Boston), Con- 
tract 394 

James Barletta for laying water pipes in Arlington, Mass., Section 45 of the 
northern extra high service (additional water supply for the town of 
Lexington, Mass.), Contract 395, 

Coleman Bros., for laying water pipes in Chelsea, Mass., Section 46 of the low 
service (additional water supply for the East Boston district of the city 
of Boston), Contract 396 



$3,678 71 



$9,325 37 



Additional work: — 

Labor, 

Freight and express, ■ 

Castings, ironwork and metals 

Iron pipe and valves, 

Brick, cement and stone, 

Sand, gravel and filling, 

Tools, machinery, appliances and hardware supplies, 
Municipal and corporation work, .... 
Miscellaneous expenses, 



Real Estate. 



Legal and expert : — 
Conveyancing expenses, 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1920, 

Total amount of construction expenditures to January 1, 1921, 

Maintenance and Operation of Works. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent 

Amount carried forward, ........ 



2,330 04 

2,486 82 
2,927 28 

487 34 
1,816 60 
1,313 26 





239 03 


589 33 


1,686 82 


89 55 


16 25 


685 00 


78 84 


9 30 



15,040 05 



5,555 04 



3 80 



$29,924 26 
43,257,951 63 

$43,287,875 89 



$2,150 00 

7,771 68 

689 05 



$10,610 73 



14 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Amounts brought forward, .......... 

Administration — Con. 

Repairs of building, ........... 

Fuel 

Lighting, 

Care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses, . . . . . . . . • 

Miscellaneous expenses, ........... 

General supervision: — 

Chief engineer and assistants, 

Rent, 

Repairs of building, 

Fuel 

Lighting, 

Care of building, 

Postage, 

Express and telegrams, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . . . . . . ' 

Pumping service: — ■ 

Superintendence, 

Labor 

Fuel, 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Repairs, 

Small supplies, 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations, 

Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Superintendents, 

Engineering assistants, 

Sanitary inspectors, 

Labor, pay roll 

Labor, miscellaneous, ■ . 

Alterations and repairs of pumping stations, 

Alterations and repairs of other buildings and structures, . 

Automobiles, . . 

Brick, ........ '. 

Brooms, brushes and janitor's supplies, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, ......... 

Cement and lime, . . . . 

Drafting and photo supplies, 

Amounts carried forward, .......... 



$10,610 73 


32 42 


129 02 


67 74 


719 46 


170 00 


1,098 95 


135 66 


37 10 


190 14 

. „ <tn 1 01 oo 




$32,794 71 


2,067 23 


100 25 


387 0) 


203 24 


2,158 83 


165 00 


164 07 


1,896 67 


488 71 


1,242 61 


729 03 


d° °07 i(\ 




$8,298 80 


120,685 56 


120,740 63 


3,591 53 


26,448 74 


2,260 56 


984 38 


oc t? nm °n 




$8,678 17 


19,588 68 


3,853 60 


283,558 10 


10,291 63 


1,714 02 


10,156 07 


18,277 74 


534 63 


545 57 


1,449 02 


1,192 25 


418 89 



,258 37 $338,598 82 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



15 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Amounts brought forward, $360,258 37 $338,398 82 



Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds — Con. 

Electrical supplies, 

Fertilizer and planting material, 

Freight and express, 

Fuel, 

Gypsy moth supplies, 

Hardware, 

Hay and grain 

Horses 

Lighting, . . " 

Lumber, 

Machinery, 

Paints and oils, 

Pipe and fittings 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Rubber and oiled goods, 

Stable expenses 

Sand, gravel and stone, 

Traveling expenses, 

Telephones, . . . 

Teaming, 

Tools and appliances, 

Vehicles, harnesses and fittings, 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Contracts: — 
Thomas A. Elston & Co., Inc., Contract 3-M (new series), for razing the 
brick chimney at the old Mystic pumping station in West Somerville, 
Mass 

Improvement and protection of water supplies 

Water from city of Worcester, 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations, 



1.713 35 
1,721 24 

491 89 
6,199 78 
2,742 98 
2,907 70 
1,347 57 
1,415 00 

373 10 
3,870 56 
2,044 63 
2,855 95 
4,032 89 

159 79 
3,020 66 

708 26 
1,082 79 

777 34 
2,992 19 
1,453 69 
5,803 37 
7,397 36 
1,028 76 
5.337 42 



1,335 31 

1,597 79 

686 40 

1,125 80 



Payments in lieu of taxes, 



Total expenditures for maintenance and operation, 



426.511 94 
47.2S9 03 

$812,399 79 



(6) Receipts. 

The total amount of receipts from the operations of the Commis- 
sion and from sales of property for the year beginning January 1, 
1920, and ending December 31, 1920, was 8119,357.44, and the 
total amount from the time of the organization of the Metropolitan 
Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1920, has been 
SI, 718,373. OS. The general character of these receipts is as fol- 
lows : — 



16 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



General Character of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Applicable to the loan fund : — 






Construction tools, supplies and reimbursements, 




$5,560 96 


Applicable to payment of interest, sinking fund requirements and expenses 






of maintenance and operation: — 






Proceeds from operations of the Board: — 








$4,990 14 






6,944 79 






89,734 09 




Maintenance labor, tools, supplies and reimbursements, .... 


3,722 11 






116 08 


105,507 21 


Applicable to the sinking fund: — 




Water supplied to cities and towns, water companies and others, 




8,289 27 




$119,357 44 


Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1920, 




1,599,015 64 


Total receipts to January 1, 1921, 


$1,718,373 08 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects 
or works, as follows : — 



Sources of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Supplying water outside of water district, . 
Construction and acquisition of works: — 

Administration, 

Wachusett Reservoir, . 

Distribution system, 

Maintenance and operation of works: — 

Administration 

General supervision, 

Wachusett Aqueduct, . 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Wachusett electric power plant, 

Sudbury system, ........ 

Sudbury electric power plant, 

Distribution system, ....... 

Clinton sewerage system, 

Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1920, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1921, .... 



5,289 27 



$117 92 




287 50 




5,271 06 






5,676 48 




$266 95 




669 65 




254 15 




5,865 35 




50,115 42 




3,186 17 




39,653 32 




3,669 20 




1,711 48 






105,391 69 




$119,357 44 




1,599,015 64 




$1,718,373 08 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 17 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the water works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Commission: — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; police supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; ma- 
chinery, tools and other appliances and supplies; completed works, real 
estate and buildings connected therewith. 

(d) Liabilities. 

There are sundry bills for current expenses which have not yet 
been received. 



Amount on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contract or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


Joseph Hanreddy, , 


Contract 314, Section 7 of the Weston Aqueduct 
supply mains, in Newton, Mass. 


$10 00 





Settlements are pending with the following parties for land and 
easements taken in lands owned by them : — 

New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, Fred- 
erique Ropp, heirs of Ella Wood, Jack Calcia, Brayton D. Fisher, 
heirs of Andrew Temple. 

SEWERAGE WORKS. 
(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments. 

The loans authorized for the construction of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of 
these loans, the expenditures for construction, and the balances 
available on January 1, 1921, have been as follows: — 

North Metropolitan System. 
Loans authorized under various acts to January 1, 1921, for the 
construction of the North Metropolitan System and the 
various extensions, $7,512,365 73 



18 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources 

which are placed to the credit of the North Metropolitan 

System : — 

For the year ending December 31, 1920, . . $1,114 99 

For the period prior to January 1, 1920, . . 86,233 22 

$87,348 21 



$7,599,713 94 
Amount approved for payment from the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Loan Fund, North System : — 
For the year ending December 31, 1920, . . $105,099 11 
For the period prior to January 1, 1920, . . 7,441,558 47 

7,546,657 58 



Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 1921, . $53,056 36 

South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under the various acts to January 1, 1921, 
applied to the construction of the Charles River valley 
sewer, Neponset valley sewer, high-level sewer and exten- 
sions, constituting the South Metropolitan System, . . $9,912,046 27 
Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and from miscella- 
neous sources, which are placed to the credit of the South 
Metropolitan System : — 
For the year ending December 31, 1920, . . $141 40 

For the period prior to January 1, 1920, . . 19,739 65 

19,881 05 



$9,931,927 32 
Amount approved for payment from the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Loan Fund, South System: — 
On account of the Charles River valley sewer, . $800,046 27 
On account of the Neponset valley sewer, . . 911,531 46 
On account of the high-level sewer and exten- 
sions, including Wellesley extension : — 
For the year ending December 

31, 1920, $214,185 90 

For the period prior to January 

1, 1920, ..... 7,880,678 82 

8,094,864 72 

9,806,442 45 



Balance, South Metropolitan System, January 1, 1921, . $125,484 87 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 48. 19 



(2) Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1920. 

North Metropolitan System. 
Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth : — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3 J per cent), $6,563,000 00 

Serial bonds (3| and 4 per cent), 925,500 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1920, $7,488,500 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1920, . . $128,000 00 
Serial bonds paid in 1920, . .... 26,500 00 

154,500 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1920, . . . $7,334,000 00 

Gross sewerage debt, $7,334,000 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1920, 3,221,141 35 

Net sewerage debt December 31, 1920, 84,112,858 65 

A net decrease for the year of $301,426.27. 

South Metropolitan System. 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth : — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3i per cent), $8,877,912 00 

Serial bonds (4, 4| and 5 per cent) , 945,000 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1920, $9,822,912 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1920, . . $63,000 00 
Serial bonds paid in 1920, 27,000 00 

90,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1920, . . . $9,732,912 00 

Gross sewerage debt, $9,732,912 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1920, 1,947,382 68 

Net sewerage debt December 31, 1920, $7,785,529 32 

A net decrease for the year of $24.69. 



20 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



(3) North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, 

December 31, 1920. 







Loans. 


Bonds issued 
(Sinking Fund). 


Bonds issued 
(Serial Bonds). 


Sinking 
Fund. 


Year. 


North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North and 

South 
Systems. 


1889, 
1890, 
1891, 
1892, 
1893, 
1894, 
1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912, 
1913, 
1914, 
1915, 
1916, 
1917, 
1918, 
1919, 
1920, 




$5,000,000 00 

500,000 00 

300,000 00 

30,000 00 

85,000 00 

215,000 00 

265,000 00 

500,000 00 

55,000 00 

413,000 00 

56,000 00 

6,000 00 

378,000 00 

130,500 00 
83,000 00 2 
285,000 00 


$500,000 00 

300,000 00 

35,000 00 

4,625,000 00 

10,912 00 1 

40,000 00 

1,000,000 00 
392,000 00 

1,175,000 00 

350,000 00 

5,000 00 

40,000 00 

325,000 00 

225,000 00 
100,000 00 


$2,200,000 

368,000 

1,053,000 

579,000 

500,000 

300,000 

30,000 

80,000 

220,000 

265,000 

500,000 

55,000 

300,000 
113,000 


$800,000 

300,000 

200,000 

300,000 

35,000 

1,025,000 
10,912 

2,040,000 
864,000 

1,736,000 
392,000 

175,000 
300,000 
700,000 


$62,000 
378,000 

130,500 

70,000 

285,000 


$355,000 

40,000 

325,000 

225,000 


$361,416 59 

454,520 57 

545,668 26 

636,084 04 

754,690 41 

878,557 12 

1,008,724 95 

1,146,998 68 

1,306,850 30 

1,492,418 98 

1,673,784 40 

1,931,741 89 

2,184,674 98 

2,458,541 20 

2,749,337 90 

3,011,512 44 

3,290,979 46 

3,604,657 27 

3,925,792 75 

4,270,205 50 

4,695,573 07 

5,168,524 03 




$8,301,500 00 3 
789,134 27 


$9,122,912 00 
789,134 27 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






$7,512,365 73 


$9,912,046 27 


$6,563,000 


$8,877,912 


$925,500 


$945,000 


- 



1 The sum of $10,912 was appropriated to reimburse the town of Watertown for the expense of con- 
structing the Watertown siphon. 

2 This amount includes $13,000, balance of appropriation for north metropolitan maintenance under 
chapter 775, Acts of 1914, which was transferred to North Metropolitan Loan Fund, under authority of 
chapter 76, Resolves of 1915. No bonds to be issued, as this was cash. 

3 Of this amount, $789,134.27 was expended for the construction of the Charles River valley sewer, which 
is now included in the South Metropolitan System. 



(4) Sewer Assessments, 1920. 
The following sewer assessments were made by the Treasurer of 
the Commonwealth upon the various municipalities : — 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Sinking fund requirements, 

Serial bonds, 

Interest 



$140,135 69 

24,000 00 

234,826 02 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



21 



Maintenance : — 
Appropriated by Legislature, . . . . . $292,576 56 
Less balance on hand, 44,219 37 



Total North Metropolitan sewerage assessment, 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Sinking fund requirements, 

Serial bonds, 

Interest, '. 

Maintenance: — 

Appropriated by Legislature, $182,603 02 

Less balance on hand, . . ..... . 15,341 94 



Total South Metropolitan sewerage assessment, 



$248,357 19 
$647,318 90 



$115,396 83 

27,000 00 

337,623 81 



167,261 08 

$647,281 72 



In accordance with the provisions of chapter 369, Acts of 1906, 
the proportion to be paid by each city and town to meet the interest 
and sinking fund requirements for each year is based upon their 
respective taxable valuations, and to meet the cost of maintenance 
and operation upon their respective populations. 

The divisions of the assessments for 1920 were as follows : — • . 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Cities and Town's. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Arlington, 
Belmont, . 
Boston, . 
Cambridge, 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Lexington, 
Maiden, . 
Medford, . 
Melrose, . 








- ; 


$18,945 58 

11,661 00 

100,545 47 

136,545 79 

42,296 59 

41,563 16 

5,254 64 

47,039 98 

34,344 10 

19,111 76 


Reading, 1 
Revere, . 
Somerville, 
Stone ham, 
Wakefield, 
Winchester, 
Winthrop, 
Wo burn, . 












$5,266 29 
25,805 29 
89,939 26 
7,263 45 
13,847 34 
15,193 51 
15,538 04 
17,157 65 


Total, 












$647,318 90 



1 Reading is also assessed $7,000 for sinking fund requirements in accordance with section 5, chapter 
159, General Acts of 1916. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Boston, ...... 

Brookline, ..... 

Dedham, ..... 

Milton, 

Newton, ...... 

Quincy, 


$320,757 57 
85,939 62 
14,579 76 
18,537 12 
76,861 69 
54,305 19 


Waltham, ..... 
Watertown, ..... 
Wellesley, l 

Total, 


S3 6, 630 74 
27,861 53 
11,808 50 


$647,281 72 



1 Wellesley is also assessed $6,775.23 for sinking fund requirements in accordance with section 5, chapter 
343, Acts of 1914. 



22 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



(5) Expenditures for the Different Works. 
The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works: — 



Construction and Acquisition of Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



North Metropolitan System. 
North System, enlargement: — 
Administration, ....... 

Reading extension: — 

Section 73, 

Section 74, 

Section 75, 

Section 76 

Real estate settlements, 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1920, . 

Total for North Metropolitan System to January 1, 1921, 

South Metropolitan System. 
High-level sewer extensions: — 

Administration, 

Wellesley extension: — 

Section 98, 

Section 99 

Section 100 

Section 101 

Section 102 

Section 103 

Section 105, ......... 

Section 106, 

Real estate settlements, 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, . 

Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1920, 
Total for South Metropolitan System to January 1, 1921, 
Total for construction, both systems, . 



$2,783 97 




13,497 61 




21,544 37 




62,510 37 




1,656 00 




136 93 






102,129 25 








. 


7,441,558 47 


. . 


$7,546,657 58 



$720 39 

76,398 42 

92,852 84 

39,007 83 

1,384 99 

173 00 

14 00 

64 38 

453 00 

38 26 



$2,969 86 



$3,078 79 



211,107 11 



• $214,185 90 
9,592,256 55 

$9,806,442 45 

$17,353,100 03 



Maintenance and Operation. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 




$309,476 17 
190,826 44 




$500,302 61 


t — . ... . 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



23 



(6) Detailed Financial Statement. 
The Commissioner herewith presents, in accordance with the 
metropolitan sewerage acts, an abstract of the expenditures and 
disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending 
December 31, 1920: — 



(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 
North System Enlargement. 
Administration : — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 

Rent and taxes, main office, . 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors, 

Traveling expenses, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 

Engineering and drafting supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 

Rent and taxes, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Construction: — 
Advertising, 

Tools, machinery and appliances, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 

Rendle-Stoddard Co., Contract 146, for constructing Section 73 of the 
Reading extension of the North Metropolitan System in Woburn and 
Stoneham, 

Rendle-Stoddard Co.. Contract 148, for constructing Section 74 of the 
Reading extension of the North Metropolitan System in Stoneham, . 

Antony Cefalo, Contract 4 (new series), for constructing Section 75 of the 
Reading extension of the North Metropolitan System in Stoneham and 
Wakefield 

Amounts carried forward, .......... 



$499 99 
230 00 

1,703 17 

170 94 

196 71 

160 25 

8 80 



$416 67 


5,184 11 


571 15 


236 98 


254 86 


25 52 


21 44 


590 14 


480 75 


67 63 


$189 57 


3 50 


5,851 17 



$2,639 77 
11,883 38 

17,824 83 



$2,969 86 



7,849 25 



6,044 24 



$32,347 98 $16,863 35 



24 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Amounts brought forward, 



North System Enlargement — Con. 
Contracts — Con. 
Bruno & Petitti, Contract 1 (new series) for constructing part of Section 76 
of the Reading extension of the North Metropolitan System in Wakefield 
and Reading, 

N 

Real estate: — 

Settlements, 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, 

Total for North Metropolitan System, 



South Metropolitan System. 
High-level Sewer Extensions. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, . 

Rent and taxes, main office 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors, 

Traveling expenses, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, . 

Stationery, printing and office supplies 

Engineering and drafting supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Construction: — 

Advertising, 

Labor and teaming, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 

Contracts : — 
Thomas Russo & Co., Contract 138, for constructing Section 98 of the 
Wellesley extension of the high-level sewer in West Roxbury and Ded- 
ham. Amount paid in settlement of all claims and demands for ma- 
terials furnished and money expended on account of said contract, 
which was abandoned by said company, 



$32,347 98 $16,863 35 



54,094 85 



$1,656 00 
136 93 



$499 99 
981 00 
1,016 25 
207 19 
211 12 
160 24 
3 00 



$416 67 


7,116 90 


2,737 27 


1,222 45 


8 60 


283 40 


107 38 


633 34 


480 75 


269 05 


$135 40 


52 00 


2,226 16 



$656 77 



86,442 83 



1,792 93 



$105,099 11 



$3,078 79 



13,275 81 



2,413 56 



Amounts carried forward, 



$656 77 $18,768 16 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



25 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Amounts brought forward, 



High-level Sewer Extensions — Con. 
Contracts — Con. 
Rowe Contracting Co., Contract 139, for constructing Section 99 (in part) of 

the Wellesley extension of the high-level sewer in Dedham, . 
John P. Cavanagh Co., Contract 149, for constructing Section 99 (in part) 

of the Wellesley extension of the high-level sewer in Dedham, 
Rendle-Stoddard Co., Contract 3 (new series), for constructing Section 99 
(in part) of the Wellesley extension of the high-level sewer in Dedham, 
Bruno & Petitti, Contract 2 (new series), for constructing Section 100 

of the Wellesley extension of the high-level sewer in Dedham, 

Rendle-Stoddard Co., Contract 145, for constructing Section 101 of the 

Wellesley extension of the high-level sewer in Needham and Dedham, 

Bruno & Petitti, Contract 143, for constructing Section 102 of the Wellesley 

extension of the high-level sewer in Needham, 

Real estate: — 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, 

Settlements, 

Total for South Metropolitan System, . . . . . 



Maintenance and Operation of Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, . . 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, . . . 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Deer Island pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Amounts carried forward, ...... 



§656 77 $18,768 16 



2,500 00 




3,048 10 




65,911 13 




89,517 75 




33,202 73 




90 00 






194,926 48 




$453 00 




38 26 






491 26 






S214.185 90 



$749 99 


2,922 82 


240 36 


300 44 


60 00 


358 12 


46 68 


10 00 


36 70 


$8,923 23 


721 13 


901 53 


44 00 


214 71 


140 06 


25 00 


73 15 


S32.296 03 


51,317 50 



$4,725 11 



11,042 81 



S83.613 53 $15,767 92 



26 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



Amounts brought forward, 

North Metropolitan System — Con. 
Deer Island pumping station — Con. 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, ....... 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

East Boston pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Charlestown pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, . . . . . . . 

General supplies, ....... 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Alewife Brook pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing 

Repairs and renewals, ...... 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Engineering assistants, 

Labor, 

Automobiles, ........ 

Brick, cement and lime, 

Castings, ironwork and metals 

Amounts carried forward, ..... 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



$83,613 53 $15,767 92 



1,183 65 

1,491 00 

390 08 

1,527 98 

18 10 

981 58 

305 70 



$37,199 22 

35,859 66 

1,116 14 

2,046 28 

35 18 

802 82 

503 55 

302 36 



$23,746 13 

12,495 00 

454 22 

656 28 

61 66 

125 42 

8 60 

261 72 

96 42 



$11,903 32 

6,702 43 

547 86 

282 48 

50 56 

195 84 

7 20 

72 75 

306 88 



$2,515 00 

46,951 83 

436 13 

1,402 64 

2,058 00 



),511 62 



77,865 21 



37,905 45 



20,069 32 



$53,363 60 $241,119 52 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



27 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31. 1920. 



Amounts brought forward, $53,363 60 $241,119 52 



North Metropolitan System — Con. 
Sewer lines, buildings and grounds — Con. 

Freight, express and teaming, 

Fuel and lighting, 

Jobbing and repairing, 

Lumber 

Machinery, tools and appliances, 

Paints and oils 

Rubber and oiled goods. 

Sand, gravel and stone, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Horses, vehicles and stable account, ........ 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations, 



Total for North Metropolitan System, 



South Metropolitan System. 



Administration: — 
Commissioners, . 
Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies. 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, . 



General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, 

Rent 

Heating, lighting and care of building. 
Printing, stationery and office supplies. 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, . 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 



Ward Street pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste. 

Water 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals. 
Telephones, .... 



3 11 

US 40 

245 55 

1,460 52 

1.124 43 

1,138 13 

206 33 

779 94 

259 25 

929 03 

2,331 47 

506 42 



$650 00 

2.544 74 

20S 32 

250 75 

30 00 

361 20 

40 89 

21 35 



§5.379 34 
624 93 
752 43 
176 53 
122 69 
50 00 
1 00 



S37.1SS 50 

36.435 05 

764 38 

1.713 72 

131 23 

1.853 33 

15 51 



62,466 23 

5,184 63 

705 79 

$309,476 17 



$4,107 25 



M06 97 



Amounts carried forward. 



$73,101 27 $11,214 22 



28 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1920. 



Amounts brought forward, .......... 

South Metropolitan System — Con. 
Ward Street Pumping Station — Con, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Quincy pumping station: — 

Labor 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Nut Island screen-house: — 

Labor, . . 

Fuel, . . ' 

Oil and waste, ............ 

Water, ^ . . . . , 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds : — 

Engineering assistants, 

Labor, 

Automobiles, 

Brick, cement and lime, ......... 

Castings, ironwork and metals, 

Fuel and lighting 

Freight, express and teaming, 

Jobbing and repairing, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, tools and appliances, 

Paints and oils, 

Rubber and oiled goods, 

Sand, gravel and stone, 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses, 

General supplies, ........... 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

City of Boston for pumping, 

Horses, vehicles and stable account, . . . . . ' . 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations 

Total for South Metropolitan System, 



i,101 27 $11,214 22 



1,455 13 
1,704 54 



$13,072 29 

10,916 10 

423 38 

419 29 

43 93 

111 56 

10 85 

293 11 

62 42 



$12,110 96 

5,700 00 

250 77 

374 73 

14 37 

81 17 

10 55 

311 38 

115 39 



$5,355 45 

32,900 69 

940 90 

350 80 

124 87 

26 38 
55 95 

27 25 
175 49 
405 88 
719 04 
309 87 

68 78 

160 20 

1,046 37 

1,438 61 

437 68 



81,260 94 



25,352 93 



18,969 32 



44,544 21 

5,869 36 

3,089 11 

526 35 

$190,826 44 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



29 



(b) Receipts. 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other 
sources, have been credited as follows : — 



Account. 



For the 

Year ending 

December 31, 

1920. 



Construction: — 

North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System, ...... 

Maintenance: — 

North Metropolitan System, ...... 

South Metropolitan System, 

Sinking fund: — 
North Metropolitan System, 

Interest fund: — 

North Metropolitan System, ....... 

South Metropolitan System, 

Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1920, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1921, . 



L.114 99 
141 40 



411 69 
328 66 



216 64 



55 74 
50 43 



$2,319 55 
153,865 56 



$156,185 11 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the sewerage works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Commission: — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; machinery, tools and 
other appliances and supplies; completed works, real estate connected there- 
with. 

(d) Liabilities. 

There are sundry bills for current expenses which have not yet 
been received. 



Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


North System enlargement: — 






Antony Cefalo, .... 


Contract 4 (new series), Section 75, Reading ex- 
tension. 


$3,145 57 


Bruno & Petitti, .... 


Contract 1 (new series), Section 76 (in part), 
Reading extension. 


9,546 15 


High-level sewer extensions: — 






Timothy O'Connell, 


Contract 57, Section 82 (in part), .... 


60 00 


Rendle-Stoddard Co., 


Contract 3 (new series), Section 99 (in part), 
Wellesley extension. 


11,631 37 


Bruno & Petitti 


Contract 2 (new series), Section 100, Wellesley ex- 
tension. 


15,797 25 


Rendle-Stoddard Co., 


Contract 145, Section 101, Wellesley extension, 


5,859 29 



30 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Settlements are pending with the following parties for easements 
taken in lands owned by them : — 

Clifford M. Locke, Martha W. Burrage, Edward and Catherine 
Bingham, Katherine H. Rooney, Mary A. Read, Hannah E. Pond, 
Richard G. Wadsworth, Frank D. Chase, heirs of Stephen M. Weld, 
Bear Hill Associates, Herbert M. Hopkins, Joseph E. Hopkins, 
George A. Forbes, Lawrence Minot and Moses Williams, Trustees, 
Frederick P. Royce and Francis Peabody, Trustees, Maurice Mc- 
Kenna, Michael Flynn, Sarah A. Brown, John B. Tidd, Cornelius 
J. Sweeney, Mary A. Scalley, Stoneham Branch Railroad, Elizabeth 
L. McGrady, Margaret McLaughlin, Annie E. Greene, Estate of 
Ellen Magner, Richard C. Christie, Carl and Emelia Christiansen, 
Ida A. Nilsson, Bridget Mary McCarty, Walter Steele, Betty K. 
Farr, Emma C. and Ruth G. Prescott. 

V. OTHER REPORTS. 
The detailed reports of the Directors of Parks, Park Engineering, 
Water and Sewerage, with the usual tables and statistics, are here- 
with presented. The financial statement of the Parks Division fol- 
lows the report of the Director of Park Engineering. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES A. BAILEY, 

Metropolitan District Commissioner. 
Boston, February 26, 1921. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 31 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PARKS. 



December 3, 1920. 

Hon. James A. Bailey, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission, Boston, 

Mass. 

Dear Sir : — I herewith submit a brief report on the condition 
of the metropolitan parks and parkways under my general super- 
vision as Director of Parks. 

The usual work of maintenance and upkeep of the various park- 
ways and reservations has been carried on throughout the year, and 
while there are certain pieces of work which have not been done be- 
cause of inability to secure necessary labor, the general situation is 
satisfactory and the work well in hand. 

The construction work that was under way in the autumn of 
1919 has largely been completed, as you will see by the engineer's 
report. Other outstanding matters of interest for the year 1920 
are as follows : — 

At the Blue Hills Reservation the work of removing chestnut trees 
dying from chestnut tree blight has progressed favorably, but it is 
a large undertaking. It is fortunate that the work was begun last 
year, as the ravage of the chestnut tree blight during the past sum- 
mer has been very rapid. It will require another year and a half 
to complete this work. 

It leaves the reservation in a very denuded and ugly condition, 
but nature will rapidly assert itself and cover the bare places. The 
pine trees which have been planted throughout the reservation during 
the last fifteen years will assist in replacing the chestnut trees. 

All the reservations are reasonably free from gypsy moths and 
other insect pests, with the exception of the Blue Hills Reservation. 
Here the gypsy moth continues to be a serious menace, but the re- 
moval of such a large number of chestnut trees should make the 
handling of the gypsy moth an easier matter. 

The superintendent of the Middlesex Fells Division discovered a 
new insect pest during the past summer, which we trust will not 



32 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

become serious. Apparently he was the first person to call the at- 
tention of the proper national authorities to this new pest. 

The subject which excited the most public interest and discussion 
was a rule regulating the use of the bath-houses at Nahant, Revere 
and Nantasket. 

For a number of years past the custom of hiring a bathing suit 
and room in the early forenoon of a hot summer day, leaving one's 
street clothes in the bath-house, and, having donned the bathing 
suit, to pass the rest of the day upon the beach, has increased. 
Naturally this congested the bath-houses, stopped all circulation, 
gave accommodations to a comparative few, and deprived those 
who came later of an opportunity to get a sea bath. 

To overcome this, a rule was adopted at the beginning of the 
bathing season of 1920, limiting the use of the room and the bathing 
suit rented of the Commission to two hours, and subjecting those 
who disobeyed this rule to the liability of arrest and prosecution. 
The rule has been in effect throughout the bathing season of 1920, 
and has proved an entire success. But few cases of prosecution were 
necessary; the court sustained the reasonableness of the rule, and 
imposed small fines, which was sufficient to cause obedience to the 
rule. At no time were the bath-houses congested, and the public 
as a whole think the rule a reasonable one and approve it. 

The bath yards of both the Revere Beach and Nantasket Beach 
bath-houses, built some twenty years ago of wood, are rapidly de- 
caying. Extensive necessary repairs increase each year, and are at 
the best but a makeshift. 

I recommend that plans be prepared and funds provided to re- 
place these wooden structures with concrete buildings of permanent 
nature. 

At Nantasket Beach a foundation was constructed in the autumn 
of 1919 at the corner of County Road and Wharf Avenue, with the 
intention of building a store on this corner. Later this was con- 
sidered inadvisable. 

There is a very distinct demand for a large waiting room at this 
point, and this foundation should be used for such a building. 
There is also the necessity for a large sanitary building for men 
which could be placed in the rear. This, with the women's sanitary 
building already provided, would make a nice group of buildings. 

The Nantasket Beach Hotel, built of wood, deteriorates year by 
year. It is now nearly fifty years old, and is not a building in 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 48. 33 

which one can take pride. It seems an anomaly for the Metropoli- 
tan District Commission to be, even as landlords, conducting a 
summer hotel. I recommend that at the termination of the present 
lease in the autumn of 1922 the upper stories of the hotel be torn 
down. 

The metropolitan park police have done a great deal of valuable 
work during the past year. It was thought that national prohi- 
bition might make it possible to decrease the size of the police force, 
but experience has shown this to be quite out of the question. The 
greatly increased number of motor vehicles and the way they are 
used make it necessary to keep the police force up to its full quota 
of 150 patrolmen. 

The number of band concerts given during the past summer was 
approximately the same as in previous years, with the exception of 
Revere Beach, where fewer concerts were given. 

For a number of years past the attendance at the various con- 
certs has been decreasing, and the past summer was no exception. 
I am convinced that the public have lost their interest in band 
concerts, and that a much fewer number will give as much, or more, 
pleasure than the large number of concerts given at the present 
time. 

The only place where the concerts seemed to be really enjoyed 
was at Nantasket. 

During the winter of 1920 the Blue Hills street car line from 
Mattapan to the Blue Hills Reservation ceased operating, and since 
then there has been no practical way for persons of moderate means 
to get to this reservation, so that very few people as compared with 
previous years have used the reservation during the past season. 
Something should be done to remedy this. 

The following matters for which funds have been provided are as 
yet to be completed: — ■ 

Rough grading of Old Colony Parkway; funds partially provided, 
work temporarily suspended. 

Neponset River bridge at Xeponset; funds provided, but inade- 
quate because of the excessive price of labor and materials. 

Half-tide Dam, Black's Creek, Quincy Shore Reservation; funds 
provided, but bids excessive. 

West Roxbury Parkway bridge across the New Haven Railroad; 
funds provided, and work to proceed in the spring. 

Riprapping, Nahant Beach playground; funds provided. 



34 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

The following matters are those for which no funds have been 
provided, but for which there should be appropriations: — 

Completion of Furnace Brook Parkway from Newport Avenue to 
Hancock Street, a short but expensive piece of work which would 
complete Furnace Brook Parkway. 

Winthrop Parkway should be completed and a permanent sea wall 
provided at the base of the hill and along Short Beach. 

An appropriation for the acquiring of land for Hammonds Pond 
Parkway from Weld Street in West Roxbury to land already ac- 
quired in Brookline, and from Beacon Street in Newton to Galen 
Street bridge, over the Charles River, in Watertown. 

The acquiring of this land, particularly in portions of Newton, is 
especially desirable before expensive buildings are built upon it. 
The acquiring of land for Lynn Fells Parkway should also be pro- 
vided for. 

The construction of these parkways should be postponed, but the 
land should be acquired. 

Restrictions on shores of Mystic Lake; funds should be provided. 

The Cambridge-Somerville boulevard is such an expensive under- 
taking that it seems inadvisable to consider it at this time, but 
every year it becomes more of a necessity. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELLERTON P. WHITNEY, 

Director of Parks. 















































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1 


a 
1 
I 
1 


1 


3 
I 


| 

a 
| 


CO 
S 


a 
e 

u 


i 

5 


1 

c 


1 


fe 


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1 


8 

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1 

2 
3 

4 
5 

r 

8 

e 

10 

ii 

12 

13 
U 

16 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
.'. 
27 

28 
20 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
30 
37 
38 


Boston, 
Cambridge, 
Chelsea, 
Everett, . 

MaldoD, 
Medford, . 
Melrose, 
Newton, . 
Quinoy, . 
Revere, 
SomervilJe, 
Waltham, . 
Woburn, . 

Ttfwne. 
Arlington, . 
Belmont, . 
Braintrce, . 
Brookline, . 
Canton, 
Conasset, . 
Dedham, . 

Hingham, . 

Hull, . 

Milton, 

Nahant, 

Needham, . 

IRandolpb], 

Saugua, 

Stoneham, 

SwampBcott, 

Wakofield, . 

Wellesley, . 

Weston, 

WeBtwood, 

Weymouth, 

Winchester, 

Wintbrop, . 




0.05 


2,562.57 

07.64 
471.34 

1,547.08 
257.00 


69.51 
064.17 
177.54 

082.00 
201.93 


463.72 


42.77 
15.50 


22.97 


4.24 
4.58 


17; 
70 


.56 

25 

68 

17 
07 


42 37 
4.03 
7.83 


110.89 

264.20 
234.54 

270.33 


19.59 


04.99 




: 

32 91 


25.59 


794.22 

43 84 

19.59 
59.53 
706.54 
177 54 
190.49 
2,505.48 
64.99 
4.03 
81.45 

7 83 
15.56 
67 84 

735.60 

234.54 

25.59 
1,818.01 

14.24 
257.00 

682.60 
3.10 
22.07 
79.17 
70 05 
117.94 
6.57 

261.93 
16.83 


.27 
83.31 


.60 


23.58 
44.50 

13.08 


8.10 


265.34 
4.95 

50.20 


72.37 


22.76 
61.35 


12.40 


7.57 


101.25 


.32 


114.50 


52.73 

2.47 




5.15 


7.91 
.13 


21.98 
15.16 


86.38 

9.97 

28.10 
20.43 


170.11 
98.78 
21.21 
31.26 
.32 
23.58 

318.00 
7.57 

114.50 

103.72 
70.37 
28.90 

22.04 

45.50 
20.43 

69.19 
15.16 

134.66 
81.66 

.15 
13.47 

J50. 80 
) 13 


964.33 
142.62 
21.21 
31.26 
19.91 
83.11 
1,024.54 
185.11 
304.99 
2,699.20 
144.39 
32.93 
81.45 
22.64 

53.33 
35.99 
67.84 
69.19 
735.60 

249.70 

25.59 

1,952.07 

81.06 

257.00 

682.75 

36.44 

117.04 

312.73 
16.96 


.015 

2.250 


1.31 
.07 


2.850 
.740 


.814 

.482 


4.45 
.38 

1.780 


1.510 


.72 
1.540 


.520 


.060 


4.320 


2.230 


- 


2.70 
.36 




.120 
.670 


.88 
.02 


.49 


1.563 

.303 

.848 

.473 


5.435 
2.083 

.814 
1.662 

.120 
1.516 
7.782 
1.060 
1.200 
4.680 
3.745 
1.423 

1.310 

2.248 
.473 

.800 
.490 

3.700 
2.230 

.060 
.774 

1.850 
.020 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 

7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 

28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 






6.05 


4,006.43 


1,845.77 1 403.72 1 58.33 


22.97 


23.06 


70 


51 


54.23 


922.59 


22.60 


64.90 


16.83 


32.91 


25.59 


9,175.67 


83.58 


23.24 


82.12 


126.88 


337.89 


72.37 


74.11 


12.40 


7.72 


101.25 


81.98 


183.09 


55.20 


13.47 


5.15 


8.04 


37.14 


144. 8S 1,1151.11 


10,626.73 


2.265 


1.38 


5.105 


5.253 


8.01 


1.510 


2.260 


.520 1.120 


4.320 


2.230 2.00 


3.00 


.774 


.690 


.90 


.98 


3.187 


45.564 





























































































































1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 35 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PARK 
ENGINEERING. 



November 24, 1920. 
Hon. James A. Bailey, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Dear Sir : — I beg to submit the following report of the work 
done under the direction of the engineering department of the Parks 
Division for the year ending November 30, 1920. 

Parkways. 

Alewife Brook Parkway. 

Construction of loam planting strips and sidewalks along the 
northerly section, formerly Powder House boulevard. Work was 
done by the forces of the Division. 

Blue Hills Parkway. 

Section of westerly or traffic roadway from Eliot Street to Brook 
Road resurfaced with bituminous concrete pavement under contract 
with Warren Brothers Company, Boston. Work was begun on 
August 24, 1920, and completed on September 4, 1920. Road was 
opened to public travel on September 4, 1920. 

Dedham Parkway. 

Preparation of plans of land to be conveyed by Tierney & Mullin 
for westerly section of the parkway. 

Plans and estimates for construction of above section. 

Grading of westerly section was done under contract with Powers 
Brothers, Brockton, Mass. About 5,000 cubic yards of material 
were excavated by steam shovel and moved for grading in another 
section of the parkway. 

Work of surfacing roadway and finishing slopes has been in prog- 
ress by forces of the Division. 

It is expected to complete the surfacing in the spring, so that the 
parkway may be opened to public travel if desired. 



36 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 



Furnace Brook Parkway. 

The work of grading and finishing section of Furnace Brook 
Parkway from Adams Street to Hancock Street under contract with 
Coleman Brothers, and which was in progress last fall, was sus- 
pended during the winter months. The work was resumed in 
April, 1920, and completed on August 10, 1920. The parkway was 
opened to public travel on August 14, 1920. 

The funds available permitted of the construction of only a tem- 
porary surface, the subgrade material being raked, rolled and oiled. 

Plans and estimates for construction of dam and tide gates at 
Black's Creek bridge have been prepared. The purpose of the con- 
struction of the dam is to retain the tidal waters in the large basin 
above Black's Creek bridge at an elevation slightly above half tide, 
so that the flats may be covered at all times, and boating and 
bathing facilities provided in the basin. 

Bids for this work were received on September 22, 1920, the 
lowest of which was considerably in excess of the engineer's esti- 
mates and in excess of the appropriation. All bids were rejected. 

Lynn Fells Parkway. 

Steel bridge, carrying the Boston & Maine Railroad over the 
parkway, has been painted under contract with Maurice M. Devine 
for furnishing labor, equipment and tools. 

Middlesex Fells Parkway. 

The section of the easterly or traffic road of Middlesex Fells 
Parkway from Wellington bridge to Revere Beach Parkway has 
been resurfaced with Portland cement concrete pavement. The 
work was done under contract with Simpson Brothers Corporation, 
and was laid by the "Hassam" method. The work was begun on 
September 9, 1920, and completed on October 19, 1920. The road 
was opened to traffic on October 22, 1920. 

The bridge over the Boston & Maine Railroad, Medford branch, 
has been painted under contract with Maurice M. Devine. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 37 

Mystic Valley Parkway. 

The section of Aberjona River known as Wedgemere Pond, be- 
tween Bacon Street and the Boston & Maine Railroad, which has 
been considered in unsanitary condition on account of shoaling, has 
been dredged by hydraulic process. A small plant has been assem- 
bled, partly with equipment belonging to the Commission, and 
partly with hired equipment, and the soft material pumped from 
the bed of the river and collected behind dikes in the shallow area. 
This dredging provides a depth of about 4 feet in the water areas, 
and fills the flats to an elevation well above the normal height of 
the water. This work was begun on August 24, 1920, and com- 
pleted on November 20, 1920. 

A section of Mystic Valley Parkway, about 1,500 feet long, has 
been resurfaced with bituminous macadam by the forces of the 
Division. 

Old Colony Parkway. 

Construction plans and specifications for the permanent Neponset 
bridge have been completed, and bids for the work were received on 
April 28, 1920. The bids were for alternative designs, both arch 
type and concrete girder type bridge. Four bids were received for 
the arch type and five for the girder type. The costs of each type 
were substantially the same, but the prices bid were about 50 per 
cent above the estimated cost, and about 75 per cent in excess of 
the appropriation. The excessive prices bid were evidently due to 
the high cost of materials and labor and unsettled conditions at the 
time bids were obtained. All bids were rejected. 

The temporary Neponset bridge has been repaired by laying new 
floor sheathing over its entire length. 

Lumber and piles removed from the old Neponset bridge and 
stored on the southerly bank of the river have been sold as second- 
hand material to the highest bidder, Aberthaw Construction Com- 
pany. 

On account of refusal of the Public Works Department of the 
Commonwealth to grant a license to this Commission to fill in tide- 
water and construct a culvert near Fox Point, Savin Hill, the work 
of filling with ashes and rubbish has been abandoned, and the con- 
tract with the Boston Development and Sanitary Company can- 
celed on March 23, 1920. 



38 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

On account of a complaint of the Boston Health Department of 
stagnant water on land of the Commonwealth, Old Colony Parkway, 
near junction of Mount Vernon Street and Columbia Road, it was 
necessary to do additional filling to remedy the condition. In No- 
vember, 1920, another contract was made with the Boston Develop- 
ment and Sanitary Company to furnish ashes and rubbish for fill- 
ing for this work, on the same terms and conditions as the previous 
contract. 

Revere Beach Parkivay. 

Considerable repair work has been done on the railroad bridges 
and bridge over the Maiden River, and all steel work painted. The 
work was done under contract with Lawler Brothers for the car- 
penter work, and Maurice M. Devine for the painting. 

West Roxbury Parkway. 

Work of constructing the parkway from Washington Street to 
Belgrade Avenue, which was begun on September 5, 1919, under 
contract with Rowe Contracting Company, was suspended during 
the winter months. Work was resumed on April 8, 1920, and com- 
pleted on October 16, 1920. The section from Washington Street 
to Anawan Avenue was opened to public travel on September 7, 
1920. 

Plans and specifications for the construction of the parkway from 
Belgrade Avenue to Centre Street, including bridge over the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, have been completed, and 
were transmitted to the railroad company on July 12, 1920, for their 
approval of the bridge plans. Approval has not yet been received. 

Winthrop Parkway. 

The work of building sea wall and grading section of Winthrop 
Parkway from Ocean Avenue to Endicott Street, under contract 
with Coleman Brothers, was begun in September, 1919, and sub- 
stantially completed by the first of the year. A few details of fin- 
ishing were postponed until the spring on account of the unfavorable 
conditions. The work was finally completed on May 20, 1920. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 39 

Resekvations. 
Blue Hills Reservation. 
The work of making survey and plans for road from Administra- 
tion Road to the summit of Chickatawbut Hill is in progress. 

Bunker Hill Reservation. 

Specifications were prepared and bids received for the repointing 
of the joints of the masonry of Bunker Hill Monument throughout 
its entire height. The contract was awarded to the lowest bidder, 
W. L. Waples Company, and the work was begun on June 11, 1920, 
and completed on September 27, 1920. All joints were cut out by 
pneumatic tools and repointed with waterproof Portland cement 
pointing. The roof joints were repointed by caulking with lead 
wool. 

Plans and specifications for the work of grading and surfacing for 
the restoration of the Bunker Hill Monument grounds have been 
prepared, and bids were received on August 11, 1920. Contract 
was made with James H. Fannon, the lowest bidder. The work 
was begun on September 7, 1920, and completed on November 18, 
1920. 

The funds available were not sufficient to do all the work neces- 
sary as recommended by the landscape architect and the engineer, 
and it is estimated that about $10,000 additional will be required. 

Charles River Reservation, Lower Basin. 

The work of rough grading the proposed drives along the southerly 
bank of the river from North Harvard Street to Western Avenue 
has been in progress. The material was furnished by the Cam- 
bridge Electric Light Company and the Cambridge Gas Light Com- 
pany at no expense to the Commonwealth. 

Repairs to damage by leakage of surface water through the roof 
of the underground comfort station on Charles River Embankment 
have been made by waterproofing the outside of the roof and re- 
plastering a portion of the interior. 

Estimates have been prepared of the cost of repairing and main- 
taining the park roads along the river in Cambridge, with a view 
to their transfer to this Commission, under authority of chapter 
509 of the Acts of 1920. 



40 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Charles River Reservation, Upper Division. 

The work of constructing Nonantum Road extension to Maple 
Street, Newton, under contract with A. G. Tomasello, was begun on 
August 28, 1919, and suspended during the winter season. The 
work was resumed on April 1, 1920, and completed on June 30, 
1920. The parkway was opened to public travel on July 13, 1920. 

Since the completion of this road the city of Newton has widened 
Maple Street which connects directly with the end of the river 
drive. This widening of Maple Street necessitates a slight widening 
at the end of Nonantum Road, and negotiations have just been 
completed for the acquirement of the necessary land from the abut- 
ting owner by the city of Newton for the Commonwealth. The 
land is provided by the city of Newton with the understanding that 
this Commission will do the work of widening the entrance. 

Papers have been passed for exchange of land between the United 
States War Department and the Commonwealth. The War De- 
partment has conveyed to the Commonwealth the area south of the 
Watertown Arsenal grounds, including North Beacon Street from 
the river to the Charles River Road, Watertown, in exchange for 
marsh land north of Arsenal Street on the westerly side of the river. 

Lynn Shore Reservation. 

Work of repairs to sea wall has been carried on as far as the 
funds available would permit. The work consists of building con- 
crete toe wall along the old concrete wall, where the masonry has 
disintegrated. 

On account of the excessively high costs of labor and materials, 
only a small section of the work could be completed with the amount 
appropriated, which was $5,000. There still remains considerable 
of this repair work to be done, and an item of $10,000 has been 
included in next year's budget. 

Middlesex Fells Reservation. 
The work of widening, straightening and improving South Border 
Road so that it might be safe for motor car travel, has been in 
progress by the forces of the Division, with the exception of rock 
excavation, which was done under contract with John A. Gaffey. 



^ 1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 41 

The original roadway surfacing was retained, except that the 
gravel surface was treated with asphaltic oil and sanded. 

This road, from Mystic Valley Parkway, Winchester, to Forest 
Street, Medford, was opened to motor traffic on August 7, 1920. 

A section of Woodland Road has been resurfaced with bituminous 
macadam by the forces of the Division. 

Nantasket Beach Reservation. 

Considerable work has been done by the forces of the Division 
toward the replacing of temporary wooden structures with concrete, 
thereby diminishing the cost of maintenance. 

The wooden promenade, between the hotel and the Tivoli shelter, 
has been replaced by a retaining wall and solid filling. 

Concrete curbs and steps have been built along the front of the 
pavilion. Concrete surface and curb have been built in the cafe 
and laundry courtyard. The sewerage system has been extended 
from the hotel to the bath-house. 

It has been customary for a great number of cars to park on the 
area south of the bath-house, and as the surface of this area is of 
a sandy nature, great difficulty is encountered in going in and out. 
Contract has just been made with John Smith, the lowest bidder, 
to furnish clay with which to cover the sand. This will provide a 
better surface and give greater facilities for parking. 

Winthrop Shore Reservation. 

The work of repairs of damage to sea wall, sidewalks, roadways 
and fences caused by the storm of last November, which was started 
immediately after the storm, has been completed. The work was 
done under contract with Coleman Brothers, and included the re- 
building of some of the granite masonry wall, resetting of granite 
coping, rebuilding of concrete sidewalks, pointing of joints in the 
masonry, and resetting of fences; also, twelve flights of wooden steps 
have been replaced. 

Repairs have been made to the bridge over the Boston, Revere 
Beach & Lynn Railroad. The work of repairs to steel work was 
done by the Boston Bridge Works, and the wood work by Lawler 
Brothers. 



42 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Drawbridges and Locks. 

The work of maintenance and operation of locks, sluices and draw- 
bridge at Charles River Dam has been under the direction, and su- 
pervision of this Department. In July, 1920, the operating force 
was reduced from 34 to 26 men. The work of ice breaking in the 
Charles River Basin and Broad and Lechmere canals, during the 
winter season of 1919-20, was exceptionally heavy on account of 
the severe weather. The boat owned by the Commission was able 
to keep the channels clear generally, by working two and three 
shifts. On a few occasions, when the boat was out of commission 
for a short time for repairs, outside assistance was obtained from 
the towboat companies. Extensive repairs were necessary to the 
boat after the winter's work, but she is now in first-class condition 
for work for the coming winter season. 

Extensive repairs have been made to the Saugus River bridge 
under contract with Lawler Brothers for furnishing labor and tools. 
The work has included the rebuilding of the entire floor of the 
drawbridge. 

Similar repairs have been made to the Maiden River bridge. 

Necessary repairs have been made and painting done on Welling- 
ton bridge by the bridge division forces. Extensive repairs will be 
necessary next year on the floors of the drawbridge, and some of the 
materials for this work have already been purchased. 

The work of maintenance and operation of the above-mentioned 
bridges and the Neponset temporary bridge and Cradock Lock have 
been under the direction of this Department. 

The following is a record of the traffic through the locks and draw- 
bridges during the year: — 



Charles Rtver Dam and Locks. 



Main Lock. 



Number of openings, . 
Number of vessels, 
Number of small boats, etc., 
Lumber (feet B. M.), . 
Coal (tons), . 
Oil (barrels), . 
Sand (tons), . 
Gravel (tons), 



3,716 

3,291 

2,712 

1,388,200 

217,582 

384,500 

141,345 

62,159 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 48. 



43 



Empty barrels, 
Rubble stone (tons), 
Granite (tons), 
Piling (feet B. M-), 
Piles, . . 
Water (tons), 

There were 2,258 drawbridge openings 



Number of openings, 
Number of vessels, 



Wellington Bridge. 



20,502 

5,135 

4,779 

207,000 

1,220 

925 



76 

98 



Number of openings, 
Number of vessels, 



Malden River Bridge. 



450 

815 



Number of openings, 
Number of vessels, 



Saugus River Bridge. 



199 
270 



Cradock Lock. 



Number of openings, . 

Number of boats, . 

Number of boats over rollway, 



701 

1,071 

90 



Temporary Neponset Bridge. 



Number of openings, 
Number of vessels, 



433 
703 



General. 

Work of road repairs and maintenance in the various divisions 
has been done by the forces of the Division under the supervision 
and direction of this Department, and generally consists of surface 
treatments with tar and asphaltic oil, and patching with these same 
materials. 

On account of increased cost of street lighting by naphtha lamps, 
the lighting has been discontinued in sections of the parkways 
which are located through unsettled districts and where few pedes- 
trians travel at night. Three hundred and fifty-one lamps have 
been discontinued. 

Notice has been received of the further increase in cost for the 
coming year of the naphtha lamps, and the substitution of electric 



44 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

lighting systems for the naphtha lamps still operated seems ad- 
visable. 

All bridges under care and control of this Commission have been 
inspected twice during the year, and report made with recommen- 
dations and estimates of cost of repairs. 

This Department has issued permits for various work in the park- 
ways and reservations, and supervised and inspected the work. 

Numerous surveys have been made for the establishment of re- 
striction and boundary lines where building operations are in progress 
on abutting land. v 

Very truly yours, 



Dec. 1, 1920. 



JOHN R. RABLIN, 

Director of Park Engineering. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



45 



Table 1. — Data relating to Metropolitan Park System. 



Areas of Reservations and Parkways. 



Reservations : — 
Blue Hills, '.-.... 
Bunker Hill, 
Middlesex Fells, . 
Stony Brook, 
Beaver Brook, 
Hart's Hill, . . . . 
Hemlock Gorge, . 
Charles River, 
Mystic River, 
Neponset River, . 
King's Beach and Lynn Shore, 
Revere Beach, 
Winthrop Shore, . . 
Quincy Shore, 
Nantasket Beach, 

Total, .... 



Acres. 

4,906.43 

6.05 

1,845.77 

463.72 
58.33 
22.97 
23.06 

709.51 
54.23 

922.59 
22.69 
64.99 
16.83 
32.91 
25.59 



9,175.67 



Parkways : — 
Hammond Pond, 
Blue Hills, . 
Old Colony, . 
Woburn, 
Middlesex Fells, 
Revere Beach, 
Mystic Valley, 
Neponset River, 
Fresh Pond, . 
Lynn Fells, . 
Furnace Brook, 
Nahant Beach, 
Lynnway, 
Winthrop, 
Dedham, 
Alewife Brook, 
West Roxbury, 
Quannapowitt, 
Total, . 



183.69 
83.58 
55.20 
23.24 
82.12 

126.88 

337.89 

74.11 

12.40 

7.72 

101.25 

81.98 

5.15 

8.04 

37.14 

144.88 
72.37 
13.47 



1,451.11 



Grand total, reservations and parkways, 



10,626.78 



46 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Lengths of Formal Roads constructed. 



Reservations : 
Charles River, 
Lynn Shore, 
Quincy Shore, 
Revere Beach, 
Stony Brook, 
Winthrop Shore, 



Parkways : — 
Alewife Brook, 
Blue Hills, '. 
Fresh Pond, 
Furnace Brook, 
Lynn Fells, 
Lynnway, . 
Middlesex Fells, 
Mystic Valley, 
Nahant Beach, 
Neponset River, 
Revere Beach, 
West Roxbury, 
Winthrop, . 
Woburn, 



Double 

Roadways 

(Miles). 



1.46 



4.10 



1.45 



Single 

Roadwavs 

(Miles). 

5.28 

.96 
2.24 
2.70 
2.34 
1.07 



.70 
1.61 

.50 
4.06 
1.05 

.68 
1.77 
6.17 

.50 

.53 
3.73 

.83 

.49 
1.38 



7. or 



*Equivalent in miles of single roadway, 

Highways transferred by or taken from cities and towns : — 
Alewife Brook Parkway, . 
Blue Hills Reservation, . 
Charles River Reservation, 
Middlesex Fells Reservation, . 
Nantasket Beach Reservation, 



Miles. 

.44 
1.23 

.39 
6.63 

.71 



Total 
(Miles). 



14.69 



24.00 



14.02 



9.40 



Grand total, . 
AD above roads open to automobile traffic. 



62.11 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



47 



Lengths of Carriage Roads in Reservations. 

Blue Hills Reservation, . 
Middlesex Fells Reservation, 
Stony Brook Reservation, 
Beaver Brook Reservation, 
Charles River Reservation, 



Total, 

Of the above roads 10.19 miles are open to automobile traffic. 

Lights in Parkways and Reservations. 

Alewife Brook Parkway (arc lights), 

Blue Hills Parkway (Welsbach gas), 

Charles River Reservation, Upper Division, Soldiers' Field Road 

senal Road and North Beacon Street (electric), 
Charles River Reservation, Boston Embankment (electric), . 
Charles River Reservation, Lower Basin, Dam and Lock (electric) 
Fresh Pond Parkway (electric) , 
Furnace Brook Parkway (Welsbach gas) , 
Lynn Fells Parkway (Welsbach naphtha) , 
Lynn Shore Reservation (electric), 

Lynnway (electric), 

Middlesex Fells Parkway (Welsbach naphtha) 
Middlesex Fells Reservation (Welsbach naphtha 
Middlesex Fells Reservation (electric) , 
Mystic Valley Parkway (Welsbach naphtha) , 
Nahant Beach Parkway (electric), 
Nantasket Beach Reservation (electric), 
Old Colony Parkway (arc) , . . . . 
Quincy Shore Reservation (Welsbach gas), . 
Quincy Shore Reservation (electric), 
Revere Beach Parkway (Welsbach naphtha) , 
Revere Beach Parkway (arc) , . 
Revere Beach Reservation (Welsbach gas), 
Revere Beach Reservation (electric) , . 
Winthrop Parkway (Welsbach naphtha) , 
Winthrop Shore Reservation (electric), 



)', 



Ar- 



Total. 



Miles. 

30.93 
17.85 

1.60 
.22 

3.70 

54.30 



Lights. 

8 
80 

16 

106 

16 

15 

*45 

17 

28 

10 

262 

29 

48 

52 

2 7 

3 . 4 30 

3 

5 56 

3 

165 

5 

53 

6 36 

6 
7 

1,103 



1 Eighty-six lights to October 1. , 

2 Five additional lights in summer. 

3 Twenty additional lights in summer. 

4 Three additional lights in summer south of bath-house, near wall. 
6 Seventy-eight lights to October 1. 

6 Three hundred and forty-eight additional lights in summer. 



48 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Lynn Shore, 
Nahant Beach, . 
Revere Beach, . 
Winthrop Shore, 
Nantasket Beach, 
Quincy Shore, . 



Miles of Seashore 



Miles. 

1.50 
3.92 
2.74 
1.71 
1.02 
2.19 



Total, 13.08 

Lengths of Sea Walls. Miles. 

Lynn Shore, 1.30 

Revere Beach at Northern Circle, 

Revere Beach at Eliot Circle, 

Revere Beach, shore protection, bath-house shelter to Revere Street 

shelter, 

Revere Beach, shore protection, south of Northern Circle, 

Winthrop Shore, bridge to Great Head, 

Winthrop Shore, bridge to Grover's Cliff, 

Quincy Shore Reservation, southerly end, 

Nantasket Beach Reservation, 

Winthrop Parkway, near Leverett Avenue, Revere, 

Total, 4.07 



Charles River, . 
Mystic River, . 
Neponset River, 
Alewife Brook, . 



Miles of River Bank. 



.08 


.15 


.29 


.28 


1.04 


.23 


.15 


.43 


.12 


4.07 


Miles. 


28.58 


8.16 


15.86 


4.50 



Total, 57.10 



Bridges. 



Reinforced concrete bridges, 
Steel bridges, 
Wooden bridges, 
Drawbridges, 
Footbridges, 



11 
8 

l 5 
5 

12 



Total, 



Culverts. 
Reinforced concrete and other masonry culverts, 



41 



37 



1 One-half of Wellington bridge rebuilt with concrete girders. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT - No. 48. 



49 



Dams. 

Beaver Brook Reservation, small wooden dams, 

Charles River Reservation, Charles River Basin tidal dam, 1,200 feet 

in length, 

Charles River Reservation, small stone dam in branch below Washing- 
ton Street, Newton Lower Falls, 

Charles River Reservation, reinforced concrete dam at Washington 

Street, Newton Lower Falls, 200 feet in length, 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, small stone masonry dam with stop planks, 

in gorge, 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, small reinforced concrete dam on East 

Branch of river, Newton Upper Falls, 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation, reinforced concrete dam in Charles River 

at Boylston Street, Newton Upper Falls, 90 feet in length, . 
Mystic River Reservation, reinforced concrete tidal dam at Cradock 

bridge, 100 feet in length; weirs, 400 feet in length, .... 

Total, . 



Lock Gates, Sluice Gates and Tide Gates. 

Charles River Reservation, Charles River Basin tidal dam, 6 lock gates, 

13 sluice gates, 43 tide gates. 
Mystic River Reservation, Cradock bridge tidal dam, 2 lock gates, 4 

sluice gates, 8 tide gates. 
Quincy Shore Reservation, 8 tide gates. 
Revere Beach Parkway, 1 tide gate. 



Blue Hills Division, . 
Middlesex Fells Division, 
Nantasket Beach Division, 
Charles River Reservation, 
Fresh Pond Parkway, 



Police Signal System. 



Total, 



Miles. 

30i 

18J 

2| 
10 

1 

2 

61} 



Revere Beach Division police signal system, serving 11 miles of parkways 
and reservations, and Middlesex Fells Division, serving 1^ miles of parkway, on 
wires leased from the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company. Two 
miles of wire in Blue Hills Reservation leased from the New England Telephone 
and Telegraph Company. 



50 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



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1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



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1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



53 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT, PARKS DIVISION. 



Loan Appropriations. 

The appropriations heretofore made in the form of loans, with 
accretions thereto, are as follows : — 



Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund. 

Original appropriation, chapter 407, Acts of 1893, . 

General appropriation, chapter 483, Acts of 1894, . 

Charles River Act, chapter 509, Acts of 1894, 

General appropriation, chapter 305, Acts of 1895, . 

General appropriation, chapter 466, Acts of 1896, . 

-General appropriation, chapter 464, Acts of 1897, . 

General appropriation, chapter 530, Acts of 1898, . 

Revere Beach Bath-house Act, chapter 142, Acts of 1899, 

General appropriation, chapter 406, Acts of 1899, . 

Charles River Improvement Act, chapter 465, Acts of 1900, 

Fuller's Wharf Act, chapter 467, Acts of 1900, 

General appropriation, chapter 445, Acts of 1901, . 

Mystic River Bridge Act, chapter 492, Acts of 1901, . 

General appropriation, chapter 290, Acts of 1903, . 

Newton Upper Falls Bridge Act, chapter 391, Acts of 1903, 

Continuing appropriation, chapter 429, Acts of 1903, . 

Nahant Beach Bath-house Act, chapter 326, Acts of 1904, 

Reimbursing loan for moth expense, chapter 486, Acts of 1906, 

Purification of Mystic River, Alewife Brook and adjacent water- 
courses, ponds and drainage areas, chapter 529, Acts of 1906, 

Additional appropriation for purification of Mystic River, etc 
chapter 529, Acts of 1907, 

Mystic River and Winthrop Shore Act, chapter 652, Acts of 1908, 

Charles River Land Act, chapter 628, Acts of 1910, and chapter 
439, Acts of 1911, 

Alewife Brook Purification Act, chapter 458, Acts of 1911, . 

Work for unemployed, chapter 4, General Acts of 1915, 

Weston Bridge Act, chapter 368, Special Acts of 1915, . 



$1,000,000 00 

500,000 00 

300,000 00 

500,000 00 

1,000,000 00 

500,000 00 

1,000,000 00 

125,000 00 

300,000 00 

50,000 00 

30,000 00 

450,000 00 

200,000 00 

125,000 00 

40,000 00 

1,500,000 00 

70,000 00 

50,000 00 

100,000 00 

25,000 00 
70,000 00 

143,043 96 
15,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 



1, 193,043 96 



54 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



To provide for interest and sinking fund requirements to 1900, 

chapter 311, Acts of 1897, $900,000 00 



Total amount of loans, ........ $9,093,043 96 

Amounts received from sales of buildings, receipts from bath- 
houses, fines, etc., 198,942 81 



Total, $9,291,986 77 



Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II 

Original boulevard, chapter 288, Acts of 1894, 
General appropriation, chapter 472, Acts of 1896, . 
General appropriation, chapter 521, Acts of 1897, . 
Saugus Bridge Act, chapter 547, Acts of 1898, 
' General appropriation, chapter 428, Acts of 1899, . 
Mattapan Bridge Act, chapter 443, Acts of 1900, . 
Winchester Act, chapter 444, Acts of 1900, 
Revere Beach Parkway Act, chapter 445, Acts of 1900, 
General appropriation, chapter 172, Acts of 1902, . 
General appropriation, chapter 359, Acts of 1903, . 
Continuing appropriation, chapter 419, Acts of 1903, 
Alewife Brook and Fresh Pond Parkway Act, chapter 651, Acts of 

1908, 

Continuing appropriation, chapter 699, Acts of 1912, 
Wellington Bridge Act, chapter 794, Acts of 1914, . 
Work for unemployed, chapter 5, Special Acts of 1915, 
Alewife Brook Parkway construction, chapter 243, General Acts 

of 1915, 

Neponset Bridge Act, chapter 300, General Acts of 1915, 
Wellington Bridge Act, chapter 178, General Acts of 1916, 
Improvement of lands in Arlington, chapter 186, General Acts of 

1916, 

Parkway connecting Blue Hills Reservation and Granite Street 

Braintree, chapter 235, General Acts of 1916, 
Construction of Dedham Parkway, chapter 237, General Acts of 

1916, 

Additional appropriation for Neponset Bridge construction, chap- 
ter 220, General Acts of 1917, .... 
Settlement of claims for land, Furnace Brook Parkway, chapter 

316, General Acts of 1917, 

Completion of boulevards and roadways, chapter 175, General 

Acts of 1919, 

Additional appropriation for Neponset Bridge construction, chap- 
ter 238, General Acts of 1919, .... 



$500,000 00 
500,000 00 

1,000,000 00 
100,000 00 
500,000 00 
75,000 00 
50,000 00 
200,000 00 
450,000 00 
110,000 00 

1,500,000 00 

50,000 00 

1,000,000 00 

115,000 00 

50,000 00 

35,000 00 

350,000 00 

11,000 00 

20,000 00 

10,000 00 

10,000 00 

100,000 00 

8,000 00 

250,000 00 

170,000 00 

$7,164,000 00 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



55 



To provide for interest and sinking fund requirements to 1900, 

chapter 311, Acts of 1917, $100,000 00 



Total amount of loans, 
Receipts from sales, etc., 

Total, . . . 



$7,264,000 00 
36,123 82 

$7,300,123 82 



Nantasket Beach Loan. 
Appropriation, chapter 464, Acts of 1899, 
Appropriation, chapter 456, Acts of 1901, 

Total amount of loans, 

Receipts from rents, etc., ...... 

Total, 



$600,000 00 
100,000 00 

$700,000 00 

5,881 50 

$705,881 50 



Charles River Basin Loan. 

Bonds issued for 1904, . 
Bonds issued for 1905, . 
Bonds issued for 1906, . 
Bonds issued for 1907, . 
Bonds issued for 1908, . 
Bonds issued for 1909, . 
Bonds issued for 1910, . 
Bonds issued for 1911, . 

Appropriation, chapter 539, Acts of 1913, 

Driveway, Brooks Street to Charlesbank Road, chapter 188, 
General Acts of 1915, 

Total amount of bonds, 

Receipts added to loan, . 



$250,000 00 
400,000 00 
600,000 00 

1,150,000 00 
400,000 00 
850,000 00 
475,000 00 
300,000 00 
40,000 00 

35,000 00 

$4,500,000 00 
9,368 91 



Total, . $4,509,368 91 



Expenditures from Loans. 
The following tables show the total amount expended in each 
of the foregoing loans, the total cost of each reservation and park- 
way to Dec. 1, 1920, and the amount charged by the Auditor's de- 
partment to meet the sinking fund and interest requirements previous 
to Jan. 1, 1900. The item of "Miscellaneous" in these tables in- 
cludes cost of construction of roads, buildings and of all other work 
of construction, and all other charges against these loans except 



56 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

those for land, general expenses, sinking fund and cost of mainte- 
nance required by law to be charged to loans up to 1897. The total 
charges for maintenance to 1897, general expenses and sinking fund 
are given separately at the end of the tables. The amounts ex- 
pended from these loans for the fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1920, are 
stated in tables on pages 63 to 65. The total amounts charged to 
those loans are as follows : — 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund. 

Land, $5,393,648 66 

Miscellaneous, including construction of roads, buildings, etc., 3,395,281 79 

General expense, '. 163,371 12 

Maintenance to Jan. 1, 1897, sinking fund assessments to Jan. 

1, 1900, and interest, 290,326 56 

Transfer to Serial Bond Loan, 3,601 10 



$9,246,229 23 



Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II. 

Land, ... $2,287,750 49 

Miscellaneous, including construction of roads, buildings, etc., . 4,178,949 96 

General expense, 107,090 19 

Sinking fund assessments to Jan. 1, 1900, and one-half interest, 59,195 89 



1,632,986 53 



Nantasket Beach Loan. 

Land, $603,329 57 

Miscellaneous, including construction of buildings, etc., . . 102,551 93 



$705,881 50 



Expenditures to Dec. 1, 1920. 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund. 

Blue Hills Reservation : — 

Land, $363,357 29 

Miscellaneous, 307,058 66 



$670,415 95 



Middlesex Fells Reservation : — 

Land, $691,162 69 

Miscellaneous, 294,557 47 



985,720 16 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



57 



Revere Beach Reservation: — 
Land, .... 
Miscellaneous, 

Stony Brook Reservation : — 
Land, .... 
Miscellaneous, 

Beaver Brook Reservation: — 
Land, .... 
Miscellaneous, 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation : - 
Land, .... 
Miscellaneous, 

Charles River Reservation : — 
Land, .... 
Miscellaneous, 

Neponset River Reservation : - 
Land, .... 
Miscellaneous, 

Mystic River Reservation: — ■ 
Land, .... 
Miscellaneous, 

Lynn Shore Reservation : — 
Land, .... 
Miscellaneous, 

Quincy Shore Reservation : — 
Land, .... 
Miscellaneous, 

Winthrop Shore Reservation : - 
Land, . . . 
Miscellaneous, 



,162,947 67 
800,999 04 



$281,243 87 
76,810 67 



$29,819 29 
24,437 35 



$53,254 00 
15,543 94 



,569,391 51 
340,921 43 



$233,473 04 
46,418 97 



$243,733 21 
380,815 51 



$361,199 29 
243,580 01 



$73,726 26 
198,160 63 



$51,067 32 
170,560 99 



,963,946 71 



358,054 54 



54,256 64 



68,797 94 



1,910,312 94 



279,892 01 



624,548 72 



604,779 30 



271,886 89 



221,628 31 



58 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Hart's Hill Reservation : — 

Land, $10,000 00 

Miscellaneous, 202 35 

$10,202 35 

King's Beach Reservation : — 

Land, $24,297 21 

Miscellaneous, 1,551 63 

25,848 84 

West Roxbury Parkway : — 

Land, $244,976 01 

Miscellaneous, 8,313 67 

253,289 68 

Wellington Bridge : — 

Miscellaneous, $185,317 42 

185,317 42 

Nahant Beach Bath-house : — 

Miscellaneous, $67,794 58 

■ 67,794 58 

Boylston Street Bridge : — 

Miscellaneous, $45,838 57 

45,838 57 . 

Alewif e Brook Purification : — 

Miscellaneous, $136,398 90 

136,398 90 

Weston Bridge : — 

Miscellaneous, $50,000 00 

50,000 00 

General expense, 163,371 12 

$8,952,301 57 
Sinking fund requirements to 1896, .... $18,980 18 
Care and maintenance to July 1, 1896, . . . 85,813 46 
Care and maintenance, July 1, 1896, to Jan. 1, 1897, 19,604 06 
Sinking fund assessment for 1897, .... 63,630 70 
Sinking fund assessment for 1898, .... 9,755 55 
Sinking fund assessment for 1899, .... 64,224 00 

Interest, 28,318 61 

Transfer to Serial Bond Loan (unexpended balance 

Alewif e Brook purification appropriation), . 3,601 10 

293,927 66 

Total charged to Dec. 1, 1920, $9,246,229 23 

Balance Dec. 1, 1920, • . . 45,757 54 

$9,291,986 77 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 48. 59 



Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II. 

Blue Hills Parkway : — 

Land, $133,505 02 

Miscellaneous, 269,513 47 

$403,018 49 

Middlesex Fells Parkway : — 

Land, $263,687 60 

Miscellaneous, 613,667 39 

877,354 99 

Mystic Valley Parkway : — 

Land, $203,990 91 

Miscellaneous, 425,422 56 

629,413 47 

Revere Beach Parkway : — 

Land, $537,445 51 

Miscellaneous, 869,565 65 

1,407,011 16 

Neponset River Parkway: — 

Land, $83,941 75 

Miscellaneous, 36,100 54 

120,042 29 

Fresh Pond Parkway : — 

Land, $44,086 25 

Miscellaneous, 31,635 58 

75,721 83 

Furnace Brook Parkway : — 

Land, $173,897 77 

Miscellaneous, 271,760 64 

445,658 41 

Nahant Beach Parkway : — 

Land, $80,940 78 

Miscellaneous, 76,260 11 

157,200 89 

Lynn Fells Parkway : — 

Land, $40,468 46 

Miscellaneous, 126,373 84 

166,842 30 

Winthrop Parkway : — 

Land, $133,390 73 

Miscellaneous, 90,011 11 

223,401 84 

Alewif e Brook Parkwaj r : — 

Land, $144,497 74 

Miscellaneous, . . . . . . . 45,705 13 

190,202 87 



60 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Charles River Speedway : — 

Miscellaneous, $521,348 66 

$521,348 66 

Blue Hills roads: — 

Miscellaneous, . $8,742 06 

» 8,742 06 

Middlesex Fells roads : — 

Miscellaneous, $79,431 67 

79,431 67 

Stony Brook roads : — 

Miscellaneous, . . $37,183 45 

37,183 45 

Lynnway : — 

Land, $20,500 00 

Miscellaneous, 124,368 29 

144,868 29 

Spy Pond Parkway : — 

Miscellaneous, $89 04 

89 04 

Old Colony Parkway : — 

Land, $299,821 36 

Miscellaneous, 82,266 28 

382,087 64 

Woburn Parkway : — 

Land, $3,958 75 

Miscellaneous, 52,038 32 

55,997 07 

Dedham Parkway : — 

Land, $22,027 01 

Miscellaneous, . . . . . . . 30,968 24 

52,995 25 

Hammond Pond Parkway : — 

Land, . $94,965 85 

Miscellaneous, 5,061 45 

100,027 30 

Quannapowitt Parkway : — 

Land, $6,625 00 

Miscellaneous, 1,831 82 

8,456 82 

West Roxbury Parkway : — 

Miscellaneous, $49,639 93 

49,639 93 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



61 



Vose's Grove : — 
Miscellaneous, 



Wellington Bridge: 
Miscellaneous, 



Neponset Bridge : — 
Miscellaneous, 



Arlington Parkway: — 
Miscellaneous, 



Nonantum Road: ■ — 
Miscellaneous, 



West Street, Braintree: 
Miscellaneous, 

General expense, . 



$980 08 



$120,796 40 



$163,468 20 



^,035 12 



$39,295 08 



1,389 85 



Sinking fund requirements for 1896, 
Sinking fund requirements for 1897, 
Sinking fund requirements for 1898, 
Sinking fund requirements for 1899, 
One-half interest, .... 



Total charged to Dec. 1, 1920, 
Balance Dec. 1, 1920, . 



$980 08 



120,796 40 



163,468 20 



4,035 12 



39,295 08 



1,389 85 
107,090 19 

1,573,790 64 



$3,650 03 
14,057 10 
3,765 08 
15,396 00 
22,327 68 



Nantasket Beach Loan. 



Land, 
Miscellaneous, 



59,195 89 

1,632,986 53 
667,137 29 

',300,123 82 



$603,329 57 
102,551 93 



Total charged to Dec. 1, 1920, $705,881 50 



62 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Charles River Basin Loan. 
Expended from beginning of work to Dec. 1, 1920, . . . $4,472,747 22 

The above amount has been distributed as follows: — 

Administration, $108,110 16 

Dam, 1,118,772 60 

Lock, 724,142 64 

Temporary bridge and approaches, .... 184,895 36 

Drawbridge, 100,371 06 

Highway, 55,557 85 

Dredging, pile-driving and protection work in 

Basin, 179,881 35 

Broad Canal, 117,251 64 

Lechmere Canal, 53,388 87 

Boston Embankment, 895,213 92 

Boston Marginal Conduit, 635,511 96 

Cambridge Marginal Conduit, 99,472 48 

Elimination of malarial mosquitoes, . . . . 1,173 68 

Landing piers, 7,667 99 

Float anchorage, 23 90 

Police signal system, 9,847 56 

Improvement of south bank and driveway, . . 31,506 09 

Service sheds, 19,198 95 

Mortuary, 1,560 66 

Otter Street widening, 34,762 82 

Landing near Faneuil Station, 1,057 83 

Alterations and improvements in stable and stable 

yard, 2,052 15 

Shelters, 2,615 19 

Rent of land, 2 00 

Maintenance, 88,708 51 

$4,472,747 22 

Metropolitan Parks Trust Fund. 

Receipts, $40,287 33 

Expenditures, 38,106 50 

Balance Dec. 1, 1920, . ■ $2,180 83 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 63 

Detailed Statement. 

Expenditures Dec. 1, 1919, to Dec. 1, 1920. 
Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund. 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, $9,093,043 96 

Receipts added to loan before June 1, 1901, 198,942 81 



$9,291,986 77 
Expenditures. 
Charles River Reservation: — 

Legal $200 00 

Claims, .....:... 250 00 

$450 00 

Mystic River Reservation: — 

Land, 850 00 

$1,300 00 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1919, 9,244,929 23 

9,246,229 23 

Balance, . $45,757 54 



Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II. 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II, $7,264,000 00 

Receipts from sales, etc 36,123 82 

$7,300,123 82 
Expenditures. 
Furnace Brook Parkway: — 
Construction: — 
Contract, Coleman Brothers, . . . . $25,409 63 
Labor and materials, 2,593 00 

$28,002 63 

Engineering: — 

Services, . . $2,519 12 

Expenses, 453 44 

2,972 56 

$30,975 19 

Nahant Beach Parkway: — : 

Labor and materials, . . . . . 245 98 

Winthrop Parkway: — 

Land $475 00 

Construction: — 

Contract, Coleman Brothers $15,867 68 

Labor and materials, 1,127 68 

16,995 36 

Engineering: — 

Services, $1,085 93 

Expenses, 99 44 

1,185 37 

18,655 73 

Middlesex Fells Roads: — 

Construction: — 

Labor and materials, $14,493 14 

Legal, 75 00 

14,568 14 

Amounts carried forward, $64,445 04 $7,300,123 82 



64 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Amounts brought forward $64,445 04 $7,300,123 82 

Old Colony Parkway: — 

Land $2,872 10 

Filling material, 9,951 23 

Labor, 262 18 

Engineering: — 

Services, $626 90 

Expenses, 20 45 

647 35 

Legal 400 00 

Advertising, 9 00 

14,141 86 

Dedham Parkway: — 

Land $11,500 00 

Construction: — 

Contract, Powers Company, .... $2,826 25 

Labor and materials, 4,616 60 

7,442 85 

Engineering: — 

Services, $650 32 

Expenses 152 60 

802 92 

Legal 30 00 

19,775 77 

West Roxbury Parkway: — 

Construction: — 

Contract, Rowe Contracting Company, . $35,529 24 
Labor and materials, 5,577 86 

$41,107 10 

Engineering: — 

Services, $3,548 80 

Expenses, 199 10 

3,747 90 

44,855 00 

Neponset Bridge: — 

Construction: — 

Labor and materials, $6,713 33 

Engineering: — 

Services „ $3,046 02 

Expenses, 680 03 

3,726 05 

Consulting engineers, 2,419 25 

Rental of land, 500 00 

13,358 63 

Nonantum Road: — 

Construction: — 

Contract, A. G. Tomasello, .... $33,835 88 
Labor and materials, 2,996 88 

$36,832 76 

Engineering: — 

Services $1,221 20 

Expenses, 48 71 

1,269 91 38,102 67 

$194,678 97 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1919, 6,438,307 56 

6,632,986 53 



Balance $667,137 29 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 65 



North Beacon Street Bridge Loan. 

Chapter 780, Acts of 1914, . .. ....... $175,00000 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1919, . . . . . . 174,853 50 

Balance $146 50 

Charles River Basin Loan. 

Total amount of loan, . . . .$4,500,000 00 

Receipts added to loan, . . ... . . 9,368 91 

Total $4,509,368 91 

Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1919, . . . . . 4,472,747 22 

Balance, . $36,621 69 

Metropolitan Parks System Maintenance. 

Appropriation Dec. 1, 1919, to Dec. 1, 1920 $705,477 39 

Expenditures. 
General expense: — 
Police: — 

Payrolls $163,154 13 

Miscellaneous, 20,374 71 

$183,528 84 

Salaries : — 

Commissioners, . . . . . . $2,500 00 

General office . 10,054 84 

Engineering department, . . . . 12,249 61 

24,804 45 

Rent, lighting and care of offices, . . . . . . 3,980 02 

Engineering: — 

Office supplies, . . $1,018 18 

Automobile expense, . . . . . 555 96 

1,574 14 

Office supplies, 1,659 56 

Stationery and printing, 833 58 

Telephones, 441 84 

Maps and books, . . 104 21 

Traveling, 36 66 

$216,963 30 

Blue Hills Reservation: — 

General labor, • $48,944 59 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor $37,203 36 

Supplies 10,622 50 

47,825 86 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, $301 11 

Supplies, 2,286 25 

— 2,587 36 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 9,721 89 

Keep of horses 7,106 79 

General supplies, 5,312 47 

Telephones, . 368 21 

Express and freight, 351 47 

Architects' services, 200 00 

Water rates, 178 47 

Amounts carried forward, $122,597 11 $216,963 30 $705,477 39 



66 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Amounts brought forward, $122,597 11 $216,963 30 $705,477 39 

Lighting buildings, 168 59 

Stationery and printing, 120 77 

Physicians' services, etc., 113 55 

Repairs, 55 65 

Postage 37 50 

Demurrage, 6 00 

123,099 17 

Middlesex Fells Reservation: — 

General labor, $32,854 46 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor $25,860 28 

Supplies 3,201 09 

29,061 37 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, 8,392 53 

General supplies 4,290 40 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 2,851 13 

Keep of horses 2,740 54 

Repairs, 489 16 

Lighting buildings 427 00 

Telephones, 374 55 

Stationery and printing, . 204 30 

Water rates, 54 90 

Rent, 45 00 

Express and freight, 39 31 

Postage 34 00 

Physicians' services, . 33 50 

Traveling 9 23 

81,901 38 

Revere Beach Reservation: — 

General labor $37,341 63 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, $1,062 54 

Supplies 2,315 57 

3,378 11 

General supplies, 5,985 33 

Street lighting 5,144 54 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 3,486 86 

Keep of horses, 1,789 44 

Lighting buildings, 628 79 

Telephones, . 488 96 

Water rates 255 77 

Stationery and printing, 132 57 

Repairs, 112 87 

Postage 41 17 

Express 20 71 

58,806 75 

Stony Brook Reservation: — 

General labor, $3,861 00 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor $2,530 90 

Supplies 3,104 08 

5,634 98 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, $250 09 

Supplies 240 00 

490 09 



Amounts carried forward $9,986 07 $480,770 60 $705,477 39 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



67 



12,896 77 



3,679 65 



Amounts brought forward, $9,986 07 $480,770 60, $705,477 39 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 2,750 00 

Keep of horses, 105 50 

Telephones, 43 30 

Repairs, 11 90 

Beaver Brook Reservation: — 

General labor, $1,834 19 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor $902 63 

Supplies 172 70 

1,075 33 

General supplies, . 621 44 

Telephones 52 95 

Water rates, 50 70 

Stationery and printing, 29 26 

Lighting buildings, 12 40 

Express and freight, 1 88 

Traveling, 1 50 

Charles River Upper Division: — • 

General labor, $28,675 01 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor, . ' $7,728 23 

Supplies, 2,925 60 

10,653 83 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, . . . . • >. . . . $1,580 95 
Supplies, 5,288 97 

6,869 92 

General supplies, 12,826 52 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 6,909 35 

Keep of horses, 3,149 94 

Lighting, 1,160 35 

Police boats, 638 28 

Telephones, 455 89 

Lighting buildings, . 389 46 

Stationery and printing, 233 28 

Use of snowplow, 210 45 

Water rates 191 16 

Cork buoys, 129 36 

200-gallon tank 60 00 

Physicians' services, etc., 53 00 

Traveling 32 92 

Express and freight, 30 68 

Postage, 24 50 

Repairs 18 30 

Riverside Recreation Grounds: — 

General labor, $3,706 94 

General supplies, 2,889 95 

Lighting buildings, 192 63 

Rental of sewer, 162 90 

Telephones, . . . - 103 83 

Water rates 54 20 

Electric power, 51 92 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 27 37 

Repairs, 21 22 

Physicians' services, etc., 17 00 

Amounts carried forward $7,227 96 $570,059 22 $705,477 39 



72,712 20 



68 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Amounts brought forward, $7,227 96 $570,059 22 $705,477 39 

Express and freight, 10 55 

Keep of horses, 2 38 

Postage, 1 00 

7,241 89 

Neponset River Reservation: — 

General labor, $98 90 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor, $455 84 

Supplies, 900 00 

1,355 84 

Telephones, 68 87 

1,523 61 

Mystic River Reservation. — 

General labor, $15,740 45 

General supplies, 1,259 87 

Electric power, 375 00 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 208 76 

Repairs 106 70 

Street lighting 93 61 

Telephones, 53 94 

Water rates, 6 60 

Keep of horses, .......... 5 00 

Postage, 3 50 

Traveling, 2 24 

17,855 67 

Lynn Shore Reservation: — 

General labor, $8,745 27 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, $720 11 

Supplies, . . 2,062 27 

2,782 38 

General supplies .... 3,007 83 

Street lighting, 2,520 00 

Automobile expense, 236 39 

Water rates 17 60 

17,309 47 

Quincy Shore Reservation: — 

General labor, $9,177 93 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Supplies 2,753 18 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, 2,209 08 

Street lighting, 2,374 93 

General supplies 1,525 45 

Auto expense, ■ 887 25 

Telephones 59 61 

Water rates, 45 84 

Lighting buildings, 19 68 

Repairs, 11 60 

19,064 55 

Winthrop Shore Reservation : — 

General labor $8,124 08 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, $228 85 

Supplies 258 29 

487 14 

General supplies, 2,302 02 

Street lighting 615 96 

Repairs, 110 01 

Water rates, 9 50 

11,648" 71 



Amounts carried forward, $644,703 12 $705,477 39 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



69 



Amounts brought forward $644,703 12 $705,477 39 

Pensions: — 
Chamberlin pension, . . . . 

Elder pension, " . 

Barry pension, 

Armstrong pension, . . . . 

Kenney pension, . 

Lord pension, 

Haddock pension, 

Finn pension (Annie L. Finn), 

Harding pension, . . . ■ . . ... 

Stewart pension, , 

Finn pension (Benjamin Finn), . 

Powers pension, 

Woodworth allowance, 

Cadegan pension, 

Mateer pension, 

McCarthy pension, . . . . . . 

Ellis pension, . . . 

Donohoe pension, 

Philbrick pension, . - . 

White pension, 



$929 


13 


844 


67 


736 


19 


669 


26 


669 


26 


669 


26 


640 


50 


600 


00 


600 


00 


600 


00 


594 


77 


400 


00 


364 


00 


352 


60 


300 


00 


165 


32 


164 


52 


64 


11 


64 


11 


59 


18 



9,486 88 



654,190 00 



Balance, 



$51,287 39 



Special Appropriations. 
Band Concerts. 



Appropriation, 



Expenditures. 



Blue Hills Division: — 

Bands, 

Construction of band stands, 
Extra police 



Middlesex Fells Division: — 
Bands, ; 

Extra police, .... 



Revere Beach Division: 
Bands, .... 
Band stands, . 
Labor, .... 



Charles River Upper Division: — 

Bands, 

Extra police, 



Nahant Beach Parkway: — 

Bands, 

Labor 



Nantasket Beach Reservation: 
Bands, , 

Bunker Hill Monument: — 

Bands, 

Extra police, 



$1,509 00 

86 37 

5 00 



5,084 76 
1 00 



$1,130 00 
369 74 
115 20 



$2,603 50 
5 50 



$1,410 00 
28 80 



$165 00 
50 



$1,600 37 
3,085 76 

4,614 94 

2,609 00 

1,438 80 
6,652 00 

165 50 



$35,000 00 



20,166 37 



Balance, 



$14,833 63 



70 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 



System Maintenance. 

Chapter 629, Acts of 1920. 

Appropriation, $5,000 00 

Expenditure: — 
Dredging Aberjona River: — 

Contract, Coleman Brothers, 4,918 26 

Balance, $81 74 

Metropolitan Parks, Boulevard Maintenance. 

Appropriation Dec. 1, 1919, to Dec. 1, 1920, $433,355 00v 

Expenditures. 
General Expense: — 
Police: — 

Payrolls $68,530 16 

Miscellaneous, 13,787 81 

$82,317 97 

Salaries: — 

Commissioners, $2,500 00 

General office, 10,423 79 

Engineering department, .... 12,196 25 

25,120 04 

Rent, lighting and care of offices, 5,125 54 

Engineering: — 

Automobile expense, $1,124 71 

Office supplies, 719 89 

1,844 60 

Office supplies, 1,009 99 

Stationery and printing, 877 09 

Telephones, 534 67 

Maps and books, 93 48 

$116,923 38 

Blue Hills Parkway: — 

General labor $8,666 31 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor, 533 11 

Road repairs: — 

Labor $1,702 89 

Supplies 3,750 50 

5,453 39 

Street lighting 2,351 23 

General supplies, 482 26 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 103 21 

Water rates, 31 07 

Physicians, etc., 28 00 

Repairs 25 00 

Lighting buildings, 9 51 

17,683 09 

Middlesex Fells Parkway: — 

General labor $21,936 61 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor 963 69 

Road repairs: — 

Labor $5,072 89 

Supplies, 4,295 63 

9,368 52 

Amounts carried forward $32,268 82 $134,606 47 $433,355 00 






1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 71 

Amounts brought forward $32,26882 $134,60647 $433,35500 

Street lighting, 13,423 90 

General supplies, 4,662 17 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 784 59 

Advertising, 209 55 

Telephones, . . . . - 101 45 

Physicians, etc. 82 00 

Repairs, 40 75 

Services of flagman, repairs to bridge, . . . . . 38 88 

Water rates, 16 40 

Lighting buildings, . . . 10 50 

51,639 01 

Mystic Valley Parkway: — 

General labor $18,494 06 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor, 1,802 07 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, . . . ... . . $6,172 05 

Supplies, . . . 6,265 46 

12,437 51 

Street lighting, 4,352 75 

General supplies, . '. . . . . . . . . 2,320 70 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 1,098 57 

Telephones, 83 05 

Water rates, . . . . . . 25 12 

Physicians, etc 15 00 

Stationery and printing 6 65 

40,635 48 

Revere Beach Parkway: — 

General labor, $36,657 69 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor, ........ $487 48 

Supplies, 1 47 

488 95 

Road repairs: — 

Labor . $2,007 72 

Supplies, 5,758 31 

8,366 03 

Street lighting 10,057 18 

General supplies, 7,227 45 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 1,423 34 

Repairs, 739 98 

Power for draw, 367 50 

Water rates 5 00 

Postage 4 00 

65,337 12 

Neponset River Parkway: — 

General labor, $1,171 33 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor, 200 68 

General supplies, 49 62 

Automobile expense, 20 01 

1,441 64 

Nahant Beach Parkway: — 

General labor, $7,401 33 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, . . $171 17 

Supplies 133 51 

304 68 

Amounts carried forward, $7,706 01 $193,659 72 $433,355 00 



72 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Amounts brought forward, $7,706 01 $193,659 72 $433,355 00 

Street lighting, ggO qq 

Keep of horses 520 03 

General supplies, 455 75 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 139 83 

' 9,811 63 

Fresh Pond Parkway: — 

General labor, $1,428 24 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor $3 64 2 7 

Supplies 153 66 

517 93 

Road repairs: — 

Labor m $ 195 35 

Supplies, 509 62 

704 97 

Street lighting, .... 420 00 

Automobile expense, 163 63 

General supplies, 91 48 

Use of snowplow, 15 00 

3,341 25 

Furnace Brook Parkway: — 

'General labor, $7,842 58 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor 344 39 

JRoad repairs: — 

Labor, $892 80 

•Supplies, 1,030 26 

■ 1,923 06 

Street lighting 2,575 34 

General supplies, 1,837 62 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 182 91 

Water rates 14 00 

Repairs, 11 55 

Lighting buildings, 511 

14,736 56 

Winthrop Parkway: — 

General labor, $581 29 

Road repairs: — 

Labor 26 80 

Street lighting 235 85 

General supplies 79 75 

923 69 

Lynn way: — 

General labor $11,208 19 

Road repairs: — 

Labor $49 36 

Supplies, 33 27 

82 63 

General supplies, 1,873 37 

Repairs, 521 46 

Power for lighting and operating draw, 478 99 

Street lighting 210 00 

Keep of horses, 5 00 

Postage 4 00 

14,383 64 

Amounts carried forward $236,856 49 $433,355 00 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 73 

Amounts brought forward, $236,856 49 $433,355 00 

Lynn Fells Parkway: — 

•General labor $3,286 00 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, $220 75 

Supplies, . . . . . . . . 88 40 

309 15 

Street lighting . . . 1,554 06 

General supplies, 490 11 

Automobile expense, 133 85 

5,773 17 

Middlesex Fells Roads: — 

General labor $4,123 03 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, . $7,024 33 

Supplies 8,431 01 

15,455 34 

Street lighting . 2,595 74 

Automobile expense, 184 53 

General supplies, 78 19 

22,436 83 

Alewife Brook Parkway: — 

General labor $10,827 10 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor, 188 12 

Road repairs: — 

Labor $673 84 

Supplies 99 60 

773 44 

General supplies, . 1,714 52 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., . . . . . 905 07 

Street lighting, 896 48 

Physicians' services, etc., 56 75 

15,361 48 

Woburn Parkway: — 

General labor . $3,949 82 

Gypsy and brown-tail moth work: — 

Labor, ."■•.-' 56 81 

Road repairs: — 

Supplies, 45 00 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 838 88 

General supplies, . 308 25 

Street lighting 175 49 

Water rates, 15 86 

5,390 11 

Hammond Pond Parkway: — 
General labor, 1,535 18 

Neponset River Bridge: — 

General labor, $11,134 77 

General supplies, 1,342 74 

Street lighting 150 00 

Telephones 34 26 

Postage 2 00 

12,663 77 

400,017 03 

Balance $33,337 97 



74 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan.. 

Boulevard Maintenance. 
Special Items, Chapter 629, Acts of 1920. 

Appropriation, $95,000 00' 

Expenditures. 
Middlesex Fells Parkway: — 
Construction: — 

Contract, Simpson Brothers, .... $14,937 41 

Labor and materials, 147 85 

$15,085 26 



Engineering: — 

Services $534 08 

Expenses, 27 00 



561 08 

Advertising, 49 95 



$15,696 29 



West Roxbury Parkway: — 
Engineering: — 

Services $583 64 

Expenses, 89 94 



673 58 



16,369 87 



Balance, $78,630 13 



Charles River Basin Maintenance. 
Maintenance of Parks and Water Areas. 

Appropriation, $119,231 44 

Expenditures. 

General labor, $35,408 49 

Teaming, 878 00 

$36,286 49 



Police: — 

Pay rolls, $49,672 70 

Miscellaneous 5,392 33 

55,065 03 

Street lighting, 4,745 49 

General supplies, 3,920 84 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., 2,005 15 

Lighting buildings, 1,207 86 

Water rates, 733 46 

Keep of horses, 308 55 

Telephones, 201 42 

Stationery and printing, 183 90 

Repairs, 43 20 

Physicians' services, 20 00 

Express, 7 83 

Postage, 3 00 

104,732 22 

Balance, $14,499 22 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 75 



Maintenance and Operation of Locks, Gates and Drawbridges. 

Appropriation, $80,500 22 

Expenditures. 

General labor, $43,636 47 

Teaming, 5,460 23 

$49,096 70 

Ice-breaking: — 

Labor, . $15,254 88 

Supplies 5,415 76 

20,670 64 

Coal, . 3,524 27 

General supplies, . . . 2,434 27 

Repairs, 1,581 10 

Electric power, . . ... . . . . . . . . 1,563 74 

Heating, 564 35 

Lighting lock-gate houses and sluices, 515 05 

Automobile expense, 231 27 

Telephones, 108 50 

Keep of horses, . 43 30 

Physicians' services, 5 00 

Water rates, 4 30 

Traveling, 1 50 

Miscellaneous, ' 88 

80,344 87 

Balance $155 35 



Nantasket Beach Maintenance. 

Appropriation, . $70,683 28 

Expenditures. 

General labor $22,403 69 

Road repairs: — 

Labor, $5,602 43 

Supplies 3,292 15 

8,894 58 

Police: — 

Payrolls, $20,126 65 

Miscellaneous, 4,756 10 

24,882 75 

General supplies, 2,483 83 

Street lighting 1,920 18 

Coal 1,404 11 

Horses, carriages, automobiles, etc., . 1,286 64 

Keep of horses, 1,011 82 

Water rates 681 50 

Rent 490 00 

Repairs, 480 00 

Telephones, 199 85 

Freight and express, 125 49 

Stationery and printing, 54 81 

Use of snowplow, Nantasket Hotel, 30 00 

Postage, ' 28 15 

Traveling, 8 52 

66,385 92 

Balance, $4,297 36 



76 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Appropriation, 



Labor, 
Repairs, . 
Street lighting, 
General supplies, 
Telephones, 
Keep of horses, 
Postage, . 



Wellington Bridge Maintenance. 



Expenditures. 



$10,278 13 

2,819 34 

1,917 04 

289 65 

86 45 

5 00 

2 00 



$16,867 00 



15,397 61 



Balance, . $1,469 39 

Bunker Hill Monument Maintenance. 

Appropriation, $12,000 00 

Expenditures. 

General labor, $5,535 53 

Police: — 

Payrolls, $3,653 86 

Miscellaneous, 142 30 

3,796 16 

General supplies, 440 87 

Lighting buildings, 425 89 

Telephones, . 137 85 

Repairs, 79 40 

Water rates, 12 32 

Keep of horses 7 50 

Boiler inspection, 2 00 

Stationery and printing, 1 75 

10,439 27 

Balance $1,560 73 

Bunker Hill — Special Improvement. 

Appropriation, $25,000 00 

Expenditures. 
Improvement: — 
Contracts: — 

Jas. H. Fannon, $13,859 84 

W. L. Waples Company 5,020 00 

$18,879 84 

Supplies 307 83 

$19,187 67 

Engineering: — 

Services $484 53 

Expenses, 35 15 

519 68 

Advertising, 254 55 

Cleaning and painting fence, 110 00 

Landscape architects: — 

Services, $41 51 

Expenses, . 70 

42 21 

20,114 11 

Balance , $4,885 89 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 77 

Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund. 
Receipts, Dec. 1, 1919, to Dec. 1, 1920. 

Bath-houses: — 

Revere Beach, sale of bath tickets, . . . . . $33,287 50 
Interest, ........... 244 60 

$33,532 10 

Nantasket Beach, sale of bath tickets, $20,194 30 

Interest, 42 96 

20,237 26 

Nahant Beach, sale of bath tickets 8,645 40 

Blue Hills, sale of bath tickets, . . . 328 70 

$62,743 46 

Rentals: — 

Buildings, .... . . . . . . . . . . $22,988 02 

Roller-coaster and merry-go-round, 3,500 00 

Lunch stands and refectories, 2,160 00 

Boathouse sites, . . . ... 1,440 00 

Day rentals, Riverside Recreation Grounds, . . . . . . 1,275 00 

Street railway location, 1,246 48 

Land 1,227 09 

Houses, . . . ' 1,081 79 

Ducts, 687 99 

Boats, ' . 620 30 

Automobile stands, . . ... . . . . . . 350 00 

Dance hall, Nantasket, . . . . ... . . . . 175 00 

Gas main location, . ■ . . 100 00 

36,851 67 

Sales: — 

Wood, ....'........... $13,428 27 

Old metal, lumber, paper, etc., 2,892 58 

Hay and grass, . 1,010 55 

Bowling alley, . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600 00 

Tower clock 350 00 

Nursery stock, - 185 70 

Sanitary napkins, 180 12 

Old water carts, . . 160 00 

Posts and stakes, 122 75 

Horse, 100 00 

Gravel, 93 00 

Vegetables, 78 40 

Barrels, . . • . . . 51 05 

Lost articles, 22 99 

Tickets, 9 18 

Plans, 7 42 

Miscellaneous, , 2 94 

19,294 95 

Court fines, 7,015 77 

Steamer chair and umbrella privilege, . . . . 5,350 10' 

Income on money invested, 4,593 20 

Admissions, Bunker Hill Monument, 3,367 30 

Sidewalk and entrance construction, 1,131 26 

Bags, cans, etc., returned, 800 24 

Spraying land in Winchester, 739 07 

Repairs to Holmes Memorial, 210 00 

Removal of garbage, 210 00 

Pay closets, 207 51 

Amount carried forward, $142,514 53 



78 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Amount brought forward, $142,514 53 

Souvenir privilege, Bunker Hill Monument, 187 50 

Light and water furnished, 182 14 

Damage to property, 157 75 

Refund on tickets, 104 65 

Lost equipment, 96 03 

Money found, 51 15 

Rebate on lamp contract, 48 34 

Newspaper licenses, 45 00 

Telephone tolls, . 36 51 

Conveyance of land, 36 00 

Shortage in delivery (coal), 23 47 

Replaced keys and checks, 9 00 

Rebate on telephone, 8 40 

$143,500 47 

Balance Dec. 1, 1919, 152,315 75 



$295,816 22 

Expenditures Dec. 1, 1919, to Dec. 1, 1920. 

General expense: — ■ 
Advertising privileges, $60 65 

Police: — 

Horses $715 00 

Legal services, 250 00 



Engineering: — ■ 

Tickets, $101 13 

Telephone, 9 25 



965 00 



110 38 



Blue Hills Reservation: — 

Surfacing and grading roads, $3,500 00 

Portable sawmill rig 313 00 

Repairs to buildings, 256 08 

Skiff and oars 246 91 

Bath-house tickets, 2 50 

Middlesex Fells Reservation: — 

Repairs to buildings, $926 10 

Flags, 43 20 

Construction of drain, $7 05 

Refund 14 62 

21 67 



4,318 49 



990 97 



Revere Beach Reservation: — 
Bath-house: — 

Payrolls $25,191 10 

Bathing suits, 5,115 02 

Coal, 3,216 15 

Towels 1,117 90 

Lighting 752 25 

Repairs 601 87 

Stationery, 371 93 

Stockings 338 10 

Tickets, etc., 267 38 

Lumber, etc 262 03 

Engine room, 259 15 

Soap, etc 247 55 

Water rates 230 40 

Bathing caps 179 58 

Time stamps, 165 00 



Amounts carried forward, $38,315 41 $6,445 49 



1921. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



79 



Amounts brought forward, . . . . ' $38,315 41 $38,315 41 

Hardware, 151 38 

Neckbands, 149 10 

Ice, . . 128 19 

Uniforms, ...'.. 65 00 

Sanitary napkins, 64 45 

Paint, . . . . 63 36 

Drilling, 60 14 

Medicines and attendance, 50 48 

Telephones, . . . - 48 65 

Findings 46 18 

Electric fan 31 36 

Watchman's clock parts, ........ 30 91 

Wrapping paper, 27 86 

Claim for damages, 25 00 

Stencils 19 56 

Rental of typewriter, 18 00 

Electric bell . . ...;'. . 12 25 

Photos, . . . . 12 00 

Express, 11 67 

Kerosene, ■. 9 40 

Advertising, 7 95 

Rubber banding for mat, ....... 7 67 

Oars, 6 17 

Electric heater, 5 75 

Fuses, 5 11 

Brass checks, 4 97 

Water carboys, 4 50 

Combs, 4 12 

Bicarbonate of soda, ........ 3 27 

Miscellaneous, , . 8 35 

$39,398 21 

Storm damage, . - . ... . 788 16 

Ford touring car 394 00 

Entrance construction, . $128 52 

Refund, . . ... . . . . . . . 5 15 

133 67 

Advertising, 45 15 

Rewiring shelters, 35 56 

40,794 75 

Stony Brook Reservation: — 

Water rates $23 68 

Repairs 7 75 

31 43 

Charles River Upper Division: — 

Pump house, $904 79 

Water rates, 44 20 

Repairs, 25 92 

Advertising, 25 56 

Towels, 23 28 

Flags 21 60 

1,045 35 

Lynn Shore Reservation: — 

Repairs to sea wall, 956 45 

Quincy Shore Reservation: — 

Building addition to substation, $934 57 

Refund of deposit for entrance construction, 220 00 

Refund of amount paid for chair privilege, 50 00 

Advertising, 17 25 

1,221 82 

Amount carried forward, $50,495 29 



80 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Amount brought forward, $50,495 29* 

"Winthrop Shore Reservation: — 
Repairs to sea wall, 9,416 53 

Charles River Lower Basin: — 

Naval architects' services, $1,687 50 

Repairs to Holmes Memorial, 210 00 

1,897 50- 

Blue Hills Parkway: — 

Repairs to roadway $1,072 67 

Refund of deposit for entrance construction, 103 34 



Middlesex Fells Parkway: — 

Entrance construction, $287 03 

Refund of deposits, 43 22 

Telephones 

Mystic Valley Parkway: — 

Rebuilding floor of bridge over Aberjona River, 

Legal services, 

Entrance construction, 

Revere Beach Parkway : — 

Refund, entrance construction 

Entrance construction, 



$330 
6 


25 
20 


$798 27 
25 00 
15 50 


$444 
150 


13 
32 



1,176 01 



336 45> 



838 77 



594 45 



Nahant Beach Parkway: — 
Bath-house: — 

Payrolls, $6,180 16 

Bathing suits 2,196 00 

Lumber, etc., 431 36 

Coal 347 50 

Stockings, 225 40 

Lighting 142 17 

Telephones, 81 04 

Tickets, etc., 74 44 

Time stamps, 55 00 

Baskets, ' 51 80 

Paint, 34 61 

Ice 23 80 

Repairs, 22 36 

Engine room, 22 22 

Repairs to clock, 20 87 

Hardware, .... * 20 34 

Uniform, 20 00 

Oil for lanterns, 17 02 

Combs and brushes 16 00 

Stationery, 14 96 

Bond renewals, 12 00 

Medicines and attendance, 10 71 

Flags 10 12 

Fuses, 5 13 

Advertising, . 2 20 

■ 10,037 21 

Amount carried forward, $71,792 21 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 81 

Amount brought forward, $74,792 21 

Winthrop Parkway: — 
Repairing sea wall: — 

Contract, Coleman Brothers $11,763 80 

Engineering services, 83 25 



Lynn Fells Parkway: — 

Entrance construction, $90 78 

Refund of deposit, 28 82 



Alewife Brook Parkway: — 

Land, $3,131 26 

Legal services, . . ." . . 100 00 



11,847 05 



119 60 



3,231 26 



Old Colony Parkway: — 
Telephones, 45 



Woburn Parkway: — 

Entrance construction^ $69 75 

Refund of deposit, 4 75 

74 50 

Bunker Hill Monument: — 

Brass rail, $135 83 

Advertising, 2 25 



138 08 



Nantasket Beach Reservation: — 
Bath-house: — 

Payrolls, . $12,178 27 

Bathing suits 4,252 00 

Coal 2,265 88 

Towels, 1,274 07 

Water rates 514 52 

Stationery and printing, 313 61 

Repairs, _ 275 41 

Stockings, 173 99 

Ice, 168 72 

Engine room, . 151 78 

Uniforms, 134 74 

Safe 110 00 

Time stamps, 110 00 

Hardware, 108 92 

Bathing caps, 107 31 

Repairs to clock 102 75 

Soap, etc., 93 25 

Tickets 86 35 

Proportioning steam charges, 85 00 

Emergency room, 68 39 

Drilling 56 26 

Neck bands, 49 90 

Telephones, 41 65 

Lumber, etc., 37 73 

Electric fan, 32 93 

Baskets, 32 01 

Lighting, 29 45 

Paint 27 52 



Amounts carried forward, . ' $22,882 41 $90,203 15 



82 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Amounts brought forward, $22,882 41 $90,203 15 

Bath-house — ■ Con. 

Brooms and brushes, 25 84 

Expenses of employees, 24 15 

Traveling 20 00 

Steel letters and numbers, 14 11 

Findings, 6 53 

Bond renewal, 6 00 

Rubber bands, 3 63 

Brass checks, 3 60 

Advertising, 3 15 

Miscellaneous, 1 56 

$22,990 98 

Repairs to buildings, 17,023 48 

Legal services, 50 00 

Advertising 43 60 

Extending sewer, 35 28 

40,143 34 



$130,346 49 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



83 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



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1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 48. 



87 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF 
ENGINEER OF WATER DIVISION. 



James A. Bailey, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Sir: — I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
construction and maintenance operations of the Water Division for 
the calendar vear 1920. 



ORGANIZATION, 

The principal assistants employed in directing and supervising the 
work of the Division at the close of last year have continued in serv- 
ice for another vear and are as follows: — 



John L. Howard, 
Elliot R. B. AUardice, 
Frank S. Hart, 
Samuel E. Killam, . 
Arthur E. O'Xeil, . 
Alfred 0. Doane, 

William* TV. Locke, . 
Clifford Foss, . 

Benjamin F. Hancox, 
James TV. Killam, . 

William E. Whittaker, 
Charles E. Livermore, 



Deputy Chief Engineer. 

Superintendent of Wachusett Section. 

Superintendent of Sudbury Section. 

Superintendent of Distribution Section. 

Superintendent of Pumping Stations. 

Engineer in charge of Mechanical Engineering 
and Inspection. 

Sanitary Inspector of Watersheds. 

Engineer in charge of Distribution Civil Engi- 
neering. 

Head Draftsman. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of Coal and Oil 
Laboratory. 

Chief Clerk in charge of General Office. 

Biologist in charge of Biological Laboratory. 



Including these principal assistants the number of supervising, 
engineering and clerical employees was 44 at the beginning of the 
year and 45 at the end of the year. 

In addition to these forces the labor forces engaged in maintaining 
and operating the reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, hydro-electric 
stations and pumping stations and doing miscellaneous construction 
work has been as follows : — 



88 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 





Number of Employees. 


Section. 


Beginning 
of Year. 


End of 
Year. 


Maximum. 


Average. 


Wachusett section, 

Sudbury section, 

Distribution section, ...... 

Pumping stations, 


50 
68 
93 
74 


48 

74 

102 

74 


75 

75 

103 

75 


58 
71 
95 
71 


Total labor forces, 


285 


298 


328 


295 



CONSTRUCTION. 
Meters and Connections. 

Under the provisions of chapter 172 of the General Acts of 1916 
some minor work has been done in Washington Street, Brookline, 
On the low-service pipe lines acquired from the city of Boston in 
1913. At the close of the year 1919 the work at this place had been 
completed, with the exception of installing the meter registers and 
repairing the street. On account of delay in receiving the registers 
the meters were not put into service until November 10, 1920, and 
on account of unfavorable conditions at that time the work of 
permanently repairing the street pavement was deferred, with the 
expectation that it would be done early in 1921. 



Northern Extra High-service 16-inch Pipe Line for 

Lexington. 

At the close of the year 1919 the northern extra high-service 16- 
inch pipe line for Lexington had been completed, with the exception 
of laying 204 feet of pipe line near the Arlington standpipe, and 
connecting the ends of the new pipe line with the distribution sys- 
tem. This work was completed by the permanent pipe line force 
of the Division, and the new line was put into service May 27, 1920. 

June 11, 1920, a contract was made with John A. Gaffey of Med- 
ford for rebuilding the tar via macadam roadway on the southerly 
side of Massachusetts Avenue for a distance of about 1,000 feet 
easterly from the Lexington boundary line, where it had been dis- 
turbed by blasting in constructing the pipe line. This work was 
completed on July 27 at a cost of $3,031.80. 

The total expenditures for the pipe line amount to $43,871. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 89 



Southern Extra High-service 12-inch Pipe Line for Hyde 

Park and Milton. 

The construction of the southern extra high-service 12-inch pipe 
lines in Poplar Street, West Roxbury, and across the Neponset 
River at West Street for Hyde Park and Milton was authorized by 
chapter 172 of the General Acts of 1916, and chapter 165 of the 
General Acts of 1919. The flexible jointed pipes purchased in 1918 
for the duplicate line across the river were not laid in 1920 because 
of unfavorable conditions. It is planned to lay these pipes during 
the coming summer. 

The 12-inch pipe line in Poplar Street, which was nearly com- 
pleted in 1919, was connected to the existing distribution lines by 
the permanent pipe line force of the Division, and was put into 
service December 31, 1920. 

New Work authorized during 1920. 

Chapter 530 of the Acts of 1920 provides for an expenditure of 
$250,000 for the installation of additional pumping equipment for 
the northern high service; of $200,000 for the installation of ad- 
ditional pumping equipment for the southern high service; of 
$175,00£) for replacing the Arlington standpipe by an enclosed 
reservoir of larger capacity; of $280,000 for reinforcing the northern 
high-service pipe lines; and of $1,800,000 for a supply main from 
the Weston Aqueduct to the northern low-service district. 

For the northern high-service pumping station at Spot Pond plans 
have been made for installing a steam turbine driven centrifugal 
pump having a capacity of about 22,000,000 gallons a day for 
pumping to the Fells Reservoir, with a connected auxiliary cen- 
trifugal pump for repumping about 4,000,000 gallons a day from the 
discharge of the main pump to the Bear Hill Reservoir. The in- 
stallation of two additional vertical fire tube boilers is also contem- 
plated as the existing boilers have been in service over twenty-one 
years. 

The proposed pumping unit can be installed for 25 per cent of 
the cost of a high-duty, triple expansion pumping engine, and as 
it will be held in reserve for emergencies and will not be used regu- 
larly low cost of installation is of more importance than high duty. 

For the southern high-service pumping station at Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir plans have been made for replacing an old battery of 



90 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

three horizontal return tubular boilers 64 inches in diameter with 
two vertical fire tube boilers 98 inches in diameter, and for replacing 
the old compound duplex Gaskill pumping engine, known as No. 2, 
which has a capacity of 8,000,000 gallons a day, with a horizontal 
cross compound crank and flywheel pumping engine of a capacity 
of 15,000,000 gallons a day. 

May 27 a contract was made with the D. M. Dillon Steam Boiler 
Works of Fitchburg for furnishing the new boilers for the sum of 
$19,790. August 25 a contract was made with the Ames Iron 
Works of Oswego, New York, for furnishing a 35-kilowatt electric 
lighting unit for the sum of $3,649. October 29 a contract was made 
with the Worthington Pump and Machinery Corporation of New 
York for furnishing the new pumping engine for the sum of $75,900. 
Satisfactory progress has been made under all of these contracts. 

Surveys and plans have been made for the Arlington Reservoir 
and for the proposed northern high-service pipe lines, but construc- 
tion work has not yet been begun on these projects. 

MAINTENANCE. 
Rainfall and Yield of Watersheds. 

The precipitation on the watersheds was unusually large during 
1920. The total for the Wachusett watershed was 55.66 inches, 
and 10.34 inches above the average for the past twenty-four years; 
the total for the Sudbury watershed was 48.66 inches, and 4.04 
inches above the average for the past forty-six years; and the total 
for the Cochituate watershed was 50.75 inches, and 5.51 inches 
above the average for the past fifty-eight years. The monthly 
precipitation was less than the average during January, August and 
October on all of the watersheds; also during July on the Sudbury 
and Cochituate watersheds, and during May on the Cochituate 
watershed. 

The percentage of rainfall collected was 61.7 on the Wachusett 
watershed, 53.6 on the Sudbury watershed, and 58.2 on the Co- 
chituate watershed. 

The annual yield of all of the watersheds was above the average 
during 1920. The amount in gallons per day per square mile was 
1,629,000 on the Wachusett watershed, 1,239,000 on the Sudbury 
watershed, and 1,403,000 on the Cochituate watershed. The monthly 
yield was below the average on all of the watersheds in January, 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



91 



February, August and October, and was also below the average 
on the Sudbury watershed in November, and on the Cochituate 
watershed in September. 

Between June 15 and December 15 the city of Worcester dis- 
charged 126,500,000 gallons of water into the Wachusett Reservoir 
watershed from the 9.35 square miles formerly tributary to the 
reservoir, and which the city diverted for its water supply in 1911. 
In accordance with the agreement of November 2, 1914, the Com- 
monwealth will pay the city of Worcester for this water at the rate 
of $2 per million gallons. The city also discharged 2,051,100,000 
gallons of water from the diverted area into the Wachusett Reser- 
voir watershed at other times during the year for which no com- 
pensation will be paid, as the reservoir filled before June 15. 

Storage Reservoirs. 

The capacities of the storage reservoirs of the Metropolitan Water 
Works, the elevation of the water surfaces, and the quantity of 
water stored in each reservoir at the beginning and at the end of 
the year are shown by the following table : — 





Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
High 

Water. 


Capacity 
(Gallons). 


Jan. 1, 1920. 


Jaj 


I. 1, 1921. 


Storage Reservoirs. 


Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 

Water 

Surface. 


Amount 

stored 
(Gallons). 


Eleva- 
tion 1 
of 

Water 
Surface. 


Amount 

stored 
(Gallons). 


Cochituate watershed: — 














Lake Cochituate, 2 . 


144.36 


2,097,100,000 


143.96 


2,002,100,000 


142.48 


1,655,600,000 


Sudbury watershed: — 














Sudbury Reservoir, 


260.00 


7,253,500,000 


258.01 


6,425,900,000 


257.733 


6,317,000,000 


Framing ham Reservoir 

No. 1. 
Framingham Reservoir 

No. 2. 
Framingham Reservoir 

No. 3. 
Ashland Reservoir, 


169.32 
177.87 


289,900,000 « 
529,900,000* 


167.85 
176.08 


222,600,000 
485,200,000 


167.83 
176.09 


221,700,000 
485,600,000 


186.74 


1,180,000,000* 


186.84 


1,207,900,000 


186.04 


1,142,700,000 


225.21 


1,416,400,000 


224.42 


1,372,900,000 


224.44 


1,374,000,000 


Hopkinton Reservoir, 


305.00 


1,520,900,000 


304.06 


1,462,100,000 


304.13 


1,466,500,000 


Whitehall Reservoir, 


337.91 


1,256,900,000 


336.65 


1,013,300,000 


336.43 


971,400,000 


Farm Pond, 


159.25 


167,500,000 


158.40 


122,200,000 


159.03 


155,700,000 


Wachusett watershed: — 














Wachusett Reservoir, 


395.00 


64,968,000,000 


392.03 


61,013,500,000 


393.75 


63,292,000,000 


Totals 


- 


80,680,100,000 


- 


75,327,700,000 


- 


77,082,200,000j 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

2 Excluding Dudley Pond which was abandoned April 3, 1916. 



3 Below Circular Dam . 

4 To top of flashboards. 



92 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

The diagram on page 59 shows the quantity of water stored in 
the Wachusett Reservoir, and the quantity stored in all the storage 
reservoirs combined during the year. 

The table and diagram show the total storage which could be 
drained from the reservoirs. Special provisions would be necessary, 
however, to draw about 10,000,000,000 gallons of this storage for 
consumption, as it is below the outlet channels which can be con- 
veniently used for regular service. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



93 



QUANTITY OF WATER STORED IN TKE WACHUSETT RESERVOIR 
AND IN ALL THE STORAGE RESERVOIRS COMBINED 
DURING 1920 

JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP OCT. NOV. DEC. 



82,000 



&0.000 



78,000 



76.000 



74,000 



72.000 



70,000 



68.000 



66.000 

C 

£ $4,000 

ro 
O 

c 62.000 
o 



s 60.000 



58.000 



56.000 



54.000 



52.000 



50.000 



48.000 



1 -1 1 1 . 

COMBINED CAPACITY OF ALL 


; i i i i 

^RDRA6E RESERVOIRS AT HI6H. WAT 


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82.00C 



80.000 



78.000 



76.000 



74.000 



72.000 



70,000 



68,000 



66.000 

c 
64.000 £ 

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62.000 



60.000 



58.000 



56.000 



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50.000 



48.000 



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JAN FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN JUL. AUG. SEP. OCX NOV. DEC 



94 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 



Wachusett Reservoir. 

At the beginning of the year the water in the Wachusett Reser- 
voir was 2.97 feet below elevation 395, the designed high-water line, 
and the quantity in storage was 61,013,500,000 gallons. On ac- 
count of the high stage of the water, the wasting of water from the 
reservoir, which was begun in December, 1919, in order to reserve 
storage capacity for controlling the spring freshet flows and to con- 
serve water power, was continued to the extent warranted by the 
conditions. On March 5, 1920, the water had been drawn down to 
elevation 387.53, the lowest stage reached during the year. The 
quantity in storage was then 55,209,600,000 gallons. Following a 
period of thaws and rains the water rose rapidly and filled the 
reservoir to elevation 395 on March 27. The water remained sub- 
stantially at or above this elevation until July 26. The highest stage 
reached was elevation 396.01 on June 18. The amount of water in 
storage was then 66,334,800,000 gallons. On March 28 water was 
wasted from the reservoir at a maximum rate of 980,000,000 gallons 
per day, — 538,000,000 gallons over the wasteway and 442,000,000 
gallons through the waste pipes. On account of the high stage of 
the water in the reservoir, wasting of water was resumed October 22 
to conserve power and reserve storage capacity for controlling the 
spring freshet flows in 1921, and the water was drawn down to ele- 
vation 388.4 on November 16, but on account of the heavy rains 
which followed, the water rose continuously, and at the close of the 
year had reached elevation 393.75, a higher stage than at the close 
of any previous year. The reservoir then contained 63,292,000,000 
gallons of water. 

During the year 22,317,600,000 gallons of water, or about 34 
per cent of the capacity of the reservoir, were wasted into the 
Nashua River in addition to 616,700,000 gallons discharged from 
the reservoir, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 488 of 
the Acts of 1895, and 7,757,700,000 gallons of this water were 
utilized for the generation of electric energy. 

The usual work of removing material which had drifted into the 
reservoir with the water and was deposited along the shore, and of 
cutting and burning brush and weeds growing along the margins of 
the reservoir, the sides of adjacent highways, and along brooks and 
rivers which flow directly into the reservoir, has been done at a cost 
of $7,184.01. This work extended over a distance of about 65 miles. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 95 

Wire fences were erected along property lines and highways for 
a distance of 6,762 linear feet at a cost of 29.7 cents per linear 
foot, exclusive of posts which were obtained from the water works 
lands. 

The crest of the circular concrete dam at the head of the Quin- 
apoxet basin was temporarily repaired by filling the cracks and 
joints with Portland cement grout and patching the badly worn 
portions of the exposed surface with Portland cement mortar at a 
cost of $122.18. 

The engine in the motor patrol boat, which had been in service 
for twelve years, was rebuilt, and the patrol boat and motor work 
scow have been operated and kept in good serviceable condition 
at a cost of $463.46. 

A 1-ton G. M. C. motor truck was purchased for $2,142.75 for 
transporting men, tools and supplies. 

Standing and rowen grass were sold at auction from about 365 
acres of water works lands bordering on the reservoir and its tribu- 
tary streams for an aggregate amount of $3,464.50. 

Three horses and wagons, sleds and equipment formerly rented 
from the foremen were purchased on December 1, and are now 
maintained by the Commonwealth. 

The Wachusett Dam and adjacent structures and grounds have 
been given the usual care, and, with the exception of the granolithic 
walk on the dam and the roof of the gate chamber and of the power 
house, are in good repair. 

Bids were received August 30 for extensive repairs to the roof of 
the power house, but because of the high prices only temporary 
repairs were undertaken, and the permanent repairs were postponed 
until a more favorable time. 

The original hard pine plank floor of the bridge at the wasteweir, 
built in 1905, was relaid with prime quality, long leaf, Georgia pine 
planking 3 J inches in thickness, at a cost of $1,011.66 for the lum- 
ber and $499.78 for labor and hardware. The bridge is 452 feet 
long by 5 feet wide, and the work included removal and relaying of 
a narrow-gage track on which the flashboards are transported in a 
small car, and the construction of trap doors opening on hinges 
through which the flashboards are put on the wasteway or removed, 
as required. 

The guard rail fence on the westerly side of the roadway to the 
power house, built of stone posts and hard pine rails 4 inches by 



96 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

4 inches, was lined up and repaired for the entire length of 1,180 
linear feet at a cost of $328.66. 

Considerable extra expense was involved in the care of the grounds 
and structures during January, February and March because of the 
unusual depth of snow. 

Nine houses on the reservoir lands, and the barns and other 
buildings located at these premises and at the Clinton and Oakdale 
storage yards, which are owned by the Commonwealth, have been 
kept in good condition. At the Kramer house in Clinton storm 
vestibules and doors were built. At the Kendall place in Boylston 
an electric pump and storage tank were installed, a bathroom was 
provided, a hardwood floor was laid in the kitchen, and alterations 
were made in the heating system at a cost of $1,268.11. At the 
Cook place in West Boylston two rooms were renovated, an electric 
pump and storage tank were installed, and the bathroom was fitted 
with modern fixtures at a cost of $898.89. 

Sudbury Reservoir. 

At the beginning of the year the water in the Sudbury Reservoir 
was at elevation 258.01, or about 1 foot below the crest of the 
overflow at the dam. By March 11 it had been drawn down to 
elevation 254.25 to provide storage for use in regulating the freshet 
flows which were expected with the melting of the large amount of 
snow on the watershed. During the latter part of March the water 
was allowed to rise, and the flashboards were placed on the over- 
flow April 16. During the summer and fall the water in the reser- 
voir was maintained between the crest of the overflow and a few 
inches below the top of the flashboards. In November the water 
was lowered, and the flashboards were removed on the 15th. The 
water was then maintained just below the crest of the overflow, and 
was at elevation 257.73 at the end of the year. No water was 
wasted during the year, and all water discharged from the reservoir 
into the Weston Acjueduct and Framingham Reservoir No. 3 was 
used in generating electric energy. A channel was kept open in the 
ice back of the overflow during the winter, as usual, to prevent ice 
pressure on the masonry. 

The usual care has been taken to keep the grounds and structures 
at the reservoir in good condition. About 15 tons of hay were 
cut, of which 6 tons were furnished for use at Lake Cochituate and 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 97 

the Weston Aqueduct, and the remainder stored in the barn at the 
reservoir. 

A new boat was purchased for use on the reservoir. 

On account of incurable sickness horse No. 40, which had been 
used at the reservoir for over ten years, was killed and replaced 
by a new horse, No. 44. A new one-horse tip cart was also pur- 
chased. 

A new pump was installed at the Cratty house in Fayville. Bath- 
rooms were provided for the two tenements in the house at the 
Sudbury Dam, a closet was also constructed for the upper tenement 
and a storm porch for the lower tenement, and a storage closet for 
electrical supplies was constructed in the barn. 

Sprouts and brush have been cut and burned in the lanes along 
the property lines, along highways and the driveways over Pine 
Hill, along the shores of the reservoir, and on the road from the dam 
to the nursery. 

The wire fence, 1,100 feet in length, along the boundary lines at 
the Robert A. Clarke land at the north side of the reservoir, was 
rebuilt. A new wire fence, 216 feet in length, was built on the 
boundary line at the Anna Morse land on Marlborough Brook, 
north of Walker Street. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3. 

All of the water supplied through the Sudbury Aqueduct to the 
Metropolitan Water District and town of Framingham was drawn 
from Framingham Reservoir No. 3, which was replenished with 
water from the Sudbury Reservoir as required. The draft for 
water supply from the reservoir was continuous excepting for fifteen 
hours on October 19 and for eighteen hours on October 26, and 
27,587,000,000 gallons of water were drawn from the reservoir for 
a part of the water supply of the town of Framingham and of the 
Metropolitan Water District during the year. 

Flashboards were kept on the overflow at the dam all of the year. 
The water was maintained between elevation 183.07 and 187.68. 
About 8,775,700,000 gallons of water were wasted from the reservoir 
during the year. 

The gatehouse, embankments, shrubs and grounds at the dam 
were given the usual care. Sprouts and brush were cut along the 
shores of the reservoir and in the lanes along the property lines. 



98 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and 

Whitehall Reservoirs. 

No water was drawn from Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 
2, Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall reservoirs, for supplying the 
Metropolitan Water District during the year, but all of the reser- 
voirs have been kept substantially full of water except when drawn 
down in the spring in anticipation of large yields, so that the freshet 
flows could be regulated and properly controlled. 

The usual waste of 1,500,000 gallons per day from Framingham 
Reservoir No. 1 into the Sudbury River has been maintained, as 
required by chapter 177 of the Acts of 1872. 

The usual attention has been given to the dams, gate houses and 
other structures and to the grounds at these reservoirs. Brush and 
sprouts have been cut and burned in the lanes along the boundary 
lines of the water works lands. 

At Framingham Reservoir No. 1 the Bullard house was wired for 
electric service and painted inside and outside. The house, attached 
barn, tool house and sheds were shingled, and the tool house and 
flashboards for the dam were painted. 

At Framingham Reservoir No. 2 the flashboards and ironwork 
at the dam were painted, and some resurfacing was done on the 
portion of Fountain Street which crosses the reservoir and is under 
the care of the Water Division. 

At Ashland Reservoir the flashboards and the ironwork at the 
dam and the bridge over the overflow have been painted, and a new 
cesspool for sink drainage has been constructed at the attendant's 
house. 

At Hopkinton Reservoir the flashboards at the outlet dam, and 
the gates and their housings, have been painted. 

At Whitehall Reservoir the overflow at the middle dam at Wood 
Street and the bank walls along the brook below Wood Street were 
repaired and the brook channel was straightened. The town of 
Hopkinton pumped about 2,100,000 gallons of water from Whitehall 
Reservoir at various times to supplement its regular supply. 

Farm Pond. 

No water was diverted into Farm Pond or wasted from the pond 
during the year. The elevation of the water in the pond has been 
higher than at any time since 1908. Under rights reserved by legis- 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 99 

lation the town of Framingham pumped 220,300,000 gallons of water 
from its filter galleries on the northeasterly shore of the pond, and 
the Boston & Albany Railroad took approximately 85,700,000 
gallons and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad ap- 
proximately 53,700,000 gallons of water from the pond for the use 
of locomotives during the year. 

The wooden cover at the gate chamber of the new south dam 
across the outlet was repaired and painted and the platform at 
the sluiceway at the outlet from the pond was repaired. 

Lake Cochituate. 

On account of the limited capacity of the Sudbury Aqueduct and 
the Weston Aqueduct supply mains, Lake Cochituate and the Cochit- 
uate Aqueduct were as usual kept in good condition for use in case 
of an emergency which would prevent the use of the Sudbury or the 
Weston Aqueduct. Such an emergency occurred unexpectedly about 
the middle of October, when it was discovered that the screens and 
supporting framework in the gatehouse of the Sudbury Aqueduct 
at Farm Pond had become unsafe and should be removed without 
further delay. In order to remove the structures it was necessary 
to shut off the flow in the Sudbury Aqueduct, and in connection 
with this operation 287,900,000 gallons of water were drawn from 
Lake Cochituate between October 15 and November 13 for water 
supply. 

Water was wasted at the outlet dam through the gate and at the 
overflow on all the days in January, February and March, all but 
four days in April, all of May and June, all but three days in July, 
on one day in September, five days in October, five days in No- 
vember and all of December. The total waste amounted to 8,321,- 
100,000 gallons. 

High-water line at the lake is elevation 144.36. The water in 
the lake was at elevation 143.96 at the beginning of the year and 
at elevation 142.48 at the end of the year. 

With the expectation that a large and sudden yield might result 
from the melting of the large depth of snow on the watershed the 
stop planks on the outlet dam were entirely removed for the first 
time since the dam was built, to make sure of ample capacity to 
waste the large yield expected, and the water was drawn down to 
2.31 feet below the crest of the overflow, leaving the water 5.20 
feet above the sill of the small outlet gate, which is only 3.8 feet 



100 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

wide. Fortunately the snow on the watershed melted gradually, 
and it was not necessary to waste water from the lake at an exces- 
sive rate at any time. 

Brush and sprouts were cut and burned from the 5-foot lanes on 
the property lines and along the shores of the lake and of Snake 
Brook. Sediment was removed from the catch basins on the cov- 
ered portion of the surface water drain from Cochituate village; 
brush and weeds were mowed for a width of 10 feet on both sides 
of the open channel portion, and the sediment was removed from 
the channel and the settling basin at the junction of Bannister's 
Brook. 

The foreman's house was painted one coat and the roof of the 
house and piazza were shingled. The shed, shop and barn were 
painted and shingled. The iron and wood work at the outlet dam 
was painted, and stop planks were provided for the overflow. The 
iron and wood work and the tin roof at the gatehouse were also 
painted. 

A l|-ton Stewart truck was purchased for carrying supplies. 

Aqueducts. 
Wachusett Aqueduct. 

Water was discharged through the Wachusett Aqueduct from the 
Wachusett Reservoir on 302 days. The total time that the aque- 
duct was in use is equivalent to 189 days, 22 hours and 27 minutes. 
The total quantity of water discharged is 41,476,800,000 gallons, 
equivalent to an average of 113,325,000 gallons per day for the en- 
tire year. Of this total 38,572,100,000 gallons were used to gen- 
erate electric energy at the power station before being discharged 
into the aqueduct. 

The Westborough State Hospital pumped 72,983,000 gallons of 
water from the aqueduct at the terminal chamber during the year. 
This is equivalent to a consumption of 199,400 gallons per day, 
which is the largest since pumping began, nine years ago, and the 
increase is probably due in large measure to the additional pressure 
maintained on the distribution system since the new and higher 
water tank was constructed in 1919. 

The masonry aqueduct, open channel and appurtenances are in 
good condition, with the exception of the Assabet bridge, which re- 
quires waterproofing to stop the leakage which has developed during 
recent years, and a new granolithic walk on the top of the bridge. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 101 

Wire fences have been erected on property lines for a length of 
6,027 feet between Main and Maple streets in Northborough. Short 
portions of this fence replaced the original board rail fence erected 
in 1897. The remainder was built along property lines not pre- 
viously fenced and was necessary at this time because the owners 
now use the adjacent lands for pastures. 

The iron rail and picket fences at the upper and lower dams and 
at the six highways crossing the open channel in Marlborough and 
Southborough, the iron and wood work at the terminal chamber, 
and the pipe rail fences on the Assabet bridge and along the highway 
at Bartlett Pond, Northborough, have been painted. 

Brush, grass and weeds were mowed and disposed of for a dis- 
tance of 10 miles along the aqueduct at a cost of about $350 per 
mile. This is almost double the cost of this work last year and is 
due to mowing large areas along the open channel, which have not 
been mowed for several years, and to an increase of about 20 per 
cent in wages. Considerable extra expense was incurred during the 
unusually severe weather in January, February and March in keep- 
ing the culverts and ditches free from snow and ice. 

Sudbury Aqueduct. 

During the year 27,587,000,000 gallons of water were discharged 
from Framingham Reservoir No. 3 into the Sudbury Aqueduct, of 
which 186,500,000 gallons were pumped from the aqueduct by the 
town of Framingham for a portion of its supply. The remainder of 
the water, equivalent to an average flow of 74,865,000 gallons per 
day, was discharged into the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, from which it 
was pumped to supply a portion of the Metropolitan Water District. 

In October the flow in the aqueduct was shut off to examine the 
screens and the frames supporting them, which had been in service 
since 1898, in the aqueduct gatehouse at Farm Pond, and as the 
examination showed that it was unsafe to use the screens and the 
framework they were removed on the 19th and 26th of October. 

The flow in the aqueduct has been measured monthly with a rated 
current meter to determine the condition of the interior surface of 
the aqueduct so that the daily flow could be calculated from the 
elevation of the water, shown by the recording gage in the aqueduct 
gatehouse at Farm Pond. The measured flows have varied from 
86.68 to 95.56 per cent of the corresponding flow in the aqueduct 
when clean. 



102 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

The plumbing and the plank walk at the office building on the 
aqueduct land at Hollis Street, Framingham, were repaired. Some 
painting was done at the storehouse near Rosemary siphon in Welles- 
ley, at the Waban and Echo bridges and at the wasteweirs and 
siphon chambers. The plank walk at Echo bridge was renewed. 

A rail fence 180 feet in length was built at Leach's Lane, South 
Natick, and the manhole covers were painted where necessary. 

On account of the severe weather an unusual amount of work was 
required to keep the culverts free from snow and ice. 

Brush, grass and weeds on the aqueduct lands were mowed and 
disposed of in the usual manner. 

Weston Aqueduct. 

Water was delivered to the Weston Reservoir from the Sudbury 
Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct on 304 days, or every day 
except Sundays and holidays, and on July 16, when it was necessary 
to interrupt the flow on account of a break in one of the supply 
mains in Brookline. The water supplied to the aqueduct on the 
days when in use is delivered in a period of 15| hours unless the 
conditions require its delivery throughout the entire 24 hours, as 
was the case on 101 days. The total time that the aqueduct was in 
service during the year is equivalent to 210 days, 22 hours and 30 
minutes, and the total quantity of water delivered to the aqueduct 
was 16,091,700,000 gallons, of which 1,600,000 gallons were wasted 
at the Sudbury River and Happy Hollow blow-offs on Sunday, 
November 21, in connection with the inspection of the interior of 
the steel pipe lines across these valleys. This pipe line is 1\ feet 
in diameter, constructed of steel plates %6 of an inch in thickness. 
The interior inspection showed that there were pittings ^^oo of 
an inch in depth, which is 34.28 per cent of the total thickness. The 
pipes have been in service seventeen years, and the pittings have 
increased in depth vio of an inch in the twelve years since the 
previous inspection was made in 1908. 

The total quantity of water delivered to the Weston Reservoir 
from the aqueduct is equivalent to an average flow of 43,962,000 
gallons per day. 

The brush, sprouts, weeds and grass along the aqueduct and 
property lines have been mowed and disposed of as usual. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 103 

Over 10,600 feet of fencing have been repaired and put into good 
condition, using about 600 new posts and 7,300 feet of wire fencing. 

The iron manhole covers and the iron and wood work at the 
gaging chambers, at the siphon chambers and the head house have 
been painted. Culverts along the aqueduct were kept free from ice 

and snow and sediment collecting in them was removed. 

i 

Cochituate Aqueduct. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in use on 17 days in October and 
12 days in November and during this time 287,900,000 gallons of 
water were delivered from Lake Cochituate to Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir. 

The manhole covers and the ironwork at the wasteweirs were 
painted. Eighty feet of rail fence was built at Forest Street, 
Wellesley. The fences on both sides of the right of way across the 
aqueduct at W. W. McLeod's premises in Wellesley Hills were re- 
built, also the party fence on the southeast side of the aqueduct, one- 
half of the expense for this fence being paid by Mr. McLeod. 

Brush, grass and weeds along the aqueduct were mowed and dis- 
posed of. The culverts were kept clear of snow and ice during the 
winter and the sediment was removed when necessary. 

Pkotection of the Water Supply. 

Sanitary Inspection. 

A sanitary inspector, two watershed inspectors and one tempo- 
rary and three permanent watchmen were employed to prevent 
pollution of the water supply. Their duties include the inspection 
of ice-cutting operations and fishing through the ice at various 
reservoirs and ponds where such operations are permitted during 
the winter; the prevention of bathing and unauthorized boating and 
fishing in the reservoirs during the summer; examination of condi- 
tion of premises on the watersheds; and the obtaining of information 
for a sanitary census which is taken every five years. 

The following tables contain a summary of the sanitary inspections 
and of the sanitary census by districts for 1920; also a summary of 
the sanitary census of 1915 for each watershed for comparison: — 



104 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



107 



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108 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

During the year 25 cottages, 4 garages and 1 stable were con- 
structed on lands adjoining the water works land at Lake Cochituate, 
and as 2 cottages were burned there are now on these adjoining 
lands 167 cottages, 22 garages and 3 stables. 

There were 5 cottages constructed on land bordering on Whitehall 
Reservoir during the year, and the number of boats on the reservoir 
was increased by 3 rowboats and a motor boat during the year, 
making a total of 71 cottages, 88 rowboats, 6 motor boats and 26 
canoes. 

Filtration and Chlorination. 

On the Wachusett watershed the surface water from 525 acres in 
the village of Sterling was filtered at the Sterling filter beds, except 
for five hours on March 14 when the inflow was greater than the 
capacity of the filters. The sewage from the Worcester County 
Training School, occupied by about 68 persons, was purified at the 
filter beds on Beaman Street in West Boylston. The Gates Ter- 
race filter beds at Sterling Junction were operated throughout the 
year. The cost of maintaining all of these filters was $818.35. 

On the Sudbury watershed the surface water from an area of 2 
square miles in Marlborough was filtered at the Marlborough Brook 
filter beds before it entered the Sudbury Reservoir, with the excep- 
tion that on six days, from March 13 to 18, inclusive, 65,600,000 
gallons overflowed into Sudbury Reservoir after being sterilized 
with calcium hypochlorite. 

At the combined storage reservoir and filter bed on Farm Road 
dilute sewage from the Marlborough main sewer was received on 23 
days in March, 19 days in April, 13 days in May and 12 days in 
June. This unusual condition was due principally to the clogging 
up of the sewer to such an extent that prolonged overflow took place 
into the additional sewer before the Marlborough officials obtained 
suitable apparatus for cleaning out the main sewer. The ground 
water from the additional sewer flowed into settling basin No. 5 
on every month in the year, and almost continuously from January 
1 to the middle of September. The periodical cleaning out of the 
settling reservoir, which was deferred last year, was accomplished 
this year under favorable circumstances, and 2,486 cubic yards of 
sediment were taken out and sold to the owner of the adjoining 
lands. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 109 

The Southborough swimming pool, including appurtenant grounds, 
filter bed and drainage ditch, was cared for as usual. 

The surface water from the brook which flows through the former 
Town Farm land on Pleasant Street, in Framingham, has all been 
diverted satisfactorily through the intercepting ditch constructed 
last year, and filtered at an old gravel pit before entering Framing- 
ham Reservoir No. 3. 

The cost of filtration and chlorination on the Sudbury watershed 
was $6,893.18. 

On the Cochituate watershed the surface water from the thickly 
settled area of 0.55 of a square mile tributary to Pegan Brook, and 
from an additional area of 0.54 of a square mile further north and 
tributary to the intercepting ditch, was pumped and filtered at the 
Pegan filtration works before entering Lake Cochituate, with the 
exception of about 32,000,000 gallons from Pegan Brook on 14 days 
in March, and about 78,000,000 gallons from the intercepting ditch 
on 25 days in March, 15 days in April, 1 day in May and 1 day in 
June, all of which overflowed directly into the lake after being 
sterilized with calcium hypochlorite. 

The pumping station was operated on 266 days, and 299,945,000 
gallons of surface water, equivalent to an average of 819,500 gal- 
lons per day for the entire year, were pumped to the filter beds. 
The cost of operating and maintaining the pumping station, grounds 
and filter beds was $5,967.74 for labor, $1,322.87 for fuel and $436.01 
for supplies and expenses, making a total of $7,726.62, or at the rate 
of $25.76 per million gallons filtered. The cost per million foot 
gallons for fuel was 39 cents. 

The grounds and filter beds are in good condition, but the pump- 
ing plant which has been in service for seventeen years is now ob- 
solete and should be replaced by a modern plant of higher efficiency. 

Improvement of Swamps and Brooks. 

The ditches maintained in the swamps on the watersheds for im- 
proving the quality of the water were cleaned and weeds and brush 
mowed for a width of 10 to 20 feet on both sides where necessary, 
at a cost of $3,419 for the 27.73 miles of ditches connected with the 
Wachusett works, and a cost of $1,626.18 for the 8.94 miles con- 
nected with the Sudbury works. This last amount includes the 



110 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

cost of making quite extensive repairs required because of the 
rotting out of the board substructure in many places, in repairing 
which it was necessary to remove and replace 570 square yards of 
stone paving and to relay 686 linear feet of new bottom boards and 
889 linear feet of new timbers made from 4 inch by 4 inch joists 
split diagonally for supporting the toe of the stone paving. 

Wire fences were built along the property line of the pasture of 
James B. McHale, adjacent to Big Crane Swamp in NoKthborough, 
for a length of 2,358 feet to keep the cattle out of the ditches. 

The work of completing the improvement at Gates Brook in West 
Boylston was again deferred because of the high cost of labor and 
materials. 

Purchase of Land. 

For the protection of the water supply on the Wachusett water- 
shed 6.507 acres of land on Main Street, Boylston, and in Wausha- 
cum Park, Sterling, were acquired during the year, and the club- 
house owned by the Clinton Outing Club, 3 summer cottages, 2 
garages, a boathouse, pump house and other small buildings, and 
the water and lighting systems owned by Herbert C. Fisher, were 
removed from the water works property in Waushacum Park on 
Middle Waushacum Pond, in Sterling; but as the 3 cottages were 
removed to adjacent land at the close of the year, there were 8 
summer cottages at Waushacum Park located on private land close 
to the water works land. 

A small parcel of land located on the easterly shore of Whitehall 
Reservoir in the Sudbury watershed, containing .01 of an acre, was 
acquired to adjust the boundary of the water works land at this 
place. 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works. 
Pumping Station. 

On account of the large amount of surface water permitted to 
enter the sewer by the town of Clinton the inflow at times between 
March 13 and June 3 was greater than the pumping capacity, and 
sewage overflowed directly into the Nashua River, but at these 
times the overflow was diluted by discharging water into the river 
from the Wachusett Reservoir. 

The sewage was pumped with the electrically driven 12-inch De- 
Laval centrifugal pump, and the quantity pumped is equivalent to 



1921.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



Ill 



an average of 863,700 gallons per day. The energy for operating 
the pump was furnished from the Wachusett power station at all 
times except from June 3 to June 10, inclusive, while repairs were 
being made at the Wachusett power station, when the pump was 
operated with energy purchased from the Clinton Gas Light Com- 
pany, which made an emergency connection with our feeder line 
and furnished 2,506 kilowatt hours for $137.83. The pumping sta- 
tistics are as follows : — 

Total pumpage (gallons), . • . . 316,109,000 

Average pumpage (gallons per day), . 863,700 

Electric energy used (kilowatt hours), 106,704 

Pumpage per kilowatt hour (gallons), 2,962 

Average lift (feet), 49.6 

Efficiency of pumping unit and transmission line (per cent), . . 51.4 

Coal used for burning sludge and heating (pounds), . . . . 51,186 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, . $1,753 18 

Electric energy from Wachusett power station at $5.30 per thou- 
sand kilowatt hours, . . 552 25 

Electric energy purchased from Clinton Gas Light Company, . 137 83 

Coal for burning sludge and heating, ■ . 186 48 

Repairs and supplies, 315 06 



Total for station, . $2,944 80 



Cost per million gallons, 
Cost per million foot gallons, 



$9,316 

. 18782 



The 35-horsepower Blake & Knowles pumping engine with air 
pump and jet condenser, and the 50-horsepower locomotive type 
boiler installed in 1899, which were used for pumping the sewage at 
this station prior to the installation of the electric equipment in 
1912, but were no longer serviceable, were sold in place to H. 
Aronofsky & Sons of Boston for $287.50. A portable hoisting engine 
boiler from the storage yard has been used to furnish steam tem- 
porarily for heating purposes until permanent heating apparatus is 
installed. 

Filters. 

After sedimentation in the settling basins to separate the liquid 
from the heavy portion of the sewage, about 80 per cent of the liquid 
was filtered on the 25 1-acre filter beds in regular doses of 57,000 



112 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

gallons in 30 minutes at intervals of about 1^ days, which is equiva- 
lent to an average rate of filtration of about 36,800 "gallons per 
acre per day. The remaining liquid was drawn from the settling 
basins into the two J-acre sludge beds, where additional sedimenta- 
tion and filtration took place. 

The carrier distributors on 24 of the filter beds have been put 
into first-class condition by relaying portions of the concrete bot- 
toms, replacing many of the iron brackets and supports, renewing 
or repairing the wooden sides and by painting where required. 

The cost of filtration during 1920 was as follows: — 

Labor, t $7,265 98 

Supplies and expenses, 1,706 30 

Total, $8,972 28 

Cost per million gallons, $28 38 



The character of the effluent from the filters for the past five 
years is shown by the following table : — ■ 



[Parts per 100,000.] 



1916. 



1917. 



1918. 



1919. 



1920. 



Albuminoid ammonia, sewage, 
Albuminoid ammonia, effluent, 
Reduction (per cent), 
Free ammonia, sewage, . 
Free ammonia, effluent, . 
Reduction (per cent), 
Nitrogen as nitrates, effluent, 
Iron, effluent, .... 



Average quantity of sewage filtered (gallons 
per day). 



1.0255 
.0983 
90 

2.7850 
1.0316 
63 

.3693 
1.052 
1,225,000 



.8652 
.1383 
84 

3.4707 
1.7658 
49 

.20165 
2.036 
1,050,000 



.8792 
.1439 
83.6 
3.2300 
1.5094 
53 
.2866 
1.903 
1,037,000 



.6265 
.0908 
86 

3.0925 
1.5571 
50 

.1818 
2.5644 
1,168,000 



.7302 
.0850 
88 

3.1120 
1.6743 
46 
.3098 
2.099 
863,700 



The results show that the filters are of insufficient capacity to 
purify properly the large quantity of surface water and sewage now 
received from the sewers, but before making any further expendi- 
tures for enlarging the purification works it is desirable that the 
town of Clinton should exercise its authority under chapter 433 of 
the Acts of 1909 and require the removal of a large quantity of 
surface water and manufacturing wastes which now enter the sewers 
and prevent the satisfactory operation of the purification works. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



113 



FORESTRY. 

Wachusett Lands. 

Parcels of water works land bordering on the Wachusett Reservoir 
or its tributary streams in Clinton, Boylston and Sterling, which 
had recently been burned over or were grown to chestnut trees 
affected by the bark disease, having a total area of 61 acres, were 
cleared for planting with pine seedlings. This work cost about $51 
per acre, but as railroad ties, fence posts and cordwood to the value 
of $1,908 were obtained, the net cost is about $20 per acre. 

Water works land in Clinton, Boylston, West Boylston and 
Sterling, comprising 34 acres of the cleared areas and 17 acres re- 
quiring no preliminary clearing, were planted with 32,700 white 
pine seedlings five years old from the Oakdale nursery, and 19,700 
red pine seedlings four years old from the Amherst nursery of the 
State Department of Conservation. The cost of preparing and 
planting the trees was $16.20 per thousand or $17.28 per acre. 

Plantings along the margins of the Wachusett Reservoir in Clin- 
ton, Sterling and West Boylston, and along the shore of the open 
channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct in Southborough, aggregating 
101 acres, were filled in, where the original trees had failed, with 
18,500 white pine seedlings four to six years old from the Oakdale 
nursery, and 5,700 red pine seedlings four years old from the State 
nursery at Amherst. 

Twelve hundred and ninety-one maple seedlings obtained from 
the woods on the water works lands were set out along main high- 
ways adjoining the Wachusett Reservoir to fill in where previous 
plantings had failed. This work cost $445.26. 

At the end of the year the Oakdale nursery contained the follow- 
ing seedlings : — 



White pine 2 years old in transplant beds, 
White pine 3 years old in transplant beds, 
White pine 4 years old in transplant beds, 
Red pine 4 years old in transplant beds, 
White spruce 9 years old in transplant beds, 
Maple 4 years old transplanted from field, 



1,800 

12,300 

35,400 

5,000 

7,000 

325 



Total, 



61,825 



1U METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Mature white pine and hemlock trees from scattering locations on 
the margins of the reservoir were cut into saw logs and made into 
lumber for repair work on swamp drainage ditches and miscellaneous 
work in connection with water works operations, at a cost of 
$1,252.47, and about 31,000 feet of lumber were secured at about 
one-half the prevailing retail price of the lumber. 

The improvement thinning in Big Crane Swamp, Westborough, 
which was in progress at the beginning of the year, was continued 
until early in February, when it was suspended. About 2 acres of 
swamp land on which there was a thick growth of cedars was im- 
proved at a cost of $1,050.54. From this operation we obtained 
1,200 fence posts and 44 cords of wood and logs, from which about 
275,000 shingles will be obtained. The estimated value of these 
materials is $1,600. 

The trees and shrubbery at the Wachusett Dam, and the trees on 
water works land adjacent to the main highways at the Wachusett 
Reservoir, Waushacum Pond and the Sterling and Clinton sewerage 
filter beds and on several large areas of forest land on the margins 
of the Wachusett Reservoir, which were badly infested with gypsy 
moths, were sprayed with 7,010 pounds of arsenate of lead during 
June and July at a cost of $1,866.82. 

In January, February and December about 10,000 egg clusters of 
the gypsy moth, found on trees and shrubbery at the Wachusett 
Dam, were painted with creosote at a cost of $169.42. 

During June, July and August many of the white pine plantings 
on the marginal lands around the reservoir and along the open chan- 
nel of the Wachusett Aqueduct were inspected for the pine-tree 
weevil on two occasions, and about 27,800 infected shoots were cut 
and burned at a cost of $537.16. 

The total cost of protecting the trees and plantings from insects 
during the year was $2,573.40. 

The usual fire patrol service was maintained, and of a number of 
fires on water works lands only two resulted in any considerable 
damage, the others being extinguished in their infancy by our patrol- 
men or labor forces. 

On May 17 a neighbor who was burning brush in Boylston, in a 
pasture adjoining water works land, lost control of the fire, which 
burned over 4f acres planted to white pine seedlings in 1918 and 
2\ acres planted to white pine seedlings in 1908, destroying 5,100 
of the smaller trees and about 1,500 of the larger ones. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 115 

On December 25 sparks from a locomotive on the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad started a fire among the young pines 
on a lot in Marlborough, near the terminal chamber of the Wachu- 
sett Aqueduct, and burned over 5f acres of land planted in 1917, 
destroying about 5,200 white pine trees from 1 to 3 feet high. 

The brush, grass and weeds were mowed and burned on about 2 
miles of the marginal fire guard, which is 40 feet wide, and on 44 
miles of forest road 15 to 45 feet wide. This mowing cost $42 
per mile. 

The work of clearing all brush and undergrowth and trimming 
trees within a marginal strip 100 feet in width along main highways 
bordering the water works land around the Wachusett Reservoir 
was continued in January and December. At the close of the year 
83 acres along 5| miles of highway had been improved in this man- 
ner at a cost of $26.41 per acre. Railroad ties, fence posts and 
cordwood valued at $215 were obtained from this work, making the 
net cost $23.83 per acre. 

During the construction of the Wachusett Reservoir samples of 
wood from 64 varieties of trees growing on the site of the reservoir 
were collected and carefully marked and preserved. These samples 
were presented to the Clinton Historical Society on May 16, and 
they will be kept and displayed at the society's rooms. 

At the close of the year the Wachusett lands may be classified 
as follows : — 



Forest lands acquired and not since improved, . 
Forest lands acquired and since improved, .... 

Land which has been planted with trees and not since improved, 
Land which has been planted with trees and since improved, 

Land to be planted with trees, 

Open land which will probably not be planted, .... 
Marginal strip along shore of the reservoir, .... 



Acres. 

1,394 
338 
281 

1,285 
608 
806 
212 



Total, 4,924 

The total expenditure for forestry on the Wachusett lands during 
1920 amounts to $14,138.99. 

Sudbury and Cochituate Lands. 

At the Sudbury Reservoir nursery there were about 100,000 
white pine seedlings at the beginning of the year, of which about 
5,000 were later destroyed by the May beetle grub. Of the re- 



116 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

mainder, 18,800 seedlings were set out to fill in failures in previous 
plantings; 6,250 were used to replace trees destroyed by fire; 17,700 
were set out in new plantings at Pine Hill and other places where 
the land had been cleared; 4,000 were used at Whitehall Reservoir; 
and 500 were used on the islands in Framingham Reservoir No. 3. 
There were about 48,000 white pine seedlings four years old in the 
nursery at the end of the year. 

Five and one-half acres of water works land at Pine Hill on the 
Taylor lot were cleared by the water works forces, and 4,500 chestnut 
fence posts 8 feet in length were obtained from this work, and about 
10 acres of land were cleared by parties who bought birch wood. 

At Sudbury Reservoir 22,500 gypsy moth egg masses were painted 
with creosote at a cost of $112.87. The trees on about 120 acres 
below Sudbury Dam, along highways and around the reservoir, were 
sprayed with arsenate of lead at a cost of $450.75. The new one- 
horse sprayer purchased early in the year proved to be very con- 
venient and useful for work along the narrow roadways. 

The tops of 17,400 pine trees were cut and burned to destroy 
the pine-tree weevil, at a cost of $450.33. 

The apple trees and shrubbery below the Sudbury Dam were 
sprinkled with scalecide. 

At Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3 the trees were sprayed 
with arsenate of lead, and at Hopkinton Reservoir, below the dam, 
the tops of 4,000 pine trees attacked by the weevil were cut and 
burned. 

At Lake Cochituate and along the aqueducts $439.50 was ex- 
pended in painting 64,000 gypsy moth egg masses with creosote, 
$21 in cutting and burning the tops of 2,000 pine trees attacked by 
weevils, and $645.60 in spraying trees with arsenate of lead. 

From the nursery at Lake Cochituate 10,000 white pine seedlings 
four years old were transplanted to the Cochituate Aqueduct lands 
at Beethoven Avenue, Newton, at a cost of $199. 

Very few brown-tail moth caterpillars were noticed during the 
year. 

There were six fires on the Sudbury and Cochituate lands, five 
of them at Sudbury Reservoir and the other at Lake Cochituate. 
All but one of them were of unknown origin. Over 4,500 trees 
were destroyed valued at $725. 

The total amount expended for forestry on the Sudbury and 
Cochituate lands was $9,794.44. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 117 



Distribution Reservoir Lands. 

Gypsy and brown-tail moths and elm-leaf beetles were destroyed 
on distribution reservoir lands, as in former years, by spraying the 
foliage with arsenate of lead during the crawling season, and by 
painting the gypsy moth egg clusters with creosote and burning 
the brown-tail moth webs during the winter. 

Oyster scale, found on shrubs at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, was 
destroyed by using scalecide and Arlington oil. 

The leaders on pine trees at the Weston Reservoir, which were 
infested with the pine-tree weevil, were cut off and burned. 

Underbrush and dead trees have been cut at various places in 
connection with the care of the wooded areas. 

The total expenditure for all of the work on the distribution 
reservoir lands described above was $2,371.77. 

The fine row of English elm trees along Beacon Street on the 
southerly side of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, which were set out 
by the city of Boston water department in 1876, and are known as 
the Centennial elms, have begun to die, apparently from lack of 
nourishment due to construction of impervious street surface on 
one side and to the limited extent of good soil on the other. An 
attempt has been made to prolong the life of these trees by cutting 
out the dead wood and by placing additional soil enriched with 
manure just beyond the limits of the existing roots. This work was 
begun in November, and was in progress at the close of the year, 
the total expenditure to that time having been $1,700. 

Hydro-electric Service. 

The total quantity of electric energy delivered during the year 
from the two hydro-electric stations, which are operated with the 
power of the water drawn from the Wachusett and Sudbury reser- 
voirs, is 16,192,191 kilowatt hours. The total value of the energy 
at contract prices, including rentals amounting to $139 for trans- 
mission line locations, is $91,282.92. The total expenses charged 
to both stations and transmission lines is $47,519.80, leaving a 
profit from the operation of the stations of $43,763.12, equivalent to 
$2,703 per thousand kilowatt hours. The total energy generated 
with water wasted and not used for water supply during the year 
was 3,973,908 kilowatt hours, which were sold for the sum of 
$21,679.66. 



118 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 



Wachusett Service. 

The Wachusett power station was operated on 289 days during 
the year, and all energy not used in connection with the operation 
of the Metropolitan Water W T orks was sold to the New England 
Power Company and the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of 
Boston, under contract dated January 13, 1917. 

According to the provisions of this contract the companies are 
required to maintain and operate the 66,000-volt transmission line 
constructed and owned by the Commonwealth, which extends for 
a distance of about 16 miles between the Wachusett and Sudbury 
power stations. 

At the beginning of the year the New England Power Company 
had completed a connecting line from the Wachusett Dam to its 
substation in Clinton, and the Edison Electric Illuminating Company 
of Boston had completed a connecting line from the Sudbury Dam 
to its L Street power station in South Boston, and some of the pre- 
liminary tests necessary for putting the transmission lines in service 
had been completed. The new transmission lines were put into 
regular service January 19. 

As a result of constructing the high-tension transmission line be- 
tween the Wachusett and Sudbury power stations it has been pos- 
sible to sell energy considerably in excess of what would otherwise 
have been possible. 

By permission granted October 20, 1919, the New England Power 
Company made a connection with the Wachusett-Sudbury line near 
pole No. 277, about one-third of a mile below the upper dam on the 
open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct, for a branch line to the 
substation of the Marlborough Electric Light Company. This con- 
necting line was put into service March 2. 

During the year the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of 
Boston constructed a branch line to its Framingham substation. For 
a distance of about 2,222 feet this branch line is located on Sud- 
bury Aqueduct land under a permit granted December 24, 1919. 

The transmission line owned by the Commonwealth has given 
satisfactory service and only minor repairs have been necessary, 
except in connection with an accident which occurred at pole No. 
376, Southborough, on September 23, when the New England Power 
Company was demonstrating a method for replacing insulators with 
the line in service. As a result of this accident one of its linemen 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 119 

was killed and another was seriously injured. The transmission line 
conductors were burned off and telephone cables at the TVachusett 
power station were burned out. The company replaced the latter 
with a new cable 1,600 feet in length, equipped with modern pro- 
tective appliances, and repaired all damage to the transmission 
line. 

About 8.40 a.m., May 3, while the head- electrician and operator 
were attempting to correct a fault in the operation of the hydraulic 
governor on turbine No. 4, the electrician slipped and fell to the 
floor, and the governor was accidentally disconnected from the 
waterwheel. This allowed the wicket gates, which were nearly wide 
open, to close suddenly, and the resulting water ram broke out a 
large section of the top portion of the scroll case. The results were 
similar to those following the break in the case of turbine Xo. 2 
from the same cause last year, which is fully described in the pre- 
vious annual report. At the time of the accident exciter Xo. 1 
and the four generating units were operating under full load. The 
electrician and operator were washed out of the station by the water. 
The helper left the station when the break occurred, and as it was 
impossible to enter the station and close the valves on the penstock 
because of the volume of water discharged from the break, it was 
necessary to shut off the water by closing the sluice gates in the 
dam, and the electric power not being available this had to be done 
by hand, but was completed twenty minutes after the accident oc- 
curred. As a result of the accident the automatic switches on both 
of the main feeders opened and the energy from generators Xos. 
1, 2 and 3 flowed into generator Xo. 4, and the resulting short cir- 
cuit burned out about one-third of the stator coils in that generator. 
Generators Xos. 1, 2 and 3 were only slightly damaged, but exciter 
Xo. 1 was damaged so that it was necessary to rewind the field and 
armature coils. 

As in the case of the former break in 1919, repairs have been 
made by the Standardizing and Testing Department of the Edison 
Electric Illuminating Company of Boston, assisted by water works 
employees and the Lundin Electric and Machine Company of Bos- 
ton. In connection with this work an employee of the latter com- 
pany was accidentally electrocuted on May 25. 

Units Nos. 1 and 2 were put into regular service again on May 
24, unit No. 3 on May 28, and unit Xo. 4 had not been repaired 
at the close of the vear. 



120 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Expenditures for the repair work completed at the close of the 
year amounted to $8,845.60. 

Although the hydraulic governors had been overhauled and ad- 
justed by the manufacturer in February they were not operating 
satisfactorily, and a short time before the accident occurred arrange- 
ments had been made and orders had been placed for changing them 
from the closed to the open system, but at the time of the accident 
the changes had not been made. As a result of further consider- 
ation it was deemed best to make changes in the old governors so 
that they could not be disconnected from the turbines, and use them 
temporarily until entirely new governing apparatus of the latest 
improved type shall have been installed. In connection with the 
changes which have been made in the old governors it was neces- 
sary to install an electric air compressor for charging the governor 
oil pressure tanks before starting a unit. Provision has been made 
in the estimates for 1921 for the new governing apparatus, and for 
replacing the broken top section of the scroll case of unit No. 4 
with a new casting. 

The nut by which the valve stem is attached to the wedge of 
the 48-inch hydraulic valve on the penstock line to unit No. 2 broke 
on July 7, and this unit was out of service thirteen days while re- 
pairs were being made. 

The Wachusett hydro-electric statistics for the year 1920 are as 
follows : — 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours), 9,845,345 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours), .... 35,985 



Available energy (kilowatt hours) , 9,809,360 

Water used (gallons), 46,329,800,000 

Average head (feet) , 96 . 9 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours), . . 2. 193 

Efficiency of station (per cent) , 69 . 8 

Credits : — 

Energy sold New England Power Company and 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company, 9,705,- 
162 kilowatt hours at $0.0053, .... $51,437 36 

Deduction of 2 per cent as provided in contract, 
beginning April 1, 139,317 kilowatt hours at 
$0.0053, 738 38 



$50,698 98 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 121 

Credits — Con. 

Energy furnished Clinton sewerage pumping sta- 
tion, 104, 198 kilowatt hours at $0.0053, . . $552 25 
Rental, transmission line location, . . . . , 139 00 

$51,390 23 



Charges : — 

Superintendence, $1,377 12 

Labor, operating station, 10,275 86 

Repairs and supplies : — 

Power station, $3,557 39 

Transmission line, . . . . 77 08 

3,634 47 



$15,287 45 

Taxes, 2,800 00 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 

sinking fund, 9,690 69 



27,778 14 

Profit, $23,612 09 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours, ... $2 . 832 

Sudbury Service. 

The Sudbury power station was operated on 305 days during the 
year, and on 157 of these days the station was operated two shifts 
of 8 hours each, and on the remaining 148 days was operated with 
three shifts of 8 hours each. It was not necessary to operate the 
station on a Sunday or holiday during the year. 

The station was operated three shifts, at times, to maintain the 
water supply for the District, and at other times to utilize the 
waste water for the generation of electric energy, and. on this account 
the wheels were operated much of the time at maximum capacity 
rather than at maximum efficiency, and the average efficiency for 
the year is slightly less than for 1919, but the output is about 20 
per cent greater. 

All the water drawn from the Sudbury Reservoir was used to 
generate electricity. Some water not needed at Weston Reservoir 
for the supply of the District was passed through turbines Nos. 1 
and 2 into the Weston Aqueduct head house, and turned back 
through the No. 3 60-inch pipe line and discharged through the 24- 
inch gates into the open channel to Framingham Reservoir No. 3. 
A total of 4,163,800,000 gallons was diverted in this manner, from 



122 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

which 370,750 kilowatt hours of energy were obtained and sold for 
$2,317.19. A total of 3,145,100,000 gallons of water not needed for 
water supply was passed through turbine No. 3 into the open chan- 
nel and Framingham Reservoir No. 3, from which 474,489 kilowatt 
hours of energy were obtained which were sold for $2,965.56. 

Inspections were made several times during the year of .the wheel 
pits and the portions of the machinery located below the power 
station floor. On November 4 a water-soaked pine log 6| feet in 
length and about 6 inches in diameter was found wedged in the 
wicket gate links of unit No. 3, which was removed with consider- 
able difficulty. It had forced the shaft against one side of the 
steady bearings and caused considerable wear on the lignum-vitse 
blocks and a noticeable thumping of the generator which ceased 
when the steady bearings were adjusted. 

Brush and weeds were cut and burned twice during the year on 
the portion of the 13,800-volt transmission line to Hopkinton owned 
by the Commonwealth, which extends for a distance of 4,000 feet 
from the Sudbury Dam to Brewer Road. 

On February 7 energy was first delivered from the Sudbury power 
station to the Wachusett-Sudbury transmission line, and since that 
date both the Hopkinton and Wachusett-Sudbury lines have been 
available for the transmission of electric energy developed at the 
Sudbury power station. 

The Sudbury hydro-electric statistics for the year 1920 are as 
follows : — 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours), 6,393,390 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours), .... 10,559 



Available energy (kilowatt hours), 6,382,831 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 service: — 

Water used (gallons), 30,353,000,000 

Average head (feet), 64.77 

Weston Aqueduct service : — 

Water used (gallons), 20,255,500,000 

Average head (feet), 37.49 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours), . . 2.346 

Efficiency of station (per cent), 74.7 

Credits : — 
Energy sold Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston, 

6,382,831 kilowatt hours at $0.00625, $39,892 69 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 48. 123 

Charges : — 

Superintendence, 81,494 50 

Labor, operating station, 10,723 03 

Repairs and supplies, 718 01 

Alterations and additions : — 

Labor, S31 50 

Apparatus and supplies, . 23 65 

— ■ 55 15 



812,990 69 



Taxes, 1,463 20 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 

sinking fund, 5,287 77 

— 119,741 66 

Profit, 820,151 03 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours, ... 3 . 093 

Distribution Pumping Service. 

The total quantity of water pumped at the five distribution 
pumping stations during the year was 32,644/780,000 gallons, and 
3,251,300,000 gallons, or 11.06 per cent, more than the quantity 
pumped in 1919. Of the total quantity of water supplied to the 
Metropolitan Water District in 1920, about 69.5 per cent was 
pumped for the northern low, high and extra high services and 
the southern low service, and 0.59 per cent was repumped for the 
southern extra high service. 

The total cost of operating all the pumping stations for the 
year 1920 is $250,117.86. Compared with the previous year there 
is an increase of about 815,000 for operating labor, due to increased 
wages, an increase of about SI 1,200 for repairs and an increase of 
about 825,600 for fuel, making a total increase for these items of 
about 851,800; but as there was a saving of about 8400 in the cost 
of supplies the net increase for the year is about 851,400. 

Fuel. 
At the beginning of the year there were 1,100 gross tons of bi- 
tuminous coal and 1,500 gross tons of anthracite screenings on hand 
at the pumping stations. During the year 8,597 gross tons of 
bituminous coal and 3,368 gross tons of anthracite screenings were 



124 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

purchased. At the close of the year there were 2,270 gross tons of 
bituminous coal and 1,630 gross tons of anthracite screenings on 
hand at the pumping stations. 

During the early part of the year 810 gross tons of bituminous 
coal were received from the George E. Warren Company under a 
contract made in 1919 at a price of $3.09 per gross ton at the 
mines for coal of specified quality, with a specified variation in price 
for variation in quality. Early in February, owing to an increase in 
miners' wages, the company increased the price to $3.10 per net 
ton, equivalent to $3.47 per gross ton at mines, regardless of quality, 
and 827 gross tons were purchased on this basis. Later, in April, 
the company again increased the price to $5 per net ton, or $5.60 
per gross ton at the mines, and further purchase of coal from the 
company was stopped. As 158 tons had already been shipped from 
the mines at the new price it was accepted. 

The remainder of the bituminous coal for operating the pumping 
stations was purchased from time to time from various dealers who 
were able to secure transportation or to load cars assigned for our 
service. A saving of about $4 per net ton was made on all coal pur- 
chased for shipment in assigned cars. 

On account of the high price of bituminous coal considerable 
economy has resulted from burning a mixed fuel containing about 
one-third anthracite screenings and two-thirds bituminous coal. 
For this purpose 1,153 gross tons of anthracite screenings were pur- 
chased from the New England Fuel and Supply Company, and 
2,215 gross tons of anthracite screenings have been obtained from 
local coal yards. 

On August 26, 1920, a new freight tariff went into effect which 
increased the cost of bituminous coal about $1.50 and the cost of 
anthracite screenings about $1.20 per gross ton. 

During the year the cost per net ton of fuel delivered at the 
pumping stations has varied from $5.70 to $18.08 for bituminous 
coal, and from $4 to $7.46 for anthracite screenings. 

The amount and cost of coal received at the pumping stations 
during 1920 was as follows: — 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



125 





Stations (Amount in Gross Ton 


3). 


Average Cost 
in Bins. 5 




_ _o 


*** o 




c3 


i 


i 






Dealek and Kind of Coal. 


ffi s 


££ 


w! 


m 




y 


■ 






-ts So 


-^ a 


+= £2 




a 




o 


• 




2 1 


M 


•+3 "^ 


h 


fcjC rj 


Ah". 


03 


3 




93 -+J 


£zct 


8-3 


p 


.5 3 


■CO 


02 

o 


a 




o. 


O 


O 


oq 


< 


hH 


o 


£ 


Bituminous. 


















E. Russell Norton, 


365.04 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- # 


13.951 


12.461 


George E. Warren Co., . 


- 


361.61 


- 


- 


_ 


-* 


7.00 


6.25 


E. Russell Norton, 


- 


936.56 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13.04 


11.64 


New England Fuel & Supply Co., 


- 


95.63 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11.55 


10.31 


George E. Warren Co., . 


- 


- 


1,243.24 


- 


- 


- 


6.98 


6.23 


E. Russell Norton, 


- 


- 


2,532.63 


- 


- 


- 


13.13 


11.72 


Potts Run Coal Sales Corp., 


- 


- 


780.94 


- 


- 


- 


8.87 


7.92 


New England Coal & Coke Co., . 


- 


.- 


291.83 


- 


- 


- 


10.51 


9.38 


New England Fuel & Supply Co., 


- 


- 


238.62 


- 


- 


- 


11.74 


10.48 


Thomas Joseph McCue, 


- 


- 


111.70 


- 


- 


- 


17.86 


15.95 


George E. Warren Co., . 


- 


- 


- 


97.11 


- 


- 


8.19 


7.31 


Thomas Joseph McCue, 


- 


- 


- 


663.24 


- 


- 


16.35 


14.60 


Potts Run Coal Sales Corp., 


- 


- 


- 


193.95 


- 


- 


10.17 


9.08 


New England Coal & Coke Co., . 


- 


- 


- 


155.60 


- 


- 


14.31 


12.78 


New England Fuel & Supply Co., 


- 


- 


- 


48.10 


- 


- 


13.73 


12.26 


Spring Coal Co., 


- 


- 


- 


39.22 


- 


- 


8.85 


7.90 


Locke Coal Co., . 


- 


- 


- 


31.606 


- 


- 


13.12 


11.71 


George E. Warren Co., . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


45.31 


- 


7.35 


6.56 


E. Russell Norton, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


83.80 


- 


12.15 


10.85 


New England Coal & Coke Co., . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


105.89 


- 


14.87 


13.28 


Thomas Joseph McCue, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


68.75 


- 


13.87 


12.38 


George E. Warren Co., . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


47.46 


7.42 


6.63 


Potts Run Coal Sales Corp., 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


48.88 


9.58 


8.56 


Roxbury Coal Co., 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10.296 


12.32 


11.00 


Totals (8,597.00 tons), 


365.04 


1,393.80 


5,198.96 


1,228.82 


303.75 


106.63 


- 


- 


Average Cost : — 


















In bins (gross ton), 


13.951 


11.37 


10.91 


14.04 


12.77 


8.88 


- 


- 


In bins (net ton), 


12.46 1 


10.15 


9.74 


12.54 


11.40 


7.93 


- 


- 


On cars or trucks (gross ton), 


13.62 


10.70 


10.68 


12.93 


12.59 


8.39 


- 


- 


On cars or trucks (net ton), 


12.16 


9.55 


9.54 


11.55 


11.24 


7.49 


- 


- 


Anthracite Screenings. 


















Metropolitan Coal Co., . 


352.456 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5.071 


4.531 


Batchelder Bros., .... 


171.366 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


5.75i 


5.131 


New England Fuel & Supply Co., 


75.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7.46i 


6.661 


New England Fuel & Supply Co., 


- 


274.64 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7.74 


6.91 


Metropolitan Coal Co., . 


- 


52.316 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6.18 


5.52 


Brighton Coal Co., 


- 


78.126 


— 


- 


- 


- 


7.35 


6.56 


John A. Whittemore's Sons, . 


- 


46.796 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5.86 


5.23 


New England Fuel & Supply Co., 


- 


- 


701.88 


- 


- 


- 


6.76 


6.04 


Metropolitan Coal Co., . 


- 


- 


343.356 


- 


- 


- 


6.44 


5.75 


Brighton Coal Co., 


- 


- 


56.936 


- 


- 


- 


6.90 


6.16 


Locke Coal Co., . 


- 


- 


- 


610.836 


- 


- 


7.03 


6.28 


Wilbur W. Fiske & Co., 


- 


- 


- 


1.846 


- 


- 


5.04 


4.50 


Metropolitan Coal Co., . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


244.436 


- 


6.67 


5.95 


New England Fuel & Supply Co., 


- 


- 


- 


- 


101.70 


- 


7.68 


6.86 


Wm. H. Harlow & Sons, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


137.956 


5.60 


5.00 


Batchelder Bros., .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


71.126 


5.60 


5.00 


Roxbury Coal Co., 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


47.366 


5.60 


5.00 


Totals (3,368.06 tons), 


598.81 


451.86 


1,102.16 


612.67 


346.13 


256.43 


- 


- 


Average cost : — 


















In bins (gross ton), 


5.56 1 


7.30 


6.67 


7.02 


6.96 


5.60 


- 


- 


In bins (net ton), 


4.96i 


6.52 


5.96 


6.27 


6.21 


5.00 


- 


- 


On cars or trucks (gross ton), 


5.24 


5.83 


6.11 


6.07 


6.56 


- 


- 


- 


On cars or trucks (net ton), 


4.68 


5.21 


5.46 


5.42 


5.86 


— 


— 


" 



1 Unloaded in storage pile, later to be transported 300 feet and put into bins. 

2 Hoisted from cars and wheeled to bins. 

3 Dumped from cars into bins. 

4 Unloaded at freight yard, teamed 1J^ miles, and dumped into bins. 

5 Includes cost of unloading coal from cars and all expenses incidental to the mixing and storage of 
the coal. 

* Delivered at station by truck. 



126 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



All coal received during the year was sampled and analyzed and 
the results are as follows: — 



Kind of Coal. 



Nanty Glo, 

Clearfield District, 

Davenport, . 

South Fork, 

Miscellaneous, 

Pool-10, 

Pool-71, 

Melba-3, 

Melba-1, 

Barnet, 

Anthracite screenings, 



Number 

of Samples 

tested. 


Percent- 
age of 
Moisture 
in Coal as 
received. 


23 


4.77 


20 


4.09 


15 


3.06 


18 


2.68 


15 


4.25 


4 


2.78 


4 


2.41 


4 


1.89 


3 


3.66 


1 


3.18 


50 


6.27 



Dry Basis. 



Percent- 
age of 
Volatile 

Matter. 



19.11 
23.66 
19.80 
17.32 
20.40 
15.85 
15.19 
21.90 
23.11 
17.47 
5.13 



Percent- 
age 
of Fixed 
Carbon. 



Percent- 
age 
of Ash. 



British 

Thermal 

Units. 



74.07 


6.82 


62.83 


13.51 


70.31 


9.89 


72.80 


9.88 


70.79 


8.81 


68.82 


15.33 


73.42 


11.39 


66.83 


11.27 


69.77 


7.12 


70.65 


11.88 


78.62 


16.25 



14,729 
13,693 
14,252 
14,192 
14,385 
13,350 
13,973 
14,019 
14,656 
13,864 
12,341 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 

Horizontal return tubular boilers Nos. 1, 2 and 3 were stripped 
of all useful trimmings and connecting flues and pipes in prepara- 
tion for disposing of them and the brick settings to provide space 
for the two new 98-inch diameter vertical fire tube boilers which 
are being built for the station in connection with the installation of 
the new pumping engine No. 16, which will replace engine No. 2, 
but will have a capacity of 15,000,000 gallons per day, or nearly 
double that of the old engine. 

A small steam pump and a sump tank of 104 gallons capacity 
have been installed, and the pipe connections with the three hy- 
draulic valves on the southern high-service pipe lines outside of the 
pumping station have been rearranged so that the valves can be 
operated by using cold test oil instead of water, and the trouble 
from freezing of the water will be avoided. 

At Chestnut Hill pumping station No. 2 new grates of the Per- 
fection shaking and dumping type were installed in boilers Nos. 6 
and 16, and seven new tubes were installed in boiler No. 16 and 
one tube in boiler No. 7. The lower ends of the tubes in boilers 
Nos. 15 and 16 were electro-welded to the lower tube sheet to pre- 
vent leakage caused from expansion and contraction when the boil- 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 127 

ers are put into or taken out of service. A few small fire cracks on 
edges of plates and in rivets were also welded. 

Old stay bolts to the number of 390 in boiler No. 15 and 29 in 
boiler No. 16 were replaced with Tate flexible stay bolts which are 
designed to allow movements due to changes in temperature to take 
place without breaking. 

The installation of the independent rotrex air pump, purchased in 
1919, has been completed, and a noticeable increase in efficiency of 
the low-service engines results from its use, especially when these 
engines are operated at low speed. The rotrex pump is also a great 
convenience when starting the engines. 

As the meter on the low-service boiler feed water line required 
constant repairs, it was replaced in December by a 2 inch x f inch 
improved Type M Venturi meter. The boiler feed water piping was 
rearranged and renewed, and air chambers were placed on both the 
high and low-service boiler feed water lines to prevent water ram, 
with satisfactory results. 

The track for the ash cars was relaid for a distance of 80 feet, 
starting at the elevator which raises the ash cars from the tunnel 
under the boilers to the surface of the ground outside the station. 
A spur track 30 feet in length for the temporary storage of cars was 
also laid, and as a result of these changes all of the ashes for the 
entire twenty-four hours are now removed by daylight during the 
first watch by using the additional ash cars purchased last year. 

At the suggestion of the engine builder, Jenkins No. 94 rubber 
pump valves f of an inch thick without cover plates were installed 
in the high-pressure pump chambers of engine No. 12, on December 
29, in place of the old valves which were f of an inch thick and were 
provided with brass cover plates § of an inch thick. A noticeable 
improvement in the operation of the engine has resulted from this 
change. It is planned to make a similar change in the intermed- 
iate and low-pressure pump valves later if the preliminary trial of 
the new valves continues satisfactory. 

At theses stations 28,768,082,000 gallons of water were pumped 
during the year, of which 15,675,759,000 gallons were supplied to 
the southern high-service district and the southern extra high-serv- 
ice pumping station, and the remainder, 13,092,323,000 gallons, 
was supplied to the southern low-service district. The average 
•daily pumpage was 42,830,000 gallons for the high service and 



128 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan- 



35,771,000 gallons for the low service, with a maximum of 54,847,000 
gallons on January 26 for the high service, and 58,017,000 gallons 
on January 5 for the low service. 

The pumping statistics for these stations for 1920 are as follows: — 

Station No. 1. 
Pumpage and Duty. 





Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 


Engine 
No. 3. 


Engine 
No. 4. 


Totals. 


Pumping capacity (million gallons per day), 


16 


20 


30 


66 


Pumping time (engine hours), . . 


4,288.17 


10.42 


427.33 


4,725.92 


Pumpage, total (million gallons), 1 . 


1,375.51 


8.52 


430.06 


1,814.09 


Pumpage, average daily (gallons), 1 . 


3,758,200 


23,200 


1,175,100 


4,956,500 


Lift, average (feet), 


132.55 


126.05 


128.34 


131.52 


Coal used: — 










Bituminous (pounds), 


- 


- 


- 


2,788,907 


Anthracite screenings (pounds), .... 


- 


- 


- 


1,025,804 


Duty, average (foot pounds per 100 pounds coal), 


- 


- 


- 


52,100,000 



1 Corrected for slip. 



Cost of Pumping. 





Totals. 


Per 
Million 
Gallons. 


Per 
Million 

Foot 
Gallons. 


Electric 
Equiva- 
lent per 
Kilowatt 
Hour. 


Labor (operation and superintendence), 


$19,584 03 


$10 80 


Cents. 
8.21 


Cents. 
2.61 


Fuel, 


14,072 92 


7 76 


5.90 


1.88 


Repairs, . 


9,232 45 


5 09 


3.87 


1.23 


Oil, waste and packing, 


746 02 


41 


.31 


.10 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


859 78 


47 


.36 


.12 


Totals, 


$44,495 20 


$24 53 


18.65 


5.94 


Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund. 


33,233 59 


18 32 


13.93 


4.44 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



129 



Station No. 2. 
Pumpage and Duty. 



Engines 
Nos. 5, 
6 and 7. 



Engine 
No. 12. 



Totals. 



Pumping capacity (million gallons per day), 
Pumping time (engine hours), .... 
Pumpage, total (million gallons), 1 
Pumpage, average daily (gallons), 1 

Lift, average (feet), 

Coal used: — 

Bituminous (pounds), 

Anthracite screenings (pounds), . 

Duty, average (foot pounds per 100 pounds coal), 



105 

12,698.33 

13,092 32 

35,771,400 

29.82 



40 

8,741.25 

13,861.67 

37,873,400 

123.22 



145 

21,439.58 

26,953.99 

73,644,800 

77.85 

10,628,323 

3,968,740 

119,750,000 



1 Corrected for slip. 
Cost of Pumping. 



Totals. 



Per 

Million 
Gallons. 



Per 

Million 

[Foot 

Gallons. 



Electric 
Equiva- 
lent per 
Kilowatt 
Hour. 



Labor (operation and superintendence), 

Fuel 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies, 

Totals, 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund. 



$49,124 77 


$1 82 


59,927 18 


2 22 


25,128 64 


93 


1,656 62 


06 


1,174 87 


05 


$137,012 08 


$5 08 


37,175 84 


1 38 



Cents. 
2.34 

2.86 

1.19 

.08 

.06 



Cents. 



.74 
.91 
.38 
.03 
.02 



6.53 
1.77 



2.08 
.56 



As the boilers have been operated in one battery most of the 
time, the duties of the individual engines at these stations were not 
determined. 

Spot Pond Pumping Station. 

The Green fuel economizer at the Spot Pond pumping station, 
which had been in service for twenty years, was renewed at a cost 
of $4,184.12. This work was completed and the new economizer put 
into service on September 23. 



130 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Guard railing has been erected around the top of the low-pressure 
cylinder of engine No. 9 to protect the employees from accidentally 
falling and receiving injuries. 

All of the water supplied to the northern high-service district was 
pumped at this station. The pumps were operated about 11 hours 
per day, the boilers being maintained with banked fires when not in 
use. 

The northern high-service pumping statistics for 1920 are as 
follows: — 

Spot Pond Station. 
Pumpage and Duty. 



Engine 
No. 8. 



Engine 
No. 9. 



Totals. 



Pumping capacity (million gallons per day), 
Pumping time (engine hours), . 
Pumpage, total (million gallons), 1 
Pumpage, average daily (gallons), 1 

Lift, average (feet), 

Coal used: — 

Bituminous (pounds), 

Anthracite screenings (pounds), 
Duty, average (foot pounds per 100 pounds coal), 



10 

134.50 

58.24 

159,100 

122.62 

38,165 

24,760 

94,550,000 



20 

3,785.25 

3,228.34 

8,820,600 

134.86 

2,222,970 

1,317,337 

102,440,000 



30 

3,919.75 

3,286.58 

8,979,700 

134.64 

2,261,135 

1,342,097 

102,300,000 



H 



1 Corrected for slip. 



Cost of Pumping. 



Totals. 



Per 
Million 
Gallons. 



Per 
Million 

Foot 
Gallons. 



Electric 
Equiva- 
lent per 
Kilowatt 
Hour. 



Labor (operation and superintendence), 

Fuel, 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies, 

Totals 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund. 



$15,580 85 

16,302 11 

5,837 66 

701 99 

556 45 



$38,979 06 
17,278 73 



$4 74 

4 96 

1 78 

21 

17 



$11 86 
5 26 



Cents. 
3.52 

3.68 

1.32 

.16 

.13 



8.81 
3.90 



Cents. 
1.12 

1.17 

.42 

.05 

.04 



2.80 
1.24 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



131 



Arlington Pumping Station. 

All the water supplied to the northern extra high-service district 
during the year was pumped at the Arlington pumping station from 
the northern low-service mains. Only minor repairs have been 
necessary at this station during the year. 

The northern extra high-service pumping statistics for 1920 are 

as follows: — 

Arlington Station. 

Pumpage and Duty. 





Engine 
No. 10. 


Engine 
No. 11. 


Engine 
No. 15. 


Totals. 


Pumping capacity (million gallons per day), 


1.5 


1.5 


3.0 


6 


Pumping time (engine hours), 


7,344.25 


- 


55.00 


7,399.25 


Pumpage, total (million gallons), 1 .... 


312.89 


- 


3.58 


316.47 


Pumpage, average daily (gallons), 1 .... 


854,900 


- 


9,800 


864,700 




283.75 


- 


290.03 


283.82 


Coal used: — 












604,427 


- 


10,948 


615,375 


Anthracite screenings (pounds), .... 


686,172 


- 


7,678 


693,850 


Duty, average (foot pounds per 100 pounds coal) , 


57,300,000 


- 


46,510,000 


57,150,000 


. 



Corrected for slip. 



Cost of Pumping. 



Totals. 



Per 

Million 
Gallons. 



Per 

Million 

Foot 
Gallons. 



Electric 
Equiva- 
lent per 
Kilowatt 
Hour. 



Labor (operation and superintendence), 

Fuel, 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Miscellaneous supplies, 

Totals, 



$10,837 76 

4,977 55 

1,046 90 

201 51 

360 97 



$34 24 

15 73 

3 31 

64 

1 14 



Cents. 
12.07 

5.54 

1.17 

.22 

.40 



Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund. 



$17,424 69 
6,024 23 



$55 06 
19 04 



19.40 
6.71 



Cents. 
3.84 

1.77 

.37 

.07 

.13 



6.18 
2.14 



132 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Hyde Park Pumping Station. 
All of the water supplied to the southern extra high-service dis- 
trict was repumped at the Hyde Park pumping station from the 
southern high-service mains. The pumps were operated about 12 
hours per day, the boilers being maintained with banked fires when 
not in use. 

The southern extra high-service pumping statistics for 1920 are 
a? follows : — 

Hyde Park Station. 
Pumpage and Duty. 



Engine 
No. 13. 



Engine 
No. 14. 



Totals. 



Pumping capacity (million gallons per day), 
Pumping time (engine hours), . 
Pumpage, total (million gallons), 1 
Pumpage, average daily (gallons), 1 

Lift, average (feet), 

Coal used: — ■ 

Bituminous (pounds), 

Anthracite screenings (pounds), 
Duty, average (foot pounds per 100 pounds coal), 



3 

3,373.67 

206.07 

563,000 

139.81 

202,750 

338,696 

44,320,000 



1,102.91 

67.58 

184,700 

138.99 

67,829 

109,584 

44,100,000 



6 

4,476.58 

273.65 

747,700 

139.60 

270,579 

448,280 

44,270,000 



1 Corrected for slip. 



Cost of Pumping. 



Totals. 



Per 

Million 
Gallons. 



Per 

Million 

Foot 
Gallons. 



Electric 
Equiva- 
lent per 
Kilowatt 
Hour. 



Labor (operation and superintendence) , 

Fuel, 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies, 

Totals 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund. 



58,814 76 

1,845 47 

906 80 

285 39 

354 41 



$32 21 
6 74 
3 32 
1 04 
1 30 



Cents. 
23.07 

4.83 

2.37 

.75 

.93 



$12,206 83 
5,034 21 



$44 61 
18 40 



33.95 
13.18 



Cents. 
7.35 

1.54 

.75 

.24 

.30 



10.18 
4.-20 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



133 



Distribution Reservoirs. 

The locations, elevations and capacities of the distribution reser- 
voirs of the Metropolitan Water Works are shown by the following 
table : — 



Distribution Reservoirs and Locations. 


Elevation of 
High Water. » 


Capacity in 
Gallons. 


Low Service: — ■ 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton district of Boston, 

Northern High Service: — 

Northern Extra High Service: — 
Southern High Service: — 

Southern Extra High Service: — 
Bellevue Reservoir steel tank, West Roxbury district of Boston, . 


163.00 
134.00 
200.00 
157.00 

271.00 
300.00 

442.00 

251.00 
264.50 
192.00 
251.00 

375.00 


1,791,700,000 

300,000,000 

200,000,000 

26,200,000 

41,400,000 
2,450,000' 

550,000 

15,500,000 

13,500,000 

5,100,000 

330,000 

2,500,000 


Total, 


- 


2,399,230,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston city base. 



By arrangement with the city of Chelsea a portion of the main- 
tenance of its reservoir on Powder Horn Hill is assumed by the 
Metropolitan Water Works, and the reservoir is used when neces- 
sary in connection with the northern high-service supply. The 
reservoir has a capacity of 1,000,000 gallons with high-w T ater line 
at elevation 196.6. The reservoir was in service from January 1 to 
April 21, and during the remainder of the year was kept full of 
water for use in case of emergency. No leakage has been noticed 
from the reservoir since the masonry lining was repaired in 1919. 

By arrangement wdth the city of Maiden the maintenance of its 
standpipe on Waitt's Mount, which the city planned to discontinue 
and dispose of, w T as assumed by the Division in June, and after 



134 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

minor repairs had been made was filled with water on August 5, and 
thereafter was kept full of water for use in case of emergency. The 
standpipe has a storage capacity of 1,120,000 gallons when filled 
to high-water line at elevation 250. 

Weston Reservoir. 

All the ironwork was painted in the channel chamber at the inlet 
to the Weston Reservoir, the screen chamber at the outlet of the 
reservoir and the terminal chamber of the lower Weston Aqueduct. 
The iron fences at Ash Street bridge and at the terminal chamber, 
and the stop planks in the screen chamber, were also painted. A 
new set of screens and a screen elevator were installed at the ter- 
minal chamber. About 2,000 feet of wire fence was rebuilt, and 
the riprap, beaches, lawns, walks, drives and drains about the 
reservoir were kept in good order. 

Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and Waban Hill Reservoirs. 

The gatehouses, screens and grounds at the Chestnut Hill, Fisher 
Hill and Waban Hill reservoirs were given the necessary attention, 
and all the ironwork in the gatehouses was painted. 

At Chestnut Hill Reservoir the Bradlee Basin was in service 
throughout the year, and the Lawrence Basin was in service except 
from December 28 to 31, inclusive. 

The policing of the grounds was transferred to the Park Division 
in May. The cost of this work for the remainder of the year 
amounted to $2,140.61, and was paid by the Water Division. 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs. 

The gatehouses, screens, grounds and fences at Spot Pond and 
the Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs were kept in good condition. The 
woodwork on the exterior and the ironwork in the interior of all the 
gatehouses were painted. New screens were made for the east gate- 
house at Spot Pond and for the gatehouse at Fells Reservoir. The 
roof gutters on the east gatehouse at Spot Pond were rebuilt and 
lined with sheet lead as the old gutters did not drain properly. 

The policing of the grounds at these reservoirs was transferred 
to the Park Division in May, but the cost of the work for the re- 
mainder of the year, amounting to $586.24, was paid by the Water 
Division. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 135 

Bellevue and Forbes Hill Reservoirs. 

All the ironwork connected with the masonry tower at Bellevue 
Reservoir was painted, the windows were repaired, and snow and ice 
were removed from the roof during the winter. 

Forbes Hill Reservoir was kept full of water for emergency use. 
The three lower courses of the standpipe and the iron stairs and 
woodwork of the tower were painted. A new fence enclosing the 
grounds was completed. 

Arlington and Mystic Reservoirs. 
Some minor repairs were made to doors and stairway at the 
Arlington standpipe and to the gatehouse and the concrete walk at 
the Mystic Reservoir. The latter reservoir was in service from 
January 1 to July 14, and for the remainder of the year was kept 
full of water for emergency use. 

Mystic Lake, Conduit and Pumping Station. 

The old Mystic water works structures although not in use were 
given such attention as necessary to keep them in repair. At the 
lake the gatehouse was repaired and woodwork painted. The floor 
of the bridge over the wasteway was relaid and reinforced and the 
elevation of the water in the lake was regulated. 

The old pumping station was occupied by the American Radio 
and Research Corporation until July 1. Since that time alterations 
have been made in preparing it for use as a garage, carpenter shop, 
paint shop and storehouse. The easterly portion, covering about 
2,000 square feet, was transferred to the Park Division for storage 
and other purposes. The brick chimney, 100 feet in height, which 
was in poor condition and dangerous, was razed September 1, and 
about 80,000 bricks were salvaged and cleaned for future use by 
contract at a cost of $1,365.31. 

The stalls in the stable which are no longer used were removed 
and the floor relaid on new timbers. The coping of the French roof 
and the window frames in the roof were repaired and all of the 
sashes were replaced. 



136 ' METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Grounds at Arlington and Hyde Park Pumping Stations. 

The lawns, shrubs and fences at the Arlington and Hyde Park 
pumping stations were cared for and at the Hyde Park pumping 
station the boiler blow-off drain, which had become clogged, was 
dug up and relaid. 

Distribution Pipe Lines. 

The length of the distribution pipe lines owned and operated at 
the close of the year is 126.13 miles, an increase of 0.05 miles during 
the year. 

The pipe lines were patrolled except during the winter when the 
trucks could not be used on account of deep snow. 

Inspections were made of the work of municipalities and public 
service corporations in the vicinity of the pipe lines and gate covers 
were regulated where necessary in connection with the resurfacing 
of streets. 

Salt was placed over the covers of important valves during the 
cold weather to keep them free from ice. 

In September the work of cleaning, oiling and repairing pipe line 
valves, which had been considerably neglected during the last few 
years on account of scarcity of labor, was resumed and is now 
receiving the necessary attention. 

Low-service Mains. 

The 12-inch Venturi meter and register on the connection be- 
tween the Metropolitan Water Works low-service main in Broad- 
way at Marshall Street in Somerville and the local 12-inch main 
were removed on August 18 and replaced with straight pipe. 

A lj-inch disc meter was installed on the service pipe through 
which two houses are supplied from the 30-inch low-service main 
jn Lawrence Road in Somerville. 

Northern High-service Mains. 
During the cold weather the water froze in the pressure cylinder 
of the hydraulic valve outside the pumping station at Spot Pond, 
on the northern high-service force main from engine No. 9, and 
cracked the cylinder, and while replacing with a new cylinder on 
October 14, it was found that the valve stem was also broken at 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 137 

the nut where it is fastened to the wedge. On November 7 the 
broken valve stem was replaced with a new stem made of Monel 
metal. 

The unmetered emergency connection between the northern high- 
service main in Beach Street at Pleasant Street, Revere, was equipped 
with a 12-inch Venturi meter and 12-inch Ross pressure regulator, 
and the connection was opened for regular use on November 19. 
As the city receives increased pressure and better fire protection 
service from this connection it has paid the entire cost of the instal- 
lation, which remains the property of the Division. 

On account of excavations for sewers in Market and Broad streets 
in Lynn, below the northern high-service 16-inch main, it was 
necessary to suspend the main in slings with adjustable screws 
which were left in place for some time after the trench was refilled 
to prevent settlement of the main. 

Southern High-service Mains. 

A 16-inch emergency connection was made on June 24 in Lake 
Street near Commonwealth Avenue in Brighton, between the 20- 
inch southern high-service main laid in 1918 to Watertown and the 
12-inch city of Boston main in Commonwealth Avenue. 

The 6-inch blow-off line from the first 20-inch main laid to Water- 
town in 1897 was relocated in connection with the construction by 
the Park Division of a boulevard along the south shore of the 
Charles River near St. James Avenue in Newton. 

Screw-operated 36-inch gate valve No. 43, in Reservoir Lane at 
the southwest corner of Chestnut Hill pumping station No. 1, was 
changed to hydraulic operation on September 19 and the pressure 
pipes for use in operating both this valve and hydraulic valves 
Nos. 45 and 97 on the southern high-service force mains at this 
place were connected with a steam-operated pump in the station so 
that they can be operated with oil instead of with water, which has 
given trouble from freezing in winter. 

Southern Extra High-service Pipe Lines. 

In connection with the work of widening Hyde Park Avenue in 
Boston it was necessary to relay the 6-inch blow-off line near Win- 
throp Street and adjust covers of valve chambers to the new grade. 



138 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Pipe Bridges. 

Minor repairs were made to pipe bridges at Broadway, Chelsea, 
over the Mystic River, and Walnut Street, Somerville, over the 
Boston & Maine Railroad, and extensive repairs were made at the 
pipe bridges over the Boston & Maine Railroad at Massachusetts 
Avenue in Cambridge at an expense of $400, and at College Avenue, 
Medford, at an expense of $2,085.86, in connection with repairs to 
the highway bridges by the railroad company. 

Pipe Yards. 

No changes have been made at the Chestnut Hill pipe yard and 
only a few minor repairs have been necessary to keep the buildings 
in good condition. 

At the Glenwood pipe yard the hot-water heating system has 
been replaced by steam. Minor repairs were made on the interior 
of the building and the exterior brickwork was repointed. The spur 
track has been relaid, using all new ties to the number of 229, which 
were obtained from water works lands in the Wachusett Section. 

Meters, Regulating Valves and Recording Pressure Gages. 

There are now 69 Venturi meters varying in size from 6 to 60 
inches in diameter connected with the supply and distribution mains. 
Of this number, 62 are on the connections supplying the various 
cities and towns in the Water District. In addition to the Venturi 
meters there are 4 disc meters, 1 torrent meter and 7 detector meters 
used in measuring water supplied to various municipalities, and 1 
disc meter and 1 detector meter used for measuring water supplied 
to the Park Division from the northern high-service mains in the 
Middlesex Fells. There are also 3 Union meters and 1 Crown meter 
belonging to the town of Milton, which are used in measuring water 
supplied from the southern extra high service, and 1 detector meter 
owned by the city of Maiden, which is used for measuring water 
supplied through the fire line at Commercial and Pleasant streets. 

Three men and a light auto truck are now used in the operation 
and care of the meters. They are visited regularly twice each 
week and are also given such additional attention as is necessary 
to keep them in repair and operating satisfactorily. On account of 
the extreme cold weather during the winter months it was necessary 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 139 

to maintain heat in some of the register chambers to prevent the 
water from freezing in the pressure pipes. 

The nine pressure regulating valves installed in the distribution 
mains for reducing the pressure of water supplied to portions of 
Chelsea, East Boston and Hyde Park, and to Nahant, Revere, 
Swampscott and Winthrop, have received the usual attention and 
have controlled the water pressures in a satisfactory manner. 

Recording pressure gages have been maintained at twenty stations 
on the distribution system, and the table in Appendix No. 2, show- 
ing the elevation of the hydraulic grade line at eighteen of these 
stations, has been prepared from the charts. 

Breaks and Leaks. 

About 10 a.m. April 17, a break occurred in the 48-inch low- 
service main in Clinton Road near Dean Road, Brookline, which 
flooded four cellars and washed out several lawns and shrubbery 
beds. As it was not necessary to complete the repairs promptly the 
line was not put in service again until June 4. The cost of repair- 
ing the damage done was $1,334.96, of which $602.26 was for damage 
to private property and $732.70 for repairing the pipe line and street. 

There were 49 minor leaks in mains during the year which were 
repaired at a cost of $2,423.96. Of these leaks 9 were from defec- 
tive wooden joints and were repaired at a cost of $681.17. Of the 
remainder, 35 were at lead joints, 2 on kalomine pipe and 1 on 
account of perforations of a 12-inch main by electrolysis, and 2 
were on J-inch pressure pipes to recording gage and Venturi meter 
register. 

Emergency Pipe Line Service. 

The two f-ton auto trucks, equipped with special bodies and 
gate-operating attachments, put into service in 1917 for operating 
valves quickly in case of emergency, have been in service during the 
entire year. One of the trucks is stationed at the Chestnut Hill 
pipe yard in Brighton for use on the southern portion of the distri- 
bution pipe system, and the other is stationed at the Glenwood pipe 
yard in Medford for use on the northern portion of the pipe system. 
Men are kept on duty ready to operate the trucks in case of emer- 
gency at any time during the day or night. 



140 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Consumption of Water. 

During the year 46,579,167,000 gallons of water were furnished 
to the 18 municipalities in the Metropolitan Water District sup- 
plied from the Metropolitan Water Works. This is equivalent to 
an average daily consumption of 127,265,500 gallons, which, for the 
estimated population of 1,213,430, based on the 1920 census, is at 
the rate of 105 gallons per capita per day and comparable with a 
rate of 100 gallons per capita per day in 1919. The increase in per 
capita consumption is probably due largely to the severe winter and 
resulting waste of water to prevent freezing of service pipes. 

Now that the war is over and conditions are returning to normal, 
there appears to be no reason why thorough inspections by local 
officials and the unrestricted enforcement of the legislation of 1907, 
for the installation of meters on service pipes, should not reduce 
the per capita consumption of water to 90 gallons per day, which 
w r as sufficient for all purposes in 1915. 

The population, consumption of water and per cent of services 
metered in the Metropolitan Water District as supplied in 1920, and 
for the period from 1890 to 1920, inclusive, are shown graphically by 
the accompanying diagram. 

The average daily consumption of water in each of the municipalities 
in the Metropolitan Water District supplied during 1919 and 1920, as 
measured by the Metropolitan Water Works meters, is as follows : — ■ 













Estimated 
Popula- 


Average Daily Consumption. 




1919. 


1920. 


Increase 














tion, 1920. 




Gallons 




Gallons 


in 






Gallons. 


per 
Capita. 1 


Gallons. 


per 
Capita. 


Gallons. 


Arlington, . . . . 


18,780 


1,085,700 


59 


1,055,600 


56 


30,1002 


Belmont, . 








10,880 


564,000 


54 


591,400 


54 


27,400 


Boston, 










751,810 


89,652,400 


120 


94,297,400 


125 


4,645,000 


Chelsea, 










43,380 


3,158,400 


73 


3,316,400 


76 


158,000 


Everett, 










40,350 


2,886,700 


72 


3,455,200 


86 


568,500 


Lexington 










6,390 


389,200 


62 


424,300 


66 


35,100 


Maiden, 










49,350 


2,682,800 


55 


2,793,300 


57 


110,500 


Medford, 










39,460 


1,688,500 


44 


1,739,700 


44 


51,200 


Melrose, 










18,270 


1,057,100 


59 


1,108,100 


61 


51,000 


Milton, 










9,420 


401,300 


43 


430,900 


46 


29,600 


Nahant, 










1,330 


186,900 


141 


192,600 


145 


5,700 


Quincy, 










48,200 


4,550,100 


97 


4,472,500 


93 


77,6002 


Revere, 










29,120 


1,780,700 


63 


1,975,900 


68 


195,200 


Somerville 










93,530 


6,541,500 


71 


7,177,300 


77 


635,800 


Stoneham, 








7,890 


602,400 


77 


789,600 


100 


187,200 


Swampscott, 








8,150 


570,900 


71 


657,200 


81 


86,300 


Watertown, 








21,530 


2,002,900 


96 


1,911,700. 


89 


91,2002 


Winthrop, . 








15,590 


792,000 


52 


876,400 


56 


84,400 


Distric 


t, 








1,213,430 


120,593,500 


100 


127,265,500 


105 


6,672,000 



1 Th,e populations for 1919 were revised after the census of 1920 became available and consequently 
these per capita figures differ from the figures published in the 1919 report. 2 Decrease. 



POPULATION , CONSUMPTION OF WATER and 

IN THE 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 
AS SUPPLIED IN 1920 

FROM 1890 TO 1920 



PER CENT OE SERVICES METERED 































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1890 



1892 



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1898 



1900 



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1914 



1916 



1918 



1920 



Note: Estimated population and consumption per capita given on diagram published in annual reports 
1916 to 1919 inclusive have been revised and are here shown in accordance with 1920 census.. 



J 
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1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



141 



During 1920 there was an increase in consumption over 1919 in 
all municipalities supplied, with the exception of Arlington, Quincy 
and Watertown, but in the case of Quincy and Watertown there 
was a very large curtailment of the activities undertaken during 
the war. The consumption by districts in 1920 as compared with 
the consumption in 1919 is as follows: — 





Gallons 

per Day, 

1920. 


Increase prom 1919. 




Gallons 
per Day. 


Percent- 
age. 


Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of 
Boston, with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston, . 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts 
of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett, Arlington, 
Charlestown and East Boston, 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy and Watertown, 
the high-service districts of Boston, and portions of Belmont 
and Milton, . . ... . . . 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Revere, Win- 
throp, Swampscott, Nahant and Stoneham, and the high-service 
districts of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and 
East Boston, 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher portions 
of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury, .... 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and the 
higher portions of Arlington and Belmont, .... 


45,571,400 

26,182,900 
44,275,900 

9,601,500 
736,800 
897,000 


3,163,600 

1,505,000 
1,216,500 

708,000 
68,400 
10,500 


7.46 

6.10 
2.83 

7.96 

10.23 

1.18 


Totals, 


127,265,500 


6,672,000 


5.53 



Installation of Meters on Service Pipes. 
Information regarding the installation of meters on service pipes 
by the municipalities supplied with water from the Metropolitan 
Water Works is given in the accompanying table. 



142 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Per 
Cent of 
Services 
metered 
Dec. 31, 

1920. 


* 

OO^MMOiNOOOOOOONOOfflOOlO 


o 


OONfflHOONOOOCfHONOlOOCl 

ootooiNaaoaoNoooh-aoois 


Total 

Services 

equipped 

with 

Meters 

Dec. 31, 

1920. 


00CONINiXIO5ceNOitOO5Nr- iNOi- l i-t ■>*< 

CO p* I>Tit5 ^ jSi, oo CO ^"csT OMOrtMMM 
CO i-l i-l 


no 

o 
•** 

1—1 


Total 
Services 

in Use 

Dec. 31, 

1920. 


OOMOOeOMCONOO^NOS^COrHr-lOO 
HOOlO^«3005l»rtNIN(OrtCSHt-.H 

co'iHN'OtDrHOOO'^N i-7^co i-h cm coco 

O r-1 r-C 


CM 

Ui 

o 

OO 
OO 

1—1 


New 

Services 

equipped 

with 

Meters 

Dec. 31, 

1920.1 


»ON00001N®COO(NC<3«)ONOiOiO 
iHlONCflOOOOON'^NwCKN^OOOOO 
lOrHO)0005tOlN»OOSNOO»iHCONlOai 

1-Tr-TcO^H iHMrH ■"^1-TcN 1-H 


OO 
CM 

°L 

00 

CO 


New 

Services 

installed 

and in 

Use 

Dec. 31, 

1920.1 


ooN«iooo)«toiNO'*«i'50tOffl>oia 

iHlO^«XOHOOOTt(<OT((OONOMM 
Ifli- lt-»OOOSC©i*1000asCO»-lOSCMCOl"-'OOS 


o 

CM 


Number 
of Meters 
required 
to be set 
on Old 
Services 
1908-1920, 
inclusive. 


Ui 1 NO!0<0<MNN 1 OOO^MiOPS I O 

r-1 CO CM t- i-l OO CNI ■* 0>»^i(lN O 

t>. OO OO CM t}1 r-1 CO lO CM 0> t— CO OO CM CO 

COi-HCO CMrt CMi-TlO rt 


OO 
CO 
OO 

OS 

CO 


Meters 

Set 

on Old 

Services 

1908-1920, 

inclusive. 


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Dec. 31, 

1920. 


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1920. 


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Number 

of Meters 

required 

to be set 

on Old 

Services 

Each 

Year. 


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Dec. 31, 

1907. 


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Dec. 31, 

1907. 


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Medford, 

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Milton, 

Nahant, 

Quincy, 

Revere, 

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Stoneham, . 

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1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



143 



During 1920, 2,865 service pipes and 4,778 meters were installed 
in the municipalities supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works 
and at the close of the year 188,052 service pipes and 140,475 meters 
were in use; 74.70 per cent of all the service pipes had been pro- 
vided with meters; in six of the municipalities all of the service 
pipes were equipped with meters and in three other municipalities 
over 99 per cent of the service pipes were equipped with meters. 

Water supplied Outside of Metropolitan Water District. 

During the year 506,263,000 gallons of water were supplied from 
the Metropolitan Water Works for use outside the Metropolitan 
Water District, for which $8,652.90 was charged, as follows: — 



Places supplied. 


Total 
Quantity 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Quantity 

(Gallons 

per Day). 


Number of 

Days on 

which Water 

was 

supplied. 


Amounts 

charged 

for Water 

supplied. 


Westborough State Hospital, . 
Town of Framingham: — 

From Sudbury Aqueduct, .... 

From Filter-gallery at Farm Pond, 
United States Government: — 

Portion of town of Saugus 


72,983,000 

186,500,000 
220,300,000 

15,757,000 
10,723,000 


199,400 

512,362 
601,913 

43,100 
29,300 


366 

364 
366 

366 
366 


$2,189 49 

4,476 00 
421 34 

986 07 
580 00 



Quality of the Water. 

The yearly average results of the chemical analyses, made by 
the Department of Health of the Commonwealth since 1892, and 
of the biological and bacteriological examinations, made in the 
Metropolitan Water Works laboratory, of water from the service 
taps in Boston since 1898 are given in tables in Appendix No. 2. 

During December some complaints were received of a noticeable 
taste and odor in the water, which was caused by growths of Aphan- 
izomenon and Svnura in some of the reservoirs. 



144 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 



Engineering. 

In connection with the maintenance of the works the engineering 
force has made plans, estimates and reports in connection with the 
consideration of various matters, and has made record plans of water 
works lands and structures, and surveys and plans for land pur- 
chases and takings; has tested meters; made photographs, blue 
prints and analyses of coal and oil; calculated yields of watersheds; 
made current meter gagings; kept hydraulic and meteorological 
records; summarized power station and pumping station records; 
cared for the recording pressure gages, and supervised various water 
works operations. 

In the Appendix are tables giving additional information relating 
to the operations of the Metropolitan Water Works for the year 
1920 and the usual water works statistics. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. FOSS, 

Director and Chief Engineer. 
Boston, January 3, 1921. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 145 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF 
ENGINEER OF SEWERAGE DIVISION. 



James A. Bailey, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Dear Sir: — The following report of the operations of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Works for the year ending December 31, 1920, 
is respectfully submitted: — 

Organization. 

The Director and Chief Engineer has charge of the design and 
construction of all new works, and of the maintenance and operation 
of all the works controlled by the Metropolitan District Commission 
for removing sewage from the twenty-six municipalities which com- 
prise the metropolitan sewerage districts. 

The following assistants have been employed during the year : — 

Henry T. Stiff, .... Senior Assistant Engineer, in charge of office 

and drafting room and of construction work. 

Clarence A. Moore, . . . Assistant Engineer, in charge of maintenance 

studies and records, and of construction 
work on the North Metropolitan System. 

George W. Wood, . . . Assistant Engineer, in charge of survey and 

field work in connection with the Wellesley 
extension construction. 

Ralph W. Loud, .... Assistant Engineer, in charge of survey and 

field work in connection with the Reading 
extension construction. 

Thomas L. Whelan, . . . Superintendent, North Metropolitan Sewer- 
age District. 

Arthur F. F. Haskell, . . Superintendent, South Metropolitan Sewer- 
age District. 



146 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

In addition to the above, the number of engineering and other 
assistants employed during the year was 14, which includes 2 
instrumentmen, 4 inspectors, 1 draftsman, 5 rodmen and engineer- 
ing assistants, and 2 stenographers. 

Obituary. 

I wish to record the deaths of three men who have been promi- 
nently connected with the construction and maintenance of the 
metropolitan sewerage system. 

Mr. George F. Greenlaw died of pneumonia on February 2, 1920, 
while yet in service as superintendent of the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage District. Mr. Greenlaw was born in Maine, May 12, 
1850, and received an education fitting him for navigation. For a 
time he was employed as a ship captain in the coasting trade. Later 
he learned the mason's trade and became a practical builder. Fol- 
lowing this he took up engineering and was associated with many 
engineering enterprises before he was employed on these works. His 
service on the metropolitan sewerage works began in 1890, when 
he was employed as inspector of construction work. Later he was 
appointed superintendent of maintenance of the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage District. His services were of great value to the works. 

Mr. Henry J. Wright died of heart failure on May 28, 1920. He 
had been on the retired list since August 6, 1918. Mr. Wright was 
born in England August 6, 1848, and came to this country at an 
early age. He learned in England the trade of machinist, and 
later in this country that of mason. He had been employed in the 
construction of several large engineering works before he came to 
the metropolitan sewerage works. He was employed by the Metro- 
politan Sewerage Commission in 1890 as inspector of construction 
work, and later he was appointed superintendent of maintenance of 
the North Metropolitan Sewerage District. Even after retirement 
he used to visit the works and give information and advice as to 
details with which he was especially familiar. His services were of 
great value to the works. 

Mr. William M. Brown, formerly Chief Engineer of the sewerage 
works, died on May 29, 1920, in Newark, N. J. At the time of 
his death he was Chief Engineer for the Passaic Valley Sewerage 
Commission. Mr. Brown was born in Rhode Island, August 13, 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 147 

1854, and was educated at Brown University. Before his connec- 
tion with the metropolitan sewerage works he had been employed 
in several engineering positions. He was appointed by the Metro- 
politan Sewerage Commission in 1890 to the position of assistant 
engineer in charge of construction work. In 1895 Mr. Brown was 
made Chief Engineer of the Metropolitan Sewerage System, and re- 
mained in that capacity until he resigned to accept a position as 
Chief Engineer for the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission on 
February 21, 1912. During Mr. Brown's term as Chief Engineer 
of Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the maintenance of the system 
was organized and the works put into operation. Under his en- 
gineering supervision the Neponset valley sewer and the high-level 
sewer and many extensions of the metropolitan sewerage system 
were completed. His service of twenty-two years in the building 
and operation of the metropolitan sewerage system displayed a large 
constructive ability and an intimate knowledge of the details of 
maintenance. Faithful devotion and prompt execution and ac- 
complishment characterized the performance of all his duties. 



148 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 

Areas and Populations. 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the 
metropolitan sewerage districts. 

The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, 
are based on the census of 1920. 



Table showing Ultimate Contributing Areas and Present Estimated Populations 
within the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, as of December 81, 1920. 



City or Town. 


Area ( Square 
Miles). 


Estimated 
Population. 




Arlington, .......... 


5.20 


19,000 




Belmont, 


















4.66 


11,130 




Boston (portions of), 


















3.45 


95,420 




Cambridge, 


















6.11 


110,500 




Chelsea, 


















2.24 


43,780 


c 


Everett, 


















3.34 


40,820 


«6 


Lexington, * 


















5.11 


4,500 


O 
Pi +3 


Maiden, 


















5.07 


49,850 


O o 


Medford, 


















8.35 


40,300 




Melrose, 


















3.73 


18,410 


Reading, 


















9.82 


7,530 


o 


Revere, 


















5.86 


29,730 


Somerville, . 


















3.96 


94,420 




Stoneham, . 


















5.50 


7,940 




Wakefield, . 


















7.65 


13,210 




Winchester, 


















5.95 


10,610 




Winthrop, . 


















1.61 


15,860 




^Woburn, 


















12.71 


16,680 




















mn °° 


fi°o fion 




1UU.OZ 


— ozy,Qyu 




Boston (portions of), 


















24.96 


266,220 


d 

c8 


Brookline, . 


















6.81 


38,390 


+5 


Dedham, J . 




















9.40 


10,870 


Bi-J 

s.s 


Milton, 




















12.59 


9,490 


.ft- . 

2 « 


Newton, 




















16.88 


46,520 


2s 

3 


Quincy, 




















12.56 


48,830 


Waltham, 




















13.63 


31,260 


^ 


Watertown, . 
Wellesley, . 




















4.04 
.9.89 


21,660 
6,380 




1 10 7fi 


470 fi°0 




llu . ( D 


^1 Ut\)6\J 




Totals, 




















211.08 


1,109,310 



1 Part of town. 



1921.- 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



149 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS. 

Seweks Purchased and Constructed and their Connections. 

During the year there have been built 2.652 miles of metropolitan 
sewers within the sewerage districts, so that there are now 117.572 
miles of metropolitan sewers. Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, 
with the Quincy pumping station, have been purchased from cities 
and towns of the districts. The remaining 107.930 miles of sewers 
and other works have been constructed by the metropolitan boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the 
following tables, together with other data referring to the public and 
special connections with the systems : — 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections. 







i 


i i 


Special Connections. 








S $o 










3 


g|s 




,2 c 


City ok Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


.5 


<5Q- 

-1— 1 

.-. COM 


Character or Location of 








+» 


3.2 & 


Connection. 


S a 






G 


3+3 .Q 




£0 






l-l 


Ph 




fe 


Boston : — 












Deer Island, 


4'0"to9'0", 


1.653 


4 

( 


Shoe factory, .... 


1 


East Boston, 


9'0"tol'0", 


5.467 


25] 
[ 


Middlebrook Wool-combing 
Co., 


1 


Charlestown, 


6'7"X7'5"to l'O", . 


3.292 


K 


Navy Yard, .... 

Private building, . 

Club House, ... 


9 
1 
1 


Winthrop, 


9'0", 


2.864 


13- 


Fire department station, 


1 










Private building, . 


1 








Bakery, ..... 


1 










Rendering works. . 


1 










Metropolitan Water Works 




Chelsea, . 


8'4"X9'2"to 15", . 


5.230 


13' 


blow-off, .... 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
offs, . . 

Naval Hospital, 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 

Cameron Appliance Co. , . 

Shultz-Goodwin Co., 


1 

2 
1 

1 
1 

1 


Everett, . 


8'2"X8'10"to4'8"X5' 1", 


2.925 


8' 

I 


Andrews- Wasgatt Co., 
National Metallic Bed Co., . 
Linoide Co., .... 

Factory, 

New England Structural Co., 


1 
1 
1 
2 
1 


Lexington, 


— — 


— 


1 

( 


Metropolitan Water Works 


- 


Maiden, . 


4'6"X4' 10" to l'O", . 


5.844 1 


34 1 


blow-off, .... 
Private buildings, . 


1 
190 s 



1 Includes 1.84 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

2 Mostly buildings connected with sewers formerly belonging to city of Maiden but later purchased by 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with chapter 215 of the Acts of 1898 and by the 
Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board in accordance with chapter 512 of the Acts of 1911 and made parts 
of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



150 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded. 

Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 

— Concluded. 







CO 


■ i 

CD S . 


Special Connections. 








G £o 










S 


g|3 




.So 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 




5&~ 

q CO CO 


Character or Location of 


.2 

u +3 
0> c8 






a 


3.2 S 


Connection. 


S o. 






9*3,0 




£o 






h5 


PU, 




£ 








, 


Private buildings, . 


116 2 


Melrose, . 


4' 6"X4' 10" to 10", . 


6.099 1 


39 

J 


Factory, 

Railroad station, 

Park Department bath-house, 

Harvard dormitories, 

Slaughterhouse, 




Cambridge, . 


5'2"X5'9"to 1'3", . 


7.209 




City Hospital, 

Street railway machine shop, 










Private building, . 




% 






1 


Factory building, . 










Tannery, .... 












Slaughterhouses (3), 












Carhouse, .... 












Somerville Water Works blow- 




Somerville, 


6'5"X7'2"to 10", . 


3.577 


IS, 


off, 

Street railway power house, . 

Stable, 

Rendering works, . . 
Railroad scale pit, . 
Private building, . 
Armory building, . 




Medford, 


4'8"X5'l"to 10", . 


5.713 


25 | 


Priyate buildings, . 

Stable, 

Police substation, . 
Tanneries, .... 
Private buildings, . 
Gelatine factory, 
Watch-hand factory, 


6 
10 


Winchester, . 


4' 6" to 1' 3", . 


9.470 


27- 


Stable, 

Railroad station, 

Felt works, .... 

Town Hall 

Bay State Saw & Tool Co., . 
Whitney Machine Co., . 




Stoneham, 
Woburn, 


1' 8" to 10", 

1' 10"X2'4"to 1'3", . 


2.333 
0.713 


4 

3 ( 


Glue factory, .... 
Private buildings, . 


3 
162* 


Arlington, 


1' 6" to 10", 


3.520 3 


- 

{ 


Railroad station, . 
Car-house, .... 
Post office, .... 


1 
3 
1 


Belmont, 6 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


Wakefield, 


3'0"to 2'0"X2'3", . 


0.577 


1 


- 


- 


Revere, . 


4' 0" to 15", 


0.136 


3 


- - 


- 


Reading, 




0.055 


- 




- 




66. 677 « 


318 


565 



1 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 

2 Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the city of Melrose but later purchased 
by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with chapter 414 of the Acts of 1896 and with a 
sewer extension built in accordance with chapter 436 of the Acts of 1897 by the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commission as an outlet for part of the town of Stoneham and made parts of the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage System. 

3 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

< Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the town of Arlington but later pur- 
chased by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with chapter 520 of the Acts of 1897 and 
made a part of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

s The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Belmont. 

8 Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic valley sewer in Medford and Winchester, running parallel with the 
metropolitan sewer. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



151 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections. 







03 

.2 


i i 

a) 2 


Special Connections. 








a a>c 










3 


! Con: 
3, Dec 
SI. 192 




.5 c 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


,j3 


Character or Location of 








bO 


3.2 « 


Connection. 


C ft 







© 


3-S.a 




►2° 






A 


* 




z 










Tufts Medical School, . 


1 










Private house, 


1 


Boston: — 
Back Bay, . 


6' 6" to 3' 9", . 


1.500 1 


16 < 


Administration Building, 

Boston Park Department, . 

Simmons College Buildings, . 


1 
1 










Art Museum, .... 


2 


Brighton, 


5'9"X6'0"to 12", . 


6.010 2 


15 


Abattoir, .... 
Chocolate works, . 
Machine shop, 


3 
2 
1 


Dorchester, 


3'X4'to2'6"X2'7", . 


2.870 3 


13. 


Paper Mill, .... 
Private buildings, . 
Edison Electric Company Sta- 
tion, ..... 
Mattapan Paper Mills, . 


1 
3 

1 

1 


Hyde Park, . 


10'7"Xll'7"to4'0"X4'l", 


4.527 


18 


Private buildings, . 
Fairview Cemetery Buildings, 


2 
1 


Roxbury, . 


6'6"X7'to4'0", 


1.430 




Caledonia Grove buildings, . 


1 


West Roxbury, . 


9'3"X10'2"to 12", . 


7-643 


16 < 


Parental School, 

Lutheran Evangelical Church, 

Private buildings, . 


1 
1 

4 


Brookline, 


6'6"X7'0"to8", 


2. 540* 


12 


Private buildings, . 


2 


Dedham, 


4'X4' l"to2'9"X3', . 


4.622 


7 


Dedham Carpet Mills, . 


1 


Hull, s . 


60" pipe, .... 


0.750 


- 


- - 


- 


Milton, . 


ll'X12'to8", 


3.600 


23 


Private buildings, . 


2 


Newton, 


4'2"X4'9"to 1'3", . 


2.911 


8 


Private houses, 
Metropolitan Water Works 


7 


Quincy, . 


ll'3"X12'6"to24"pipe, . 


6.845 


15 


blow-off, .... 
Squantum schoolhouse, 


1 
1 


Walt ham, 


3'6"X4'0",. 


0.001 


1 


Factories, .... 


2 


Water town, 


4'2"X4'9"to 12", . 


0.7506 


6 


Stanley Motor Carriage Co., . 
Knights of Pythias building, 


1 
1 


Need ham, 5 


2'0"X2'3"to2'3"X2'6", . 


4.896 


- 


- - 


- 


Wellesley, 7 




- 


- 


- 


- 




50.895 


150 




46 



1 Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes .446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also .026 
of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

3 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

4 Includes .158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 

5 Hull and Needham are not parts of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

6 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

7 The metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Wellesley. 



Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections 
and other data for the metropolitan sewerage districts appears in 
the following table : — 



152 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



North Metropolitan Sewerage District. 



Area 
(Square 
Miles). 



100.32 



Estimated 

Total 
Population. 



629,690 



Miles of 
Local Sewer 
connected. 



785.26 



Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 



574,850 



Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(Per Cent). 



91.3 



Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers. 



Public. 



318 



Special. 



565 



South Metropolitan Sewerage District. 


110.76 


479,620 


674.88 363,200 


75.7 


150 


46 


Both Metropolitan Sewerage Districts. 


211.08 


1,109,310 


1,460.14 


938,050 


84.6 


468 


611 



Of the estimated gross population of 1,109,310 on December 31, 
1920, 938,050, representing 84.6 per cent, were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 1,460.14 miles of local sewers owned by the individual cities and 
towns of the districts. 

These sewers are connected with the metropolitan systems by 468 
public and 611 special connections. During the current year there 
has been an increase of 14.06 miles of local sewers connected with 
the metropolitan systems, and 2 public and 8 special connections 
have been added. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Reading Extension. 
For the disposal of sewage from the town of Reading a covered 
concrete reservoir has been constructed near the corner of Summer 
Avenue and Elm Street in Reading having a capacity of about 
250,000 gallons. A pumping station will be built at this point at 
which sewage will be raised about 65 feet through a cast-iron force 
main to a point where it will flow by gravity into the metropolitan 
sewers. These are all included in Section 76. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 153 



Part of Section 76, Reading Extension. — Inlet Sewer, Res- 
ervoir, Pump Well, Pumping Station Foundations and 
Cast-iron Force Main. 
This work extends from a point in Hopkins Street, Wakefield, 
northerly through lands of Herbert M. Hopkins and George A. 
Forbes, to a point in Summer Avenue, Wakefield. A part of these 
structures is in the town of Reading. 

A contract for the construction of this work was entered into by 
the Commission, some particulars of which are as follows: — 

Date of contract No. 1 (Sewerage Division), .... February 11, 1920. 

Name of contractor, Bruno & Petitti. 

Concrete inlet sewer : — 

Dimensions, 3-feet diameter. 

Length, . 100 feet. 

Concrete reservoir : — 

Length of reservoir, 100 feet. 

Height of reservoir, .18 feet. 

Width of reservoir, 20 feet. 

Average depth of excavation, 38 feet. 

Pumping station foundations : — 

Dimensions, 27 by 42 feet. 

Depth of excavation for pump well, 42 feet. 

Cast-iron force main : — 

Diameter, 16 inches. 

Length, 1,370 feet. 

Assistant engineer in charge of construction, . . . Ralph W. Loud. 

The inlet sewer, reservoir and pump well were constructed largely in 
rock, the rock excavation ranging in depth from 18 to 36 feet. 
A small amount of ground water was encountered. A concrete con- 
duit was constructed along the pumping station site and across the 
reservoir location to carry the flow of a brook. All work is com- 
pleted excepting minor repairs over the surface. 

Section 75. — Reading Extension. 

This section extends in Stoneham and Wakefield from a point in 
land of Cornelius J. Sweeney, northerly through said land of 
Sweeney, and lands of Mary A. Scally, Elizabeth L. McGrady, 
Margaret McLaughlin, Annie E. Greene, Ellen Magner, Richard C. 
Christie, Carl and Emilia Christiansen, Ida A. Nilsson, Bridget 



154 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Mary McCarty and John B. Tidd, crossing Main Street, thence 
through lands of Walter Steele and Betty K. Fair, passing through 
a portion of North Street, thence through lands of Emma C. and 
Ruth G. Prescott, Bear Hill Associates, Inc., Joseph E. Hopkins, 
and Herbert M. Hopkins to a point in Hopkins Street, Wakefield. 
A contract for the construction of this work was entered into by 
the Commission, some particulars of which are as follows: — 

Date of contract No. 4 (Sewerage Division), . . . September 29, 1920. 

Name of contractor, Antony Cefalo. 

Length of section, 5,486 feet. 

Average depth of excavation, 7 feet. 

Dimensions of pipe sewer, 15, 18 and 20 inches. 

Assistant engineer in charge of construction, . . . Ralph W. Loud. 

This work has been constructed in shallow trenches and with 
very little difficulty. Rock was encountered from Station 24+65 
to Station 25+96, and from Station 53+30 to Station 54+86. 
From Station to Station 1+50 a foundation of bowlder concrete 
was provided. That part of the sewer which was laid through the 
limits of the ice pond extending from Station to Station 3+72 
was surrounded by concrete. The 15, 18 and 20 inch pipe used on 
this section is of double strength Buckeye Akron pipe. At the cross- 
ing of a drainage brook near Station 51+34, 16-inch cast-iron pipes 
were used. The work on this section is practically completed. 

The funds appropriated under chapter 159 of the General Acts of 
1916 have been exhausted. A pumping station must be constructed 
and pumps installed therein. It has been planned that these shall 
be operated by electricity purchased from the town of Reading. 
If the appropriation asked for is received early in the season, this 
line can be put into operation by September 1, 1921. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Wellesley Extension. 

At the beginning of this year there remained to be constructed a 
part of Section 99, all of Section 100 and all of Section 101. A 
contract was let, as noted in last year's report, for the construction 
of the remainder of Section 99. This contract was terminated by 
an arrangement between the Commission and the contractor, as the 
latter did not have the necessary funds for completing the work. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



155 



Part of Section 99, Trench and River Crossing. — Station 
18+75 to Station 33+00. Wellesley Extension. 
A new contract was entered into for the completion of this sec- 
tion, some particulars of which are as follows : — 



Date of contract No. 3 (Sewerage Division), 
Name of contractor, . 
Length of section, 
Average depth of cut in trench, 
Dimensions of concrete sewer, . 
Cast-iron pipe river crossing, . 
Assistant engineer in charge of construction 
work, 



May 29, 1920. 

Rendle-Stoddard Company. 

1,425 feet. 

11 feet. 

33 by 36 inches. 

30 inches. 

George W. Wood. 



Work was begun under this contract on May 29, 1920. At the 
end of the year the work had been practically completed. There 
remain some backfilling and clearing up of right of way. In this 
section there is a river crossing which was completed by means of 
30-inch cast-iron pipe laid on a pile foundation. The pipe joints 
were calked with lead. No serious difficulty was encountered in 
the construction of this work, although a considerable amount of 
ground water was encountered. 

Section 100. Wellesley Extension. 

This section extends in Dedham from a point in land of Stephen 
M. Weld, westerly through land of said Weld and land of Frederick 
P. Royce, et at., Trustees, thence through other land of said Weld 
and other land of said Trustees to a point in Common Street near 
Charles River. A contract for the completion of this work was 
entered into by the Commission, some particulars of which are 
as follows : — 



Date of contract No. 2 (Sewerage Division), .... May 19, 1920. 

Name of contractor, Bruno & Petitti. 

Length of section, 3,921 feet. 

Average depth of sewer in trench, 13 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, . 33 by 36 inches. 

Assistant engineer in charge of construction, .... George W. Wood. 



156 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



At the end of the year there remained 400 feet to be completed 
on this section. Rock was encountered from Station 22+85 to 
Station 24 + 75, and from Station 30 + 15 to Station 36+40. It is 
expected that this work will be completed in the early spring. A 
considerable amount of ground water has been encountered. 

Section 101. Wellesley Extension. 
This section extends from Common Street in Dedham along the 
southerly side of Charles River through private lands, and crosses 
Dedham Avenue, private land and Charles River to a point in the 
town of Needham. The total length is 3,840 feet. A contract for 
the construction of this section was entered into by the Metropolitan 
Water and Sewerage Board, some particulars of which are as fol- 
lows : — 



Date of contract No. 145 (Sewerage Works), 

Name of contractor, . 

Length of section, 

Average depth of sewer in trench, 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, . 

Dimensions of cast-iron siphon, 

Assistant engineer in charge of construction, 



September 17, 1919. 

Rendle-Stoddard Company. 

3,840 feet. 

8 feet. 

33 by 36 inches. 

16 inches. 

George W. Wood. 



By permission of the Board the contractor was allowed to com- 
plete other work for the Board before starting on this section. This 
was done because of the scarcity of labor. Work was started on 
this section under the above contract on January 14, 1920. At 
the end of the year there had been completed 2,425 feet. This 
section has been constructed in a shallow trench near the river. 

During the early part of the season considerable delay in the con- 
struction of these sections was occasioned by scarcity of labor, also 
by reason of the high water of the Charles River, owing to the ab- 
normal rainfall, and also by the difficulty which the contractors 
found in getting cement and other material. 

To complete the Wellesley extension there remains to be built 
1,815 feet of sewer, including a river crossing near Dedham Avenue. 
Work will probably be completed early in the summer of 1921. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 157 

MAINTENANCE. 

SCOPE OF WORK AND FORCE EMPLOYED. 

The maintenance of the metropolitan sewerage system includes 
the operation of 7 pumping stations, the Nut Island screen-house, 
and 117.572 miles of metropolitan sewers receiving the discharge 
from 1,460.14 miles of town and city sewers at 468 points, together 
with the care and study of inverted siphons under streams and in 
the harbor. 

The permanent maintenance force at present includes 160 men, 
of whom 99 are employed on the North System and 61 on the South 
System. These are subdivided as follows: North Metropolitan 
System, 64 engineers and other employees in the pumping stations, 
and 35 men, including foremen, on maintenance, care of sewer lines, 
buildings and grounds; South Metropolitan System, 36 engineers 
and other employees in the pumping stations, and 25 men, including 
foremen, on maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation 
of the pumping stations, has consisted of routine work of cleaning 
and inspecting sewers and siphons, caring for tide gates, regulators 
and overflows, measuring flow in sewers, inspection of connections 
with the metropolitan sewers, and the care of pumping stations and 
other buildings and grounds. 

In addition to these regular duties other work has been done by 
the maintenance employees of this department as follows : — 

Deer Island Pumping Station. 

During the early spring the grass slopes back of the coal house 
slipped down, and considerable work was necessary in replacing and 
reseeding. A portion of the work was replaced by a concrete face. 

A 2-inch lead-lined iron pipe has been laid from the institution 
reservoir at the top of the hill to connect with the feed-water piping 
of the pumping station. This was done so as to insure a supply for 
the boilers in case of accident to the institution piping on Deer 
Island, through which the ordinary supply at the station is obtained. 

Steam heat and electric lights were installed in the storehouse and 
stable in order to lessen fire hazard. 

A new piston was furnished for the low-pressure cylinder of en- 
gine No. 1. The impeller wheel on engine No. 3 had become 



158 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

loosened by corrosion. This was reset and a 10-inch brass sleeve 
was put on the shaft and new bearings were installed. Two new 
condenser pump cylinders were made and put in place for this 
pumping engine. 

Charlestown Pumping Station. 

At this station a basement gallery has been extended the length 
of the building on the west side. This enables the pipes, which 
formerly had been located in a shallow trench and at places buried 
in earth or concrete, to be exposed to view, and to be easily reached 
in case of repair work. 

The moving of the street about 30 feet to the westward during 
the reconstruction of the Maiden bridge over the Mystic River left 
a strip of land between it and the station. This has been improved 
by building through it a driveway with concrete curb and gutters, 
and the loaming and seeding of the remainder. 

A brick house built over the shaft in the Charlestown playground 
was originally covered with a red-tile roof. This roof was exposed 
to the assaults of vandals, and it was impossible to keep it in repair. 
The police were appealed to, but they said that inasmuch as it was 
a public playground it was extremely difficult for them to guard 
it. A concrete roof was substituted for the tile roof. 

Sewer Line Repairs. 

During the period of high flow occasioned by the melting of the 
snows in March the pipe sewer at Tremont Street, Melrose, over- 
flowed through one of its manholes. A 16-inch cast-iron pipe has 
been laid from this manhole to another metropolitan sewer located 
in the same street. This connection is made at Station 5+81 of 
Section 50. 

The head houses at the river crossing on the Revere extension had 
become damaged by exposure to storms. These were repaired by 
relaying the brickwork and surrounding it with reinforced concrete. 

Repairs were made on the tide gates and masonry walls at the 
Belle Isle Inlet overflow. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT - No. 48. 159 



Ward Street Pumping Station. 

A Lincoln electric welding machine and a Waterhouse acetylene 
heating and welding outfit were installed at this station to be used 
in connection with repair work. Much repair work that formerly 
had been sent out to be done is now accomplished at this station. 

Nut Island Screen-house and Yard. 

At this station considerable machinist work has been done for 
other portions of the line. This station is equipped with a lathe, 
grinding machinery, a shaper and an upright drill. A large amount 
of brass foundry work is done here averaging lj tons per year of 
finished castings. These are made for all parts of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works. 

A new landing float 32 feet long and 8 feet wide was constructed 
for use at the Nut Island wharf. 

The concrete fence on the westerly side of the bar leading to Nut 
Island has been completed during the year. A new fence was built 
at the sides of Pawsey Road (so called), which extends along and 
across Section 48, high-level sewer. 

Repairs were made on the fence at Nut Island stockyard. 

During a violent storm in the latter part of November the 43- 
foot naphtha towboat broke from its moorings and was driven on 
to the riprap slopes of Nut Island bar. The keel and boarding were 
much damaged, also the rudder and propeller. Repairs have been 
made. 

Quincy Pumping Station. 

The pumping engines at this station were repainted. 

Elbridge M. Walker, assistant operating engineer at this station, 
was retired at his request because of physical disability on Septem- 
ber 30, 1920. 

A new steam valve was made and installed in engine No. 3 for 
the high-pressure cylinder. 

Settlements occurred in the grounds surrounding this station, 
making it necessary to regrade and reseed considerable portions of 
the same. 



160 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 



Government Use of Old 24-inch Quincy Force Main. 
The sewerage connection of the shipbuilding plant at Squantum, 
Quincy, with the 24-inch cast-iron force main in Squantum Street, 
has been in use during the year. Since June 1, 1920, this plant has 
been operated as a part of the Charlestown Navy Yard, and is 
wholly under government control. The sewage discharged through 
the force main has averaged about 75,000 gallons per 24 hours. 
This sewage is discharged through the Boston main drainage out- 
fall works at Moon Island. 

Gasolene in Public Sewers. 

The efforts to improve the condition of the metropolitan sewers 
in regard to dangers resulting from the introduction of gasolene into 
the same have been continued throughout the year and have been 
successful. 

An inspector has been employed in this Department whose duty 
it is to visit existing garages and see that the separators are kept 
in proper condition; also to enforce the regulation concerning the 
installation of such separators at all newly constructed garages. 

The abnormally large rainfall of 1920 caused the metropolitan 
sewers to be surcharged at some points. This was particularly so in 
Cambridge. The condition resulted in a collection of oil and gaso- 
lene at the manholes where the water surface rose above the sewer 
arches. This material was analyzed by the chemist of the State 
Department of Health and was found to contain fully 75 per cent 
of gasolene. About 70 barrels of the mixture were removed from 
the sewers and disposed of otherwise. Notice was sent to the De- 
partment of Public Safety. 

During the year 154 new garages and other establishments using 
gasolene have been connected with the local sewer systems which 
discharge into the metropolitan sewers. 

The following tables show the particulars in regard to establish- 
ments known to be using gasolene and which are connected with 
the public sewerage systems of the different municipalities in the 
metropolitan sewerage districts : — 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



161 



Nobth Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

Table showing Number of Places where Gasolene is used connected with Public 
Sewers, and Progress of Work of installing Separators to December 31, 1920. 



City or Town. 


Number of 

Places 

connected 

with Sewer. 


Number of 
Places 

originally 
having 

Acceptable 

Separators. 


Number of 

Places 

where 

Changes 

have been 
made. 


Number of 

New 

Garages 

built, 1920. 


Remarks. 


Arlington, .... 


6 


- 


3 


- 


- 


Belmont, .... 


4 


- 


3 


- 


- 


Boston: — 












Charlestown district, 


26 


- 


19 


1 


- 


East Boston district, 


29 


- 


17 


3 


- 


Cambridge, .... 


145 


- 


108 


36 


- 


Chelsea, 








29 


- 


13 


5 


- 


Everett, 








24 


- 


14 


8 


- 


Lexington, 








2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


Maiden, 








26 


-■ 


20 


3 


- 


Medford, 








16 


- 


13 


- 


- 


Melrose, . 








7 


- 


5 


- 


- 


Revere, 








13 


- 


3 


1 


- 


Somerville, 








87 


8 


32 


35 


- 


Stone ham, 








7 


- 


6 


1 


- 


Wakefield, 








6 


- 


6 


.- 


- 


Winchester, 








14 


- 


14 


- 


- 


Winthrop, 








4 


- 


4 


- ' 


- 


Woburn, 








4 


- 


3 


1 


- 


Reading, 








- 


- 


- 


- 


Not yet connected 
with metropolitan 


Totals, 






449 


8 


283 


95 


sewer. 



162 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

Table shotting Number of Places where Gasolene is used connected with Public 
Sewers, and Progress of Work of installing Separators to December 31, 1920. 



City or Town. 


Number of 

Places 

connected 

with Sewer. 


Number of 
Places 

originally 
having 

Acceptable 

Separators. 


Number of 

Places 

where 

Changes 

have been 
made. 


Number of 
New- 
Garages 
built, 1920. 


Remarks. 


Boston : — 












Hyde Park district, 


15 


- 


8 


- 


- 


West Roxbury district, 


36 


10 


16 


5 


- 


Back Bay district, 


60 


22 


26 


1 


- 


Brighton district, 


75 


22 


28 


14 


- 


Dorchester district, . 


46 


20 


11 


5 


- 


Jamaica Plain district, 


3 


- 


- 


3 


- 


Mattapan district, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Brookline, .... 


96 


9 


54 


19 


- 


Dedham, 




3 


3 


- 


- 


- 


Milton, . 




1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


Newton, 




52 


18 


23 


6 


- 


Quincy, 




21 


- 


15 


4 


- 


Walt ham, 




12 


5 


1 


2 


- 


Watertown, 




17 


3 


13 


- 


- 


Wellesley, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


Not yet connected 
with metropolitan 












sewer. 


Totals, 




437 


113 


195 


59 





Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works in 
Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 

Four men and a foreman have been employed during a part of 
the year flushing and cleaning the metropolitan sewers through 
the tannery districts in Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 

All the tanneries and glue works of the district now have settling 
tanks of substantial size. This method of treatment has very greatly 
reduced the amount of sludge material entering the metropolitan 
sewers. 

The following table gives details of settling tanks introduced to 
date, showing the operations of same, with the amount of sludge 
collected and removed: — 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



163 



Table of Semi-fluid Sludge removed from Settling Basins at the Tanneries, Gelatine 
and Glue Works in Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham, Year ending December 
31, 1920. 



Location of Basin. 


Basin in Oper- 
ation. 


Inside 
Measure- 
ment 
of Basin 

(Feet). 


T3 

C 
03 

02 

■ B . 
S3 


Average Quantity Semi- 
fluid Sludge removed 
during Year (Cubic 
Yards). 


Total Quantity Semi-fluid 
Sludge removed during 
Year (Cubic Yards). 


Beggs & Cobb Company, rotary screen 


Dec. 


12, 1917 


_ 




_ 


_ 


276.00 


process. 1 
Beggs & Cobb Company, wooden settling 

basin. 
Beggs & Cobb Company, outlet intercept- 


Aug. 


12, 1919 


6. OX 4.0 




51 


- 


776.00 


July 


16, 1919 


12. OX 8.0 




2 


11.00 


22.00 


American Hide and Leather Company, 

Factory D. 
Dorington Leather Company, . . 


Nov. 
Dec. 


15, 1910 
10, 1910 


48.0X23.1 
47.2X23.0 




4 
3 


139.50 
106.84 


558.00 
320.52 


E. Cummings Leather Company, 


Nov. 


1, 1910 


45.9X22.6 




2 


97.60 


195.20 


W. P. Fox & Sons, . . . '. 


July 


12, 1910 


47.8X22.6 




10 


270.40 


2,740.00 


Thayer & Foss, 


Sept. 


15, 1910 


48.1X23.1 




13 


209.80 


2.727.00 


Van Tassell Leather Company, 2 


May 


1, 1911 


10.2X14.5 




- 


- 


- 


Van Tassell Leather Company, 


May 


1, 1911 


43.8X19.5 




5 


102.00 


510.00 


Van Tassell Leather Company, 2 


Dec. 


26, 1919 


6. OX 4.0 




- 


- 


- 


American Glue Company, 


Oct. 


1, 1910 


47.1X23.0 




10 


136.36 


1,363.60 


J. 0. Whitten Company, 1 .... 




1902 


35.5X24.7 




26 


58.74 


1,527.24 


J. 0. Whitten Company, i .... 




L902 


67.2X12.0 




26 


8.50 


221.00 


Morris Kaplan, 2 ...... 


Jan. 


9, 1911 


46.8X22.9 




- 


- 


- 


Morris Kaplan, . 


Jan. 


9, 1911 


4. OX 4.0 




52 


1.00 


52.00 


S. C. Parker & Son, 2 , 3, . 


Aug. 


1, 1910 


48.3X23.0 




- 


- 


- 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 1 , 2 


Jan. 


15, 1910 


47.0X23.0 




- 


- 


- 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 2, 2 . 


May 


9, 1910 


47.0X23.0 




- 




- 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 3, 2 . 


Oct. 


19, 1911 


51.0X25.0 




- 


- 


- 


Atlantic Gelatine Company, * 


Mar. 


12, 1920 


30-ft. di- 
ameter. 




- 


- 


100.00 


Total, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11,388.56 



1 Daily, continuous. 



2 Not used in 1920. 



3 Burned in December, 1920. 



164 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 





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1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



167 



PUMPING STATIONS. 

Capacities and Results. 

The following table shows the comparison of the growth in the 
amount of sewage handled and the total cost of the operation of the 
different stations in 1920 with the same items of 1919 and of 1914 
when prices had not been affected by the war : — 



Pumping Station. 



Deer Island, 
East Boston, 
Charlestown, 
Alewife Brook, 
Quincy, . 
Ward Street, 



Sewage pumped in 1920 
increased over that of — 



1919. 



Per Cent. 
5 



1914. 



Per Cent. 

27 

27 
27 
48 
49 
29 



Cost of Operation in 1920 
increased over that of — 



1919. 



Per Cent. 
32 

31 

20 

23 

59 

46 



1914. 



Per Cent. 
121 

101 

76 

62 
125 
112 



Average Daily Volume of Sewage lifted at Each of the Six Principal Metropolitan 
Sewerage Pumping Stations and at the Quincy (Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting 
Station during the Year, as compared with the Corresponding Volumes for the 
Previous Year. 





Average Daily Pumpage. 


Pumping Station. 


Jan. 1, 1920, to 
Dec. 31, 1920. 


Jan. 1, 1919, to 
Dec. 31, 1919. 


Increase during the 
Year. 


Deer Island, 


Gallons. 
74,000,000 


Gallons. 
70,300,000 


Gallons. 
3,700,000 


Per Cent. 
5.3 


East Boston, 


72,000,000 


68,300,000 


3,700,000 


5.4 


Charlestown, 


41,400,000 


38,400,000 


3,000,000 


7.8 


Alewife Brook 


5,156,000 


4,888,000 


268,000 


5.5 


Quincy, 


5,918,000 


5,693,000 


225,000 


4.0 


Ward Street (actual gallons pumped), 


34,261,000 


33,759,000 


502,000 


1.5 


Quincy (Hough's Neck) sewage lifting sta- 
tion. 


225,600 


205,500 


20,100 


9.8 



1G8 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



North Metropolitan System. 

Deer Island Pumping Station. 
At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with im- 
peller wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion en- 
gines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 53,900,000 foot pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 74,000,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 4 oilers, 3 screen men, 

1 relief screen man and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: bituminous, costing from $8.50 to $17.50 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average Duty 
(Foot Pounds 

per 100 
Pounds Coal). 


1920 

January, . 




2,060,300,000 


66,500,000 


54,200,000 


83,900,000 


9.09 


55,000,000 


February, 






2,097,300,000 


72,300,000 


57,000,000 


98,300,000 


9.48 


53,000,000 


March, 






3,668,600,000 


118,300,000 


62,500,000 


151,200,000 


11.88 


55,900,000 


April, 






3,058,400,000 


101,900,000 


68,200,000 


144,600,000 


11.81 


58,200,000 


May, 






2,678,500,000 


86,400,000 


58,300,000 


151,400,000 


11.18 


56,500,000 


June, 






2,773,500,000 


92,500,000 


74,800,000 


149,800,000 


11.21 


59,000,000 


July, 






2,088,100,000 


67,400,000 


51,700,000 


89,100,000 


10.56 


66,700,000 


August, . 






1,605,000,000 


51,800,000 


42,200,000 


67,200,000 


10.82 


51,900,000 


September, 






1,616,000,000 


53,900,000 


34,500,000 


88,200,000 


10.30 


43,600,000 


October, . 






1,519,200,000 


49,000,000 


39,300,000 


72,100,000 


11.17 


53,800,000 


November, 






1,886,700,000 


62,900,000 


42,600,000 


139,400,000 


11.09 


52,700,000 


December, 






2,034,000,000 


65,600,000 


51,400,000 


100,000,000 


11.24 


40,700,000 


Total, 


27,085,600,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


74,000,000 


53,100,000 


111,300,000 


10.82 


53,900,000 



1921.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



169 



Average Cost per Million Foot Gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island Station, 

Volume (27,085.6 Million Gallons) X Lift (10.82 Feet) = 293,066.2 Million Foot Gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 

Million Foot 

Gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal 

Oil, 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, . . . . 



$27,173 24 

34,335 00 

1,003 69 

161 46 

1,517 16 

297 21 

2,394 62 



566,882 38 
$5,086 52 



$0.09272 
0.11716 
0.00342 
0.00055 
0.00518 
0.00101 
0.00817 



1.22821 



East Boston Pumping Station. 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
peller wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines 
of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 



Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 70,800,000 foot pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 72,000,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 2 relief engineers, 3 firemen, 1 relief fireman, 4 

oilers, 3 screen men, 1 relief screen man, 3 helpers and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: bituminous costing from $8.25 to $17.50 per gross ton. 



170 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet). 


Average Duty 
(Foot Pounds 

per 100 
Pounds Coal). 


1920 

January, . 




1,998,300,000 


64,500,000 


52,200,000 


81,900,000 


12.81 


74,000,000 


February, 






2,039,300,000 


70,300,000 


55,000,000 


96,300,000 


12.89 


68,800,000 


March, 






3,606,600,000 


116,300,000 


60,500,000 


149,200,000 


14.24 


72,900,000 


April, 






2,998,400,000 


99,900,000 


66,200,000 


142,600,000 


13.95 


80,000,000 


May, 






2,616,500,000 


84,400,000 


56,300,000 


149,400,000 


13.35 


72,800,000 


June, 






2,713,500,000 


90,500,000 


72,800,000 


147,800,000 


13.56 


77,200,000 


July, 






2,026,100,000 


65,400,000 


49,700,000 


87,100,000 


13.49 


77,800,000 


August, . 






1,543,000,000 


49,800,000 


40,200,000 


65,200,000 


12.96 


60,800,000 


September, 






1,556,000,000 


51,900,000 


32,500,000 


86,200,000 


13.31 


62,500,000 


October, '. 






1,457,200,000 


47,000,000 


37,300,000 


70,100,000 


13.30 


70,200,000 


November, 






1,826,700,000 


60,900,000 


40,600,000 


137,400,000 


13.75 


64,800,000 


December, 






1,972,000,000 


63,600,000 


49,400,000 


98,000,000 


13.65 


67,600,000 


Total, 


26,353,600,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


72,000,000 


51,100,000 


109,300,000 


13.44 


70,800,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot Gallons for Pumping at the East Boston Station, 

Volume (26,353.6 Million Gallons) X Lift (13.44 Feet) = 354,192.4 Million Foot Gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 

Million Foot 

Gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, .... 



$32,673 28 

39,911 76 

1,168 27 

117 97 

1,987 68 

37 48 

2,152 35 



$0.09225 
0.11268 
0.00330 
0.00033 
0.00561 
0.00011 
0.00608 




1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



171 



Charlestown Pumping Station. 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impeller wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 8.25 
feet in diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines of 
the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 51,600,000 foot pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 41,400,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screen men 

and 1 relief screen man. 
Coal used: bituminous, costing from $8.25 to $17.50 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average Duty 
(Foot Pounds 

per 100 
Pounds Coal). 


1920. 

January, . 




1,182,500,000 


38,100,000 


30,100,000 


46,200,000 


7.98 


55,600,000 


February, 






1,160,200,000 


40,000,000 


30,500,000 


66,700,000 


7.76 


51,500,000 


March, 






1,921,400,000 


62,900,000 


35,700,000 


73,300,000 


6.74 


65,000,000 


April, 






1,522,600,000 


50,800,000 


30,800,000 


69,000,000 


8.37 


70,700,000 


May, 






1,459,800,000 


47,100,000 


31,100,000 


73,500,000 


7.67 


59,800,000 


June, 






1,485,400,000 


49,500,000 


37,200,000 


67,400,000 


7.46 


60,600,000 


July, 






1,092,400,000 


35,400,000 


27,800,000 


49,800,000 


6.65 


40,300,000 


August, . 






1,017,800,000 


32,800,000 


25,200,000 


40,700,000 


6.12 


37,400,000 


September, 






1,028,800,000 


34,300,000 


23,400,000 


56,600,000 


7.58 


50,800,000 


October, . 






957,400,000 


30,900,000 


21,800,000 


58,500,000 


7.18 


41,000,000 


November, 






1,094,800,000 


36,500,000 


23,700,000 


68,500,000 


7.42 


45,600,000 


December, 






1,184,400,000 


38,200,000 


27,400,000 


58,800,000 


7.45 


40,800,000 


Total, 


15,107,500,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


41,400,000 


28,700,000 


60,800,000 


7.37 


51,600,000 



172 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Average Cost per Million Foot Gallons for Pumping at the Charlestown Station. 

Volume (15,107.5 Million Gallons) X Lift (7.37 Feet) = 111,342.3 Million Foot Gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 

Million Foot 

Gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste 

Water, 

Packing 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, .... 



$20,989 73 

14,462 45 

504 94 

24 48 

715 98 

21 01 

312 11 



50.18852 
0.12989 
0.00453 
0.00022 
0.00643 
0.00019 
0.00280 




Alewife Brook Pwnjring Station. 

The plant at this station consists of tw r o 9-inch Andrews com- 
mercial centrifugal pumps, direct connected by horizontal shafts to 
compound marine engines, together with a pump and engine added 
later. The latter consists of a specially designed engine of the ver- 
tical cross-compound type, having between the cylinders a centrif- 
ugal pump rotating on a horizontal axis. 

Contract capacity of the 2 original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13- 
foot lift. 

Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 19,200,000 foot pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 5,156,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screen men and 1 relief screen 
man. 

Coal used: bituminous, costing from $8.80 to $18.51 per gross ton. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



173 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Alewife Brook Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average Duty 
(Foot Pounds 

per 100 
Pounds Coal). 


1920 

January, . 




122,651,000 


3,956,000 


3,622,000 


4,260,000 


13.08 


15,200,000 


February, 






127,164,000 


4,385,000 


3,526,000 


6,754,000 


13.07 


15,700,000 


March, 






298,110,000 


9,616,000 


4,260,000 


16,000,000 


13.10 


26,600,000 


April, 






251,590,000 


8,386,000 


7,285,000 


9,173,000 


13.06 


25,900,000 


May, 






228,728,000 


7,378,000 


6,076,000 


9,350,000 


13.00 


24,400,000 


June, 






201,301,000 


6,710,000 


5,300,000 


8,760,000 


13.00 


24,200,000 


July, 






140,429,000 


4,530,000 


4,376,000 


6,518,000 


12.92 


19,400,000 


August, . 






94,138,000 


3,037,000 


2,739,000 


3,814,000 


13.03 


15,100,000 


September, 






88,814,000 


2,960,000 


2,503,000 


4,318,000 


13.05 


15,000,000 


October, . 






83,605,000 


2,697,000 


2,456,000 


4,318,000 


12.99 


14,700,000 


November, 






105,261,000 


3,509,000 


2,456,000 


7,816,000 


13.02 


16,200,000 


December, 






146,050,000 


4,711,000 


3,910,000 


6,459,000 


13.05 


17,500,000 


Total, 


1,887,841,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


5,156,000 


4,042,000 


7,295,000 


13.03 


19,200,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot Gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook Station. 

Volume (1,887.841 Million Gallons) X Lift (13.03 Feet) = 24,598.57 Million Foot Gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost per 

Million Foot 

Gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil, . 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals 

Totals, 
Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous 



$7,773 92 
6,276 89 
370 62 
138 53 
282 48 
24 59 
489 84 



$15,356 87 
$4,575 33 



$0.31603 
0.25517 
0.01507 
0.00563 
0.01149 
0.00100 
0.01991 



1.62430 



174 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



South Metropolitan System. 
Ward Street Pumping Station. 

At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, 
of the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the 
plungers of which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch stroke. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 77,241,000 foot pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 34,261,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 5 oilers, 4 assistant 

engineers, 1 machinist and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: bituminous, costing from $8.10 to $19.48 per gross ton. 
Material intercepted at screens during the year: 1,788.6 cubic yards. 

Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Ward Street Pumping 
Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average Duty 
(Foot Pounds 

per 100 
Pounds Coal). 


1920 

January, . 




927,260,000 


29,911,000 


26,568,000 


35,230,000 


42.90 


80,403,000 


February, 






886,185,000 


30,558,000 


27,351,000 


40,121,000 


42.67 


75,840,000 


March, 






1,500,659,000 


48,404,000 


29,628,000 


64,749,000 


41.85 


87,200,000 


April, 






1,301,307,000 


43,377,000 


38,717,000 


47,345,000 


41.49 


82,132,000 


May, 






1,331,647,000 


42,956,000 


38,539,000 


60,294,000 


41.55 


80,000,000 


June, 






1,289,867,000 


42,996,000 


36,473,000 


54,753,000 


41.00 


82,751,000 


July, 






957,081,000 


30,873,000 


25,483,000 


40,850,000 


40.78 


74,300,000 


August, . 






793,845,000 


25,607,000 


22,347,000 


33,684,000 


41.68 


69,638,000 


September, 






783,596,000 


26,120,000 


21,305,000 


34,392,000 


41.69 


70,700,000 


October, . 






772,490,000 


24,919,000 


22,805,000 


35,153,000 


41.85 


68,870,000 


November, 






918,092,000 


30,603,000 


23,138,000 


58,723,000 


41.60 


77,952,000 


December, 






1,078,947,000 


34,804,000 


29,710,000 


47,551,000 


41.32 


77,107,000 


Total, 


12,540,976,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


34,261,000 


28,505,000 


46,070,000 


41.70 


77,241,000 



Records from plunger displacements. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



175 



Average Cost per Million Foot Gallons for Pumping at the Ward Street Station. 

Volume (12,540.976 Million Gallons) X Lift (41.70 Feet) = 522,958.70 Million Foot Gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 

Million Foot 

Gallons. 



Labor, . . . . - . 

■Coal, 

Oil 

"Waste, 

"Water, 

Packing, . . . . . . 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, .... 



$26,844 51 

35,474 76 

620 51 

80 32 

1,650 24 

131 25 

4,509 95 




$0.05133 
0.06784 
0.00119 
0.00015 
0.00316 
0.00025 
0.00862 



1.13254 



Quincy Pumping Station. 

At this station are two compound condensing Deane pumping 
engines and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a Sturtevant 
compound condensing engine. 



Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Deane, 3,000,000 gallons; Deane, 5,000,000 gal- 
lons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 

Average duty for the year: 31,000,000 foot pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 5,918,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screen men and 1 relief screen 
man. 

Coal used: bituminous, costing from $8.80 to $19.05 per gross ton. 

Material intercepted at screen during the year: 363 cubic yards. 



176 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION 



[Jan. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping Station 

of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet). 


Average Duty 
(Foot Pounds 

per 100 
Pounds Coal) 


1920 

January, . 




127,399,000 


4,110,000 


3,717,000 


4,642,000 


23.13 


28,500,000 


February, 






125,301,000 


4,321,000 


3,782,000 


5,183,000 


22.38 


27,200,000 


March, 






335,003,000 


10,807,000 


4,405,000 


16,627,000 


29.06 


37,800,000 


April, 






261,514,000 


8,717,000 


6,660,000 


10,920,000 


27.97 


34,600,000 


May, 






258,391,000 


8,335,000 


5,830,000 


12,974,000 


31.38 


37,500,000 


June, 






248,324,000 


8,277,000 


5,679,000 


12,521,000 


29.29 


36,600,000 


July, 






153,588,000 


4,954,000 


4,205,000 


5,947,000 


25.03 


30,100,000 


August, . 






133,826,000 


4,317,000 


3,660,000 


5,242,000 


22.49 


28,000,000 


September, 






114,676,000 


3,823,000 


3,390,000 


4,195,000 


21.81 


27,300,000 


October, . 






110,119,000 


3,552,000 


3,192,000 


4,341,000 


21.22 


25,900,000 


November, 






127,072,000 


4,236,000 


3,151,000 


6,313,000 


22.71 


28,200,000 


December, 






172,695,000 


5,571,000 


4,950,000 


6,979,000 


26.39 


30,800,000 


Total, 


2,167,908,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


5,918,000 


4,385,000 


7,990,000 


25.24 


31,000,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot Gallons for Pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (2,167.908 Million Gallons) X Lift (25.24 Feet) = 54,718.0 Million Foot Gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 

Million Foot 

Gallons. 


Labor, ............. 


$8,005 41 


$0.14630 


Coal 












12,001 81 


0.21934 


Oil, 












294 86 


0.00539 


Waste, 












44 64 


0.00082 


Water 












407 62 


0.00745 


Packing, 












43 93 


0.00080 


Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 












501 86 


0.00917 


Totals 


$21,300 13 


$0.38927 


Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 








$4,907 06 


- 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 177 



Nut Island Screen-house. 
The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate 
actuated by small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two 
vertical Deane boilers, 80 horse power each, operate the engines, pro- 
vide heat and light for the house, burn materials intercepted at the 
screens, and furnish power for the Quincy (Hough's Neck) sewage 
lifting station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens: 71,700,000 gallons. 

Total material intercepted at screens: 1,187.0 cubic yards. 

Material intercepted per million gallons of sewage discharged: 1.22 cubic feet. 

Force employed : 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screen men and 1 relief screen 

man. 
Coal used: bituminous, costing $14.25 per gross ton. 

Quincy (Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting Station. 

At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal 
pumps with vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct- 
current motors. 

The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from 
the Nut Island screen-house, and as used at present it does not 
materially increase the amount of coal used at the latter station. 
The effluent is largely ground water. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: about 1,500,000 gallons each, with 20-foot lift. 
Average daily amount pumped: 225,600 gallons. 
Average lift: 14.93 feet. 



178 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Pumping Stations during the Year. 



Gross Tons, Bituminous Coal. 



3 
Ph 

a . 

o3 J- 
la O 



Q 



bfl 


bD 


i 


M 


C 


3 


ft 


3 










a 


ft 




ft 


6 


S 


fX. 


a 


3 


3 


3 


PLh 


Ph 


^ 


Ph 


3 


3 


O 3 
O o 


+3 


o 


jS 


M.y 




ta 3 


-S a 


wi 


is 3 


O o 


M O 


£& 


02.9 


#-3 


J- o3 




T3 53 
C3M 


w 


O 


< 


£ 



M 

3 

'ft 

s 

3 
Ph 
>> . 
3 O 



T3 
3 
83 

eq 

3 
-*> O 
3,3 







Maritime Coaling Company, 
Maritime Coaling Company, 
Maritime Coaling Company, 
Maritime Coaling Company, 
Maritime Coaling Company, 
Furber Coal Company, 
Maritime Coaling Company, 
Metropolitan Coal Company, 
Maritime Coaling Company, 
Metropolitan Coal Company, 
Maritime Coaling Company, 
Maritime Coaling Company, 
Maritime Coaling Company, 
Metropolitan Coal Company, 
Maritime Coaling Company, 
Wm. A. Jepson Corp., . 
Wm. A. Jepson Corp., . 
Locke Coal Company, . 
Equitable Fuel Company, 
Wm. A. Jepson Corp., . 
Locke Coal Company, . 
New Eng. Coal & Coke Company, 
Geo. E. Warren Company, . 
Batchelder Bros., . 
Wm. A. Jepson Corp., . 
Potts Run Coal Company, . 
Metropolitan Coal Company, 
J. A. Whittemore's Sons, 
Metropolitan Coal Company, 
Equitable Fuel Company, 
Metropolitan Coal Company, 



400 
605 
500 
800 
1,000 



475 
250 
177 
600 
79 
971 



290 

300 

58 

300 



78 
80 
34 
117 
103 
77 
52 



266 
193 
215 

72 
156 
129 

39 
663 
256 



$12 50 

13 50 

14 50 

16 75. 

17 50 
10 60 

12 50 

13 25 

14 00 

15 15 
17 50 
10 50 

14 00 

15 12 

17 50 
9 50 

10 01 

13 25 

14 35 

15 08 

16 03 

18 51 
8 10 

8 79 

9 56 
9 85 

11 50 

11 75 

12 32 

13 80 
15 72 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



179 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Pumping Stations during the Year — 

Concluded. 







Gross Tons 


, Bituminous C 


OAL. 








Deer Island Pumping 
Station. 


a 
"a 

S 
3 
fc 

c 
o 

a: a 
o O 
«•£ 


M 

a 
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a 

3 

a 
£ . 

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O 


ft 

a 

3 
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X . 

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a 

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a 

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o 

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Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


86 


- 


- 


$16 24 


Geo. E. Warren Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


422 


- 


- 


16 25 


Geo. E. Warren Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


41 


- 


- 


17 38 


Thomas J. McCue, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


74 


- 


- 


19 48 


Geo. E. Warren Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 


- 


8 80 


Geo. E. Warren Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


45 


- 


9 60 


Wm. A. Jepson Corp 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


90 


- 


10 24 


Wm. A. Jepson Corp., . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


51 


- 


10 43 


Equitable Fuel Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


109 


- 


14 74 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


44 


- 


15 05 


Geo. E. Warren Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


241 


- 


17 15 


Geo. E. Warren Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


106 


- 


18 15 


J. F. Sheppard & Sons, Inc., 


- - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22 


- 


19 05 


Maritime Coaling Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


400 


14 25 


Total bituminous, . 


3,305 


2,552 


948 


541 


2,612 


740 


400 


- 


Average cost 


$15 53 


$14 49 


$14 10 


$13 70 


$13 00 


$14 75 


$14 25 


- 



Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls. 

The metropolitan sewerage districts now have outfalls in Boston 
Harbor at five points, two of which may discharge sewage from the 
north district and three from the south district. These outfalls are 
all in good condition. 

During the year the sewage of the north district has been dis- 
charged wholly through the outlet located near Deer Island light. 
The other outfall of this system is closed by a cast-iron cover which 
can be easily removed. 

Of the outfalls of the south district, two extend for a distance 
exceeding 1 mile from the shore of Nut Island, Quincy, and the 
third one, called an emergency outlet, extends about 1,500 feet from 



180 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

the same. During the flood period of March, 1920, all three of these 
outfalls were in operation. No discharge is made through the 
emergency outlet excepting at such flood periods. 

An examination by diver was made of the metropolitan sewerage 
outfalls. Those on the south line were found to be clear of deposit 
and in excellent condition. The outfall near the Deer Island light 
is in good condition, but there was considerable deposit in the outer 
portion of the discharge pipes. One of the discharge openings was 
found to be entirely choked with grease. These obstacles were all 
removed. Evidently this type of outfall is going to need more at- 
tention than those designed originally. 

During the year the average flow through the North Metropolitan 
District outfall at Deer Island has been 74,000,000 gallons of sew- 
age per 24 hours, with a maximum rate of 151,200,000 gallons 
during a stormy period on March 17, 1920. The amount of sewage 
discharged in the North Metropolitan District averaged 129 gallons 
per day for each person, taking the estimated population of the dis- 
trict contributing sewage. If the sewers in this district were re- 
stricted to the admission of sewage proper only, this per capita 
amount would be considerably decreased. 

In the South Metropolitan District an average of 71,700,000 
gallons of sewage has passed daily through the screens at the Nut 
Island screen-house, and has been discharged from the outfalls into 
the outer harbor. The maximum rate of discharge per day which 
occurred during a heavy storm on March 13, 1920, was 234,000,000 
gallons. The discharge of sewage through these outfalls represents 
the amount of sewage contributed by the South Metropolitan Dis- 
trict, which was at the rate of 197 gallons per day per person of the 
estimated number contributing sewage in the district. 

The daily discharge of sewage per capita is considerably larger 
in the South Metropolitan District than it is in the North Metro- 
politan District, because, owing to the large size and unused capacity 
of the south district high-level sewer, more storm water is at present 
admitted to the sewers of this district. 

Material intercepted at the Screens. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the North Metropolitan 
sewerage stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating ma- 
terials, has during the year amounted to 1,304.8 cubic yards. This 









1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 181 

is equivalent to 1.301 cubic feet for each million gallons of sewage 
pumped at Deer Island. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the South Metropolitan 
sewerage stations has amounted to 3,338.3 cubic yards, equal to 
3.435 cubic feet per million gallons of sewage delivered at the out- 
fall works at Nut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the metropolitan sewers and siphons in- 
dicate that they are free from deposit. 



Boston, January 1, 1921. 



FREDERICK D. SMITH, 

Director and Chief Engineer. 



APPENDIX 



1S4 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Appendix No. 1 



Contracts made and pending during 

[The details of contracts made before 



Number 

of 
Contract. 



3931 



2i 



6 1 



39-M 



2. 

WORK. 



Furnishing 820 tons cast-iron 
water pipe; 90 tons 12-inch, 
400 tons 16-inch and 330 tons 
36-inch pipe and 25 tons 
special castings. (Contract 
also included 90 tons 16-inch 
pipe for Metropolitan Sew- 
erage Works.) 

Furnishing 2 vertical fire tube 
boilers for Chestnut Hill 
Pumping Station No. 1. 

Resurfacing Massachusetts 
Avenue in Arlington for 
about 1,000 feet. 

Building and erecting pump- 
ing engine for Chestnut Hill 
Pumping Station No. 1. 



Furnishing 35 kilowatt electric 
lighting unit for Chestnut 
Hill Pumping Station No. 2. 

Six street chambers for Venturi 
meter registers. 

Purchase and removal of used 
35 h. p. Blake & Knowles 
pumping engine and 50 h. p. 
locomotive type boiler at 
sewerage pumping station in 
Clinton. 

Purchase and removal of three 
used 150 h. p. horizontal re- 
turn tubular boilers at 
Chestnut Hill Pumping 
Station. 

Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Sudbury Dam in South- 
borough. 



Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



Amount of Bid. 



4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 



5. 

Lowest. 



$37,555 00 ■ 



21,800 00 



3,300 00 



86,600 00 



3,960 00 

3,000 00 
81 00» 

301 00» 



$37,475 00 



19,790 00 2 



3,031 802 



75,900 00 



3,649 002 

2,628 00 « 
287 502, 4 

500 00 2, * 



6. 

Contractor. 



Warren Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., Phillips- 
burg, N. J. 



D. M. Dillon Steam 
Boiler Works, Fitch- 
burg, Mass. 

John A. Gaffey, Med- 
ford, Mass. 



Worthington Pump 
and Machinery Cor- 
poration, New York. 



Ames Iron Works, 
Oswego, N. Y. 



Hodge Boiler Works, 
East Boston. 

H. Aronofsky & Sons, 
Boston. 



Thomas Rush, Boston. 



Edison Electric Illum- 
inating Co. of Bos- 
ton. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 

3 Next to highest bid. 



1921, 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



185 



Appendix No. 1. 



the Year 1920 — Water Division. 

1920 have been given in previous reports.] 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1920. 



June 10, 1919 



May 27, 1920 



June 11, 1920 



Oct. 29, 1920 



Aug. 25, 1920 

Nov. 12, 1920 

Dec. 4, 1920 

Dec. 22, 1920 

Dec. 21, 1914 



Aug. 3, 1920 See previous report, 



July 17, 1920 



Dec. 18, 1920 



Jan. 1, 1922 



For whole work, $19,790, 



For whole work, $3,031.80, 



For pumping engine with capacity of 15,000,000 
United States gallons in 24 hours when operated at 
a plunger speed of not over 250 feet per minute 
against a head of 190 feet, and which when operated 
at said capacity against a head of 150 feet on duty 
trial shall perform a duty of 145,000,000 foot pounds 
for each 1,000 pounds of saturated steam supplied 
to the engine, $75,900. 

For 35 kilowatt, direct connected, steam engine driven 
center crank electric generating unit f. o. b. cars, 
Newton Center, $3,649.. 

For each chamber, $438, 



For used engine and boiler, $287.50, 



For three used boilers, $500, 



About 5,000,000 kilowatt hours of energy per year at 
$6.25 per thousand kilowatt hours. 



1,157 56 1 



3,031 80 



1,600 00 

200 00 

287 50 



139,447 14 



1 Highest bid. 

5 Contract based upon bid of $6.25 per thousand kilowatt hours for entire output. Other bid for por- 
tion of output. 



ISO 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION 



[Jan. 



Contracts made and pending during 



10 



11 



1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 



12 



13 



14 



51-M 



64-M6 



1-Mi 



2-M' 



3-Mi 



2. 

WORK. 



Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Washusett Dam in Clinton. 



8,000 tons bituminous coal, 



Repairs to Green fuel econo- 
mizer at Spot Pond Pump- 
ing Station. 

Shaking and dumping grate 
for Chestnut Hill Pumping 
Station. 

Demolition of chimney at 
Mystic Pumping Station in 
West Somerville. 



Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



4 
under 
W. W. 
Speci- 
fica- 
tions. 

3 
under 
Deal- 
ers' 
Speci- 
fica- 
tions. 



Amount of Bid. 



4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 



5. 

Lowest. 



S3. 25 per 
gr. ton. 



$2,835 00 



$5.30 per 

M 

kilowatt 

hours. 

$3.09 2 per 
gr. ton. 



$1,400 00 "- 



Contractor. 



New England Power 
Co. and Edison Elec- 
tric Illuminating Co. 
of Boston. 

George E. Warren Co., 
Boston. 



Green Fuel Econo- 
mizer Co., Beacon, 

N. Y. 

Perfection Grate and 
Supply Co., Spring- 
field, Mass. 

Thomas A. Elston Co., 
Inc., Boston. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



187 



the Year 1920 — Water Division — Continued. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



Jan. 13, 1917 



May 7, 1919 



Jan. 13, 1920 



July 15, 1920 



Aug. 28, 1920 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



Jan. 1, 1929 



April 19, 1920 



Aug. 16, 1920 



Dec. 31, 1920 



Nov. 17, 1920 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



About 7,000,000 kilowatt hours of energy per year at 
$5.30 per thousand kilowatt hours. 



See previous report. 



For whole work, $3,388, 



For grate, $9.50 per sq. ft. ; ring for 84-inch boiler, 
and for repair parts for existing grate, $92.69. 



For whole work, $1,400, 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1920. 



),313 75 



20,980 48 



3,388 00 



1,011 19 



1,365 31 



10 



11 



12 



13 



14 



« About 1,800 tons shipped between Nov. 17, 1919, and April 9, 1920, were diverted by United States 
Railroad Administration. Feb. 2, 1920, dealer increased price to $3.10 net ton, and April 9 again increased 
price to $5 net ton. 

7 Competitive bids were not received. 



188 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1920 — Water Division — 

Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts, 1895 to 1929, inclusive. 1 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1920. 



Distribution Section, 3 contracts, 
Pumping Service, 3 contracts, 



401 contracts completed from 1896 to 1919, inclusive, 



Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston, 
Total of 407 contracts, 



$47,389 36 
1,600 00 



$48,989 36 
17,606,480 43 



$17,655,469 79 
512,000 00 



$17,143,469 79 



1 In this summary contracts for the sale of used material and contracts charged to maintenance are 
excluded. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



189 









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190 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 



Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1920. 



Day of Month. 



a 
< 



> 
o 



1.36 2 



O.lOi 



0.67 1 



0.36 1 



0.802 

0.10 
0.28 1 



3 

3.20 2 



0.751 



0.39i 



1 . 20 2 



0.611 



0.47i 

3 

0.31 2 
0.40 2 



3 

2.67 



1.00 



0.16 



3 

0.96i 



3.67 



7.33 



0.14 



0.17 



0.80 



1.00 2 



0.31i 



0.92 



1.85 



5.10 



3 

1.61 



0.03 



3 

0.45 



0.92 



0.09 
0.08 



2.00 



2.50 



3 

0.12 
0.06 

3 
3 

3.08 



0.38 
0.37 



1.01 



0.51 



0.84 



3 

1.25 



6.52 



3.54 



0.10 



6.61 



0.55 
0.45 



1.25 



0.26 



0.30 



0.25 



0.23 



4.84 



0.25 
0.25 



2.56 



1.16 

0.06 
0.412 

0.05 



0.05 



3 

1.10 



3 

0.78 = 

3 

0.12: 
1.74 



3 

0.15- 



3 

2.17 



3 

0.73 

3 

3.91 



6.32 



3 

0.65 



0.70 



1.84 



3 
3 

2.24 
0.20i 



5.38 



3 

0.432 



3 

0.932 



6.32 



1 Snow. 



Total for the year, 58.89 inches. 
2 Rain and snow. 3 Rainfall included in that following. 



1921 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



191 



Table No. 3. — Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1920. 



Day of Month. 


>> 

c3 

a 

>-5 


>> 
u 

a 

3 
u 



u 

3 


"u 

< 


>> 


a? 
a 

1-5 


>-5 


m 
3 
M 

< 


u 

£2 

£ 


C 
a> 







C 


a 

> 



S 
O 

P 


1, 










- 


- 


- 


3 


0.03 


- 


- 


3 


0.06 


- 


- 


0.63 


2, 










- 


- 


- 


0.84 


3 


- - 


- 


0.03 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.30 


- 


0.82 


- 


- 


- 


0.86 


3 


4, 










- 


~ 


- 


3 


0.41 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


5, 










- 


3 


3 


0.61 - 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


0.01 


- 


1.11 


G, 










- 


3 


2. 08 2 


3 


- 


2.40 


- 


3 


3 


- 


- 


- 


7, 










- 


2.86 2 


- 


0.25i 


- 


- 


- 


0.38 


0.13 


- 


0.03 


- 


8, 










3 


- 


- 


- 


0.61 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


9, 










1.16 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.04 


- 


3 


- 


0.02 


3 


10, 










- 


0.302 


- 


- 


0.07 


- 


- 


3 


1.06 


- 


- 


3 


11, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.06 


- 


0.01 


0.35 


- 


- 


- 


0.27 


12, 










3 


- 


3 


- 


3 


3 


0.06 


- 


3 


0.03 


- 


- 


13, 










0.08 1 


0.73i 


1.11 


0.65 


0.16 


0.07 


- 


3 


0.44 


- 


- 


3 


14, 










- 


3 


- 




0.38 


- 


- 


0.11 


0.01 


- 


- 


1.78 


15, 










- 


0.80 


- 


- 


0.13 


0.29 


0.20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16, 










3 


- 


3 


0.02 


- 


3 


- 


0.15 


0.02 


- 


3 


- 


17, 










0.56i 


- 


0.17 


- 


- 


3 


- 


0.03 


- 


- 


2.21 


- 


18, 










- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


2.88 


3 


0.02 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


19, 










0.15i 


0.942 


3 


- 


- 


- 


0.25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20, 










O.lSi 


- 


0.92 2 


3 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21, . 










- 


3 


- 


3 


3 


0,66 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


3 


- 


22, . 










- 


0.321 


- 


3 


3 


0.85 


- 


0.20 


- 


- 


3 


3 


23, . 










3 


3 


- 


1.62 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.52 


0.62 


24, . 










3 


3 


- 


- 


1.60 


- 


0.43 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


25, . 










0.872 


0.902 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.23 


- 


26, . 










3 


- 


0.21 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


27, . 










3 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


3 


0.91 


28, . 










0.29 2 


0.04i 


- 


1.11 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


0.14 


0.97 


0.05 


- 


29, . 










- 


- 


0.23 


- 


- 


0.01 


- 


0.03 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


30, . 










- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


0.01 


- 


0.10 


3 


- 


- 


- 


31, . 










- 


- 


- 


0.13 


- 


- 


0.07 


0.37 


1.47 


- 


- 


- 


T< 


3tals, 




3.29 


6.89 


4.72 


5.23 


3.75 


7.18 


1.88 


1.78 


3.35 


1.02 


5.92 


5.32 



1 Snow. 



Total for the year, 50.33 inches. 
2 Rain and snow. 3 Rainfall included in that following. 



192 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1920. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Jan. 9, . 




1.10 1 


3.00 a.m. to 11.30 P.M. 


May 2, . 


1 


.82 


11.30 a.m. to 




Jan. 13, 








.121 


5.15 a.m. to 


1.45 p.m. 


May 4, 




/ 






1.00 p.m. 


Jan. 16, 






\ 


.781 


9.00 p.m. to 




May 8, 




( 


.78 


11.45 a.m. to 




Jan. 17, 






/ 






10.45 a.m. 


May 9, 




J 






4.30 a.m. 


Jan. 19, 








.181 


4.45 p.m. to 


10.30 p.m. 


May 10, 






.05 


4.30 p.m. to 


5.45 p.m. 


Jan. 20, 






I 


.182 


8.10 p.m. to 




May 11, 






.07 


8.00 a.m. to 


8.30 p.m. 


Jan. 21, 






J 






3.00 A.M. 


May 13, 






.18 


4.45 a.m. to 


1.30 p.m. 


Jan. 23, 








.041 


12.30 a.m. to 


7.30 a.m. 


May 14, 




} 


.22 


1.40 p.m. to 




Jan. 23, 






\ 


.481 


4.15 p.m to 




May 15, 








2.00 A.M. 


Jan. 24, 






1 






4.30 a.m. 


May 15, 






.07 


1.00 p.m. to 


1.40 p.m. 


Jan. 24, 






\ 


.471 


10.15 A.M. tO 




May 21, 




1 


.2.59 


3.45 p.m. to 




Jan. 25, 






) 






2.45 p.m. 


May 24, 




/ 






1.00 A.M. 


Jan. 27, 








.16 


8.30 a.m. to 11.45 


















Jan. 28, 








.161 


7.00 a.m. to 


4.00 p.m. 


Total, 




4.78 






Total, 


3.67 




Feb. 5, . 


\ 


2.512 


2.10 A.M. tO 




June 5, . 


1 


2.45 


2.15 a.m. to 




Feb. 6, . 




{ 






2.15 A.M. 


June 6, . 


/ 






3.15 A.M. 


Feb. 6, . 




.89 2 


9.30 A.M. to 




June 13, . 




.04 


6.15 a.m. to 


4.00 p.m. 


Feb. 7, . 




/ 






2.45 a.m. 


June 15, 


\ 


.67 


2.40 p.m. to 




Feb. 10, 






.19* 


8.30 A.M. to 


7.00 p.m. 


June 16, 


/ 






3.15 A.M. 


Feb. 13, 






.55i 


6.45 a.m. to 


7.00 p.m. 


June 16, 


I 


2.46 


10.00 a.m. to 




Feb. 15, 






.89 


3.30 A.M. to 10.30 A.M. 


June 19, 


/ 






2.15 A.M. 


Feb. 19. 






.78 2 


3.30 a.m. to 


3.45 p.m. 


June 21, 


} 


.43 


4.00 A.M. to 




Feb. 21, 




\ 


.301 


9.45 p.m. to 




June 22, 






4.30 a.m. 


Feb. 22, 




{ 






6.30 a.m. 


June 22, 




.14 


4.20 p.m. to 


7.00 p.m. 


Feb. 23, 




.96 2 


7.00 p.m. to 




June 28, 


I 


.05 


5.15 p.m. to 




Feb. 25, 




/ 






10.00 A.M. 


June 29, 


/ 






3.00 A.M. 


Feb. 28, 




i 


.09i 


8.00 p.m. to 




June 30, 




.02 


10.00 a.m. to 11 


Feb. 29, 




/ 






1.45 A.M. 




























Total, 




6.26 






Total, 


7.16 














I 


1.172 


8.30 p.m. to 






Mar. 5, . 












Mar. 6, . 




/ 






8.00 A.M. 


July 3, . 




.69 


10.00 a.m. to 


8.30 p.m. 


Mar. 6, . 






.14i 


8.00 a.m. to 


3.30 p.m. 


July 9, 




1 


.04 


11.30 p.m. to 




Mar. 13, 






1.27 


6.15 a.m. to 


8.20 p.m. 


July 10, 




{ 






12.30 a.m. 


Mar. 16, 




\ 


.15 


1.15 p.m. to 




July 11, 




.10 


11.15 p.m. to 




Mar. 17, 










1.30 A.M. 


July 12, 




/ 






8.00 p.m. 


Mar. 19, 




1 


1.021 


6.45 p.m. to 




July 15, 






.29 


12.25 p.m. to 


9.00 p.m. 


Mar. 20, 




J 






6.00 p.m. 


July 18, 




} 


.20 


5.30 p.m. to 




Mar. 25, 




1 


.08 


6.30 p.m. to 




July 19, 








10.30 A.M. 


Mar. 26, 




J 






7.00 A.M. 


July 22, 






.02 


4.20 a.m. to 


4.30 a.m. 


Mar. 26, 




| 


.05 


11.00 p.m. to 




July 24, 






.18 


1.30 A.M. tO 


6.00 A.M. 


Mar. 27, 




J 






2.30 a.m. 


July 24, 






.24 


3.25 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


Mar. 29, 






.28 


10.45 a.m. to 


10.45 p.m. 




























Total, 




1.76 






Total, 


4.16 














.87 


1.20 A.M. tO 






Apr. 2, . 














Apr. 3, 












1.45 A.M. 


Aug. 2, . 




.04 


4.00 a.m. to 


6.30 a.m. 


Apr. 4, 








.872 


12.20 p.m. to 




Aug. 2 




} 


.03 


11.00 p.m. to 




Apr. 5, 












8.40 p.m. 


Aug. 3, 








2.30 a.m. 


Apr. 7, 








.252 


3.00 A.M. to 


4.00 p.m. 


Aug. 7, 






.28 


4.50 a.m. to 


7.30 a.m. 


Apr. 12, 








.59 


11.30 p.m. to 




Aug. 7. 






.52 


3.00 p.m. to 


6.00 p.m. 


Apr. 14, 












7.00 A.M. 


Aug. 8, 






.07 


3.00 p.m. to 


4.30 p.m. 


Apr. 16, 








04 


1.30 A.M. tO 


2.00 p.m. 


Aug. 11, 


\ 


.18 


2.15 a.m. to 




Apr. 21, 






1 


1.04 


4.30 A.M. to 




Aug. 12, 








7.00 A.M. 


Apr. 22, 






[ 






4.00 p.m. 


Aug. 13, 


1 


.10 


9.40 a.m. to 




Apr. 23, 






f 


1.05 


5.15 a.m. to 




Aug. 14, 


) 






8.00 A.M. 


Apr. 24, 






j 






3.45 a.m. 


Aug. 15, 




.03 


3.45 a.m. to 


6.30 a.m. 


Apr. 27, 






1 


1.23 


8.00 p.m. to 




Aug. 16, 




.07 


6.30 p.m. to 


9.45 P.M. 


Apr. 28, 






j 






3.00 p.m. 


Aug. 18, 




.02 


12.15 a.m. to 10.30 A.M. 


Apr. 29, 








.04 


6.30 p.m. to 


6.45 p.m. 


Aug. 22, 




.17 


1.15 A.M. tO 


2.00 p.m. 


Apr. 30, 






} 


.12 


5.15 a.m. to 




Aug. 29, 




.03 


4.15 p.m. to 


6.00 p.m. 


May 1, 










9.15 p.m. 


Aug. 31, 




.21 


3.10 p.m. to 


4.30 p.m. 


Tota 


1, 




6.10 


Tota 


1, 


1.75 





1 Snow. 



2 Rain and snow 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



193 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1920 

Concluded. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Sept. 1, . 




.04 


7.45 a.m. to 


8.15 A.M. 


Nov. 2, . 


I. 


.91 


9.45 p.m. to 


Sept. 6, . 




} 


.06 


11.30 p.m. to 




Nov. 3, . 


/ 




4.00 A.M. 


Sept. 7, . 








9.00 A.M. 


Nov. 7, . 


t 


.04 


4.40 p.m. to 


Sept. 7, . 






.12 


7.25 p.m. to 


8.15 p.m. 


Nov. 8, . 


J 




4.00 A.M. 


Sept. 10, 




} 


.94 


4.15 a.m. to 




Nov. 9, . 




.02 


4.40 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


Sept. 11, 








7.30 a.m. 


Nov. 16, 


} 


2.07 


2.20 p.m. to 


Sept. 12, 






.04 


3.30 a.m. to 


7.30 a.m. 


Nov. 17, 




5.30 p.m. 


Sept. 12, 




I 


.15 


11.00 p.m. to 




Nov. 21, 




.121 


4.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 


Sept. 13, 




/ 






1.15 A.M. 


Nov. 21, 


1 


2.71 


12.30 p.m. to 


Sept. 13, 






.16 


9.30 a.m. to 11.00 F.,\i 


Nov. 24, 


J 




2.15 A.M. 


Sept. 14, 




\ 


.08 


4.40 p.m. to 




Nov. 24, 


I 


.16 2 


10.15 p.m. to 


Sept. 15, 




J 






7.00 A.M. 


Nov. 25, 


j 




7.15 p.m. 


Sept. 16, 






.05 


4.35 p.m. to 


6.30 p.m. 


Nov. 27, 


.06 2 


6.00 p.m. to 


Sept. 19, 






.06 


12.15 a.m. to 


4.15 A.M. 


Nov. 28, 


/ 




11.00 P.M. 


Sept. 28, 




1 


.13 


8.30 p.m. to 


















Sept. 29, 




j 






1.30 A.M. 


Total, 




6.09 




Sept. 30, 




) 


1.29- 


3.15 a.m. to 


7.30 a.m. 










Oct. 1, . 




















Dec. 1, . 




.55 


8.00 a.m. to 12.00 m. 


Total, 




3.12 






Dec. 3, . 
Dec. 4, . 
Dec. 4, . 
Dec. 5, . 
Dec. 9, . 
Dec. 9, . 


i 


.18 2 

.83 

.101 
.25 


9.00 p.m. to 

7.00 A.M. 

7.00 p.m. to 

9.45 p.m. 
3.30 a.m. to 2.45 p.m. 












6.00 p.m. to 


Oct. 1, . 




.04 


7.30 a.m. to 


1.10 A.M. 


Dec. 10, 


j 




7.00 A.M. 


Oct. 5, 








.03 


12.15 p.m. to 


1.40 P.M. 


Dec. 13, 


\ 


1.29 


10.15 p.m. to 


Oct. 11, 






\ 


.03 


11.20 p.m. to 




Dec. 14, 


j 




7.00 p.m. 


Oct. 12, 






I 






3.00 A.M. 


Dec. 15, 




.05 


2.30 p.m. to 3.15 p.m. 


Oct. 21, 








.02 


5.15 a.m. to 


6.00 A.M. 


Dec. 22, 


} 


.47 


9.15 p.m. to 


Oct. 27, 








.14 


3.45 a.m. to 


4.00 A.M. 


Dec. 23, 




7.15 a.m. 


Oct. 27, 






\ 


.97 


10.30 p.m. to 




Dec. 27, 




.471 


2.00 a.m. to 11.45 A.M. 


Oct. 29, 






J 






6.00 A.M. 


Dec. 27, 
Total, 




.292 


11.45 A.M. to 11.00 P.M. 


Tota 


1, • 




1.23 


4.48 





Total for the year, 50.56 inches. 
1 Snow. 2 Rain and snow. 



194 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



03 


■«* 


Ol 


a 


a 


a 


oo 


OO 


CO 


Of 


Of' 


t* 


eo 


TO 


tO 


eo 


TO 


Ol 


-f 


LO 


eo 


a 


r^ 


to 


CO 


CM 


CM 


«3 


oc 


to 


*# 


-* 1 


t^ 


to 


to 


O 


to 


a 


t^. 


oo 


tO 


00' 


t> 


"—I 


Ol 


to 


CD 


rf 


Ol 


i~ 


a 


CD 


CO 


eo 


O 


_ 


r- 


_* 


oi 


to 


oo 


TO 


CO 


co 


TO 


tO 


r^ 


<* 


r^ 


oo 


O 


^, 


on 


■* 


M 


r- 


TO 


TO 


>o 


». 


to 


«5 


to 


•* 


UO 


•o 


■>* 


«* 


^f 


^ 


<* 


>* 


ec 


■^t* 


co 


CO 


M< 


«* 


co 


■* 


■«* 


CO 


CO 


«* 


•jO 


OO 


-<*i 


H 


















































a 




i 

s . 


_, 


Oi 


eo 


to 


a 


o 


TO' 


oo 


TO 


CD 


a 


CO 


OS 


-* 




to 


c^ 


TO 








■* 


TO 




». 


CO 


-* 


TO 


o 


1"H 


CO 


Ol 


■TO 


oo 


t^ 


CM 


■4 


a 


a 


CO 


o 


TO 


t~~ 


OO 


•H 


oo 


eo 


t^ 


a 


a 


•<*< 


a 




CO 


CO 


ci 


CO 


Oi 


t^ 


CO 


CM 


ec 


■«*< 


■* 


CO 


eo 


Ol 


CO 


■"CM 


Ol 


co 


tO 


Ol 


Ol 


co 


CM 


CD 


ir» 


■<*< 


C 






















































■ 


CM 




■* 


<* 


eo 


co 


CO 


CI 


O) 


tO 


■* 


to 


oo 


r^ 


M< 


Ol 


a 


r^ 


Ol 


tO 


to 


oo 




<TO 


oo 


». 


CO 


OC' 


OS 


•* 


«* 


TO 


CO 


CO 


to 


Ol 


t~ 


TO' 


■CD 


^ H 


^ H 


o 


to 


TO 


^ H 




Ol 


o 


a 


->f 


CO 


■* 


> o 


!>. 


CO 


_ 


CD 


CM 


O 


Ol 


_! 


OJ 


05 


tO 


_i 


_, 


«# 


«* 


Tf 


Ol 


Ol 


CO 


co 


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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



195 



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METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



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1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



207 



Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 

drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District. 

From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct. 

















Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time. 


Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 


1VJ.ONTH. 


Hours. 


Minutes. 


January, ....... 


26 


372 


48 


5,367.5 


February, 














23 


254 


34 


2,950.4 


March, 














21 


231 


25 


2,114.5 


April, 














25 


516 


31 


5,180.7 


May, 














26 


416 


56 


1,771.0 


June, 














24 


351 


40 


2,512.4 


July, 














29 


504 


20 


3,975.6 


August, . 










,, 




27 


420 


55 


4,067.5 


September, 














25 


364 


50 


3,733.8 


October, 














25 


418 


- 


3,136.8 


November, 














25 


336 


40 


2,598.6 


December, 














26 


369 


48 


4,068.0 


Totals, 


302 


189.94 days. 


41,476.8 



From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir. 

















Number of 
Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time. 


Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 


iVXUJNTH. 


Hours. 


Minutes. 


January, . . . 


26 


579 


15 


1,478.3 


February, 














23 


462 


35 


1,277.1 


March, . 














27 


641 


3 


1,387.2 


April, 














25 


510 


46 


1,376.2 


May, 














25 


339 


6 


1,307.3 


June, 














26 


327 


53 


1,282.2 


July, 














25 


304 


4 


1,194.7 


August, . 














26 


309 


56 


1,218.5 


September, 














25 


338 


3 


1,310.5 


October, 














25 


345 


8 


1,353.4 


November, 














25 


360 


54 


1,455.1 


December, 














26 


543 


47 


1,449.6 


Totals, 


304 


210.94 days. 


16,090.1 



208 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION 



[Jan. 



Table No. 13 — Concluded. 

FromFramingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



Month. 


Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time 
(Hours). 


Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 


January, 


31 


744 


2,823.2 


February, 


















29 


696 


2,697.2 


March, . 


















31 


744 


2,630.8 


April, 


















30 


719 


2,098.1 


May, 


















31 


744 


2,061.0 


June, 


















30 


720 


2,243.9 


July, . 


















31 


744 


2,497.8 


August, 


















31 


744 


2,535.4 


September, 


















30 


720 


2,187.3 


October, 


















31 


712 


1,997.1 


November, 


















30 


720 


1,720.6 


December, 












• • 






31 


744 


1,908.1 


Totals, 


366 


364.63 days. 


27,400.5 



Water was drawn from Lake Cochituate to Chestnut Hill Reservoir on 29 days. The total quantity 
drawn was 287,900,000 gallons. 



Table No. 14. 



Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts 
in 1920, by Months. 1 



1 

Month. 


Wachusett 
Aqueduct 

into 
Sudbury 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Weston 

Aqueduct 

into 

Metropolitan 

District 

(Gallons.) 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
into 
Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Cochituate 

Aqueduct 

into 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservoir 

(Gallons). 


January, 


172,935,000 


47,687,000 


91,071,000 


- 


February, 












101,538,000 


44,038,000 


93,007,000 


- 


March, 












68,019,000 


44,748,000 


84,865,000 


- 


April, . 












172,726,000 


45,937,000 


70,033,000 


- 


May, . 












56,916,000 


42,171,000 


66,484,000 


- 


June, . 












83,543,000 


42,740,000 


74,797,000 


- 


July, . 












128,042,000 


38,539,000 


80,574,000 


- 


August, 












131,013,000 


39,306,000 


81,787,000 


- 


September, 










124,280,000 


43,683,000 


72,910,000 


- 


October, 










100,854,000 


43,599,000 


64,336,000 


5,583,000 


November, . 










86,427,000 


48,503,000 


57,353,000 


3,820,000 


December, . 










131,023,000 


46,761,000 


61,552,000 


- 


Average 




113,125,000 


43,962,000 


74,865,000 


787,000 



1 Not including quantities wasted while cleaning and repairing aqueducts. 



1921. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



209 



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METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



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1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



213 






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222 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Table No. 24. 



Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 
1892-1920. 

[Parts per 100,000.] 











Color. 


Residue on 
Evaporation. 


Ammonia. 


6 

a 
O 


B 

a 

CO 

a 
o 

o 

a 
o 
bC 
>. 
X 

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Year. 


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H 


T3 

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CO 

00 

s 


Pi 

a 

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w 


00 
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C 

W 


1892 


.37 


4.70 


1.67 


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.0138 


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.41 


- 


1.9 


1893, 








.53 


4.54 


1.84 


.0010 


.0174 


.0147 


.0027 


.38 


.60 


1.8 


1894, 








.58 


4.64 


1.83 


.0006 


.0169 


.0150 


.0019 


.41 


.63 


1.7 


1895, 








.59 


4.90 


2.02 


.0006 


.0197 


.0175 


.0022 


.40 


.69 


0.7* 


1896, 








.45 


4.29 


1.67 


.0005 


.0165 


.0142 


.0023 


.37 


.56 


1.4 


1897, 








.55 


4.82 


1.84 


.0009 


.0193 


.0177 


.0016 


.40 


.64 


1.6 


1898, 








.40 


4.19 


1.60 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.44 


1.4 


1899, 








.28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.35 


1.1 


1900, 








.29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.38 


1.3 


1901, 








.29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.42 


1.7 


1902, 








.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.40 


1.3 


1903, 








.29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.39 


1.5 


1904, 








.23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.37 


1.5 


1905, 








.24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0021 


.35 


.35 


1.4 


1906, 








.24 


3.86 


1.39 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.36 


1.3 


1907, 








.22 


3.83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.32 


1.3 


1908, 








.19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.26 


1.2 


1909, 








.18 


3.46 


1.43 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0025 


.28 


.25 


1.3 


1910, 








.14 


3.05 


1.24 


.0013 


.0118 


.0102 


.0016 


.28 


.22 


1.1 


1911, 








.25 


4.18 


1.66 


.0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0029 


.38 


.33 


1.4 


1912, 








.17 


3.86 


1.23 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 


.0034 


.36 


.29 


1.7 


1913, 








.13 


3.96 


1.15 


.0014 


.0150 


.0120 


.0026 


.35 


.26 


1.5 


1914, 








.14 


4.12 


1.19 


.0014 


.0138 


.0116 


.0022 


.39 


.25 


1.4 


1915, 








.16 


3.73 


1.04 


.0015 


.0157 


.0134 


.0023 


.38 


.25 


1.4 


1916, 








.18 


4.53 


1.85 


.0013 


.0133 


.0107 


.0026 


.36 


- 


1.4 


1917, 








.15 


4.45 


1.68 


.0015 


.0142 


.0124 


.0018 


.33 


- 


1.3 


1918, 








.18 


3.89 


1.45 


.0019 


.0154 


.0128 


.0026 


.29 


- 


1.4 


1919, 








.20 


4.28 


1.41 


.0010 


.0130 


.0108 


.0022 


.36 


- 


1.5 


1920, 




.17 


4.23 


1.35 


.0012 


.0112 


.0097 


.0014 


.33 


- 


1.5 

5 



1921. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



223 



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1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



225 



Table No. 26. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Vari- 
ous Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 1898-1920. 

[Averages of weekly determinations.] 













Chest> 


"or Hill Reservoir. 


Southern Service Taps. 


Yeak. 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 
Chamber. 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct. 


Effluent 

Gate-bouse 

No. 2. 


Low Service, 

180 Boylston 

Street. 


High Service, 

1 Ashburton 

Place. 


1898, . . . 


207 


145 


Ill 


96 


- 


1899, . 










224 


104 


217 


117 


123 


1900, . 










248 


113 


256 


188 


181 


1901, . 










225 


149 


169 


162 


168 


1902, . 










203 


168 


121 


164 


246 


1903, . 










76 


120 


96 


126 


243 


1904, . 










347 


172 


220 


176 


355 


1905, . 










495 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906, . 










231 


145 


246 


154 


261 


1907, . 










147 


246 


118 


130 


176 


1908, . 










162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909, . 










198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


1910, . 










216 


- 


180 


178 


213 


1911, . 










205 


204 


151 


175 


197 


1912, . 










429 


450 


227 


249 


259 


1913, . 










123 


243 


157 


119 


140 


1914, . 










288 


- 


252 


174 


220 


1915, . 










163 


- 


128 


117 


134 


1916, . 










128 


- 


85 


102 


105 


1917, . 










178 


112 


119 


119 


141 


1918, . 










1,163 


168 


705 


317 


544 


1919, . 










92 


85 


100 


70 


84 


1920, . 










148 


86 


108 


113 


112 



226 



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1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



227 



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METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Table No. 29. 



Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan 
Water Works in 1920. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 











Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Framingham. 


Clinton. 


Month. 


a 

| 

'x 

OS 


g 

a 
*a 


a 

03 
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1 

'x 


a 
1 

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3 


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03 
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3 


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45 


—17 


17.0 


46 


—13 


19.5 


49 


—15 


17.5 


February, 








47 


—19 


22.6 


45 


—16 


24.2 


42 


—20 


23.1 


March, 








68 


—3 


34.7 


68 


4 


37.2 


67 


—3 


35.2 


April, 








72 


31 1 


- 


72 


23 


45.1 


70 


21 


42.7 


May, 








86 


34 


54.8 


87 


31 


55.7 


81 


30 


53.4 


June, 








90 


43 


65.2 


90 


45 


66.1 


85 


44 


63.5 


July, 








89 


48 


70.3 


89 


47 


71.2 


84 


52 


68.9 


August, . 








92 


42 


72.1 


91 


48 


72.5 


86 


47 


70.2 


September, 








89 


38 


64.5 


87 


39 


64.9 


85 


40 


63.1 


October, . 








_i 


34 


- 


81 


34 


58.9 


77 


33 


57.3 


November, 








_i 


20 


- 


62 


20 


38.9 


67 


12 


38.6 


December, 




ear, 




67 


5 


36.7 


56 


5 


33.3 


50 


5 


32.0 


Averages for the y 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


48.95 


- 


- 


47.12 


i — 



1 Thermometer out of order. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



229 












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232 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Table No. 33. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Services metered, 
Fire Services and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities and Towns supplied by 
the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 31, 1920. 



City or Town. 


Services. 


Meters. 


Per Cent 

of Services 

Metered. 


Services 
used for 

Fire 

Purposes 

only. 


Fire 
Hydrants. 


Arlington , 






3,318 


3,318 


100.00 


15 


519 


Belmont, . 










1,903 


1,903 


100.00 


3 


283 


Boston, 












107,708 


67,282 


62.46 


1,930 


9,786 


Chelsea, 












5,256 


5,222 


99.35 


59 


403 


Everett, 












6,140 


4,378 


71.30 


24 


647 


Lexington 












1,353 


1,339 


98.97 


6 


226 


Maiden, 












8,406 


8,186 


97.38 


52 


596 


Medford, 












6,892 


6,892 


100.00 


20 


730 


Melrose, 












4,480 


4,429 


98.86 


20 


383 


Milton, 












2,216 


2,216 


100.00 


1 


448 


Nahant, 












774 


579 


74.81 


- 


102 


Quincy, 












11,027 


10,107 


91.66 


18 


1,253 


Revere, 1 












4,822 


3,895 


80.77 


5 


318 


Somerville, 










13,614 


10,597 


77.84 


41 


1,243 


Stoneham, 










1,696 


1,690 


99.65 


- 


157 


Swampscott, 










2,011 


2,011 


100.00 


2 


208 


Watertown, 










3,471 


3,471 


100.00 


21 


432 


Winthrop, 










3,018 
188,105 


3,004 


99.54 


5 


322 


Totals 


• 


140,519 


74.70 


2,222 


18,056 



1 Includes small portion of Saugus. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



233 



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1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



235 



Append ix No . 3 . 



WATER WORKS STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1920. 

The Metropolitan Water Works supply the Metropolitan Water 
District, which includes the following cities and towns: — 



City or Town. 



Population, 
Census of 1920. 



Estimated 
Population , 
July 1, 1920. 



Arlington, 

Belmont, 

Boston, 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Lexington, 

Maiden, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Milton, 

Nahant, 

Newton,i 

Quincy, 

Revere, 

Somerville, 

Stone ham, . 

Swampscott 

Watertown, 

Winthrop, . 

Total population of Metropolitan Water District 
Portion of Saugus supplied by Revere, . 



18,665 

10,749 

748,060 

43,184 

40,120 

6,350 

49,103 

39,038 

18,204 

9,382 

1,318 

46,054 

47,876 

28,823 

93,091 

7,873 

8,101 

21,457 

15,455 



1,252,903 



18,780 

10,880 

751,810 

43,380 

40,350 

6,390 

49,350 

39,460 

18,270 

9,420 

1,330 

46,210 

48,200 

29,120 

93,530 

7,890 

8,150 

21,530 

15,590 



1,259,640 
280 



1 No water supplied during the year from Metropolitan Water Works. 

Pumping. 
Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1 : — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintard 
Iron Works and E. P. Allis Company. 



236 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Description of coal used — Bituminous: 73.1 per cent Nanty-Glo, Daven- 
port and South Fork. Anthracite: screenings, 26.9 per cent. Price per gross 
ton in bins: bituminous, $7 to $13.04; screenings, $5.86 to $7.74. Average 
price per gross ton, $10.37. Per cent ashes, 15.3. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 2: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used — Bituminous: 72.8 per cent Nanty-Glo, Daven- 
port, South Fork and Clearfield District. Anthracite: screenings, 27.2 per 
cent. Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous, $6.98 to $17.86; screenings, 
$6.44 to $6.90. Average price per gross ton, $10.17. Per cent ashes, 16.9. 

Spot Pond Station: — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company and 

Holly Manufacturing Company. 
Description of coal used — Bituminous: 62.8 per cent Clearfield District, Pool- 

10 and Pool-71. Anthracite: screenings, 37.2 per cent. Price per gross ton 

in bins: bituminous, $8.19 to $16.35; screenings, $5.04 to $7.03. Average 

price per gross ton, $11.70. Per cent ashes, 15.2. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1. 





Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 


Engine 
No. 3. 


Engine 
No. 4. 


Totals. 


Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 


16,000,000 


20,000,000 


30,000,000 


66,000,000 


Coal consumed for year (pounds), 


- 


- 


- 


3,814,711 


Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station ex- 


- 


- 


- 


$44,495 20 


penses. 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million 

gallons). 
Average dynamic head (feet), .... 


1,375.51 
132.55 


8.52 
126.05 


430.06 
128.34 


1,814.09 
131.52 


Cost per million gallons pumped, 


- 


- 


- 


824.5276 


Cost per million foot gallons, .... 


- 


- 


- 


.1865 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 2. 





Engines Nos. 
5, 6 and 7. 


Engine 
No. 12. 


Totals. 


Daily pumping capacity (gallons), ..... 


105,000,000 


40,000,000 


145,000,000 


Coal consumed for year (pounds), ..... 


- 


- 


14,597,063 


Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, . 


- 


- 


$137,012 08 


Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million 

gallons). 
Average dynamic head (feet), ...... 


13,092.32 

29.82 


13,861.67 
123.22 


26,953.99 

77.85 


Cost per million gallons pumped, ..... 


- 


- 


$5.0832 


Cost per million foot gallons, 


- 




.0653 



1921.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



237 



Spot Pond Pumping Station. 



Engines Nos. 
and 9. 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), 
Average dynamic head (feet), ...... 

Cost per million gallons pumped, ..... 

Cost per million foot gallons, ...... 



30,000,000 

3,603,232 

S38,979'06 

3,286.58 

134.64 

$11.8601 

.0881 



Consumption. 

Estimated total population of the eighteen cities and towns sup- 
plied wholly or partially during the year 1920, . . . 1,213,430 

Total consumption (gallons), meter basis, 46,579,167,000 1 

Average daily consumption (gallons), meter basis, . . ■ . 127,265,500 
Gallons per day to each inhabitant, meter basis, . . . 104 . 9 



Distribution. 





Metropolitan 
Water Works. 


Cities and Towns 
supplied by 
Metropolitan 
Water Woiks. 


Kinds of pipe used, 


_i 


— 2 


Sizes, ....... 










76-4 inch. 


48-4 inch. 


Extensions, less length abandoned (miles), 










.05 


9.99 


Length in use (miles), .... 










126.13 


1,932.68 


Stop-gates added, 














9 


- 


Stop-gates now in use, 














553 


- 


Service pipes added, 














- 


2,865 


Service pipes now in use, 














- 


188,052 


Meters added, .... 














- 


4,778 


Meters now in use, . 














- 


140,475 


Fire hydrants added, 














- 


83 


Fire hydrants now in use, 














- 


18,056 



1 69.5 per cent pumped; 30.5 per cent by gravity. 

2 Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought-iron, cement-lined steel and kalamine pipe. 



238 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Appendix No. 4 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 

2 
3 


148 J 
1 

4 


Section 74, Reading Extension, 
North Metropolitan System 
in Stoneham. 

Part of Section 76, reservoir, 
pump well, and building 
foundations, also 16-inch 
cast-iron force main, Read- 
ing Extension, North Metro- 
politan System in Wakefield 
and Reading. 

Section 75, Reading Extension, 
North Metropolitan System 
in Stoneham and Wakefield. 


4 
8 

8 


$30,692 00 
70,424 00 

29,588 502 


$26,016 00 2 
70,179 002 

22,984 50 


Rendle-Stoddard 
Company, Chelsea. 

Bruno & Petitti, Bos- 
ton. 

Antony Cefalo, Bos- 
ton. 



Contracts relating to the 



145 



149 > 



Section 101, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley Extension, South 
Metropolitan System in Ded- 
ham and Needham. 

Part of Section 99, High-level 
sewer, Wellesley Extension, 
South Metropolitan System 
in Dedham. 



$90,080 00 



67,800 00 



$72,046 60 



47,675 002 



Rendle-Stoddard 
Company, Chelsea. 



John C. Cavanagh 
Company, Boston. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



239 



Appendix No. 4 



the Year 1920 — Sewerage Division. 
North Metropolitan System. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 


8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 


9. 

Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1920. 


10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1920. 




Sept. 17, 1919 
Feb. 11, 1920 

Sept. 29, 1920 


April 30, 1920 


For earth excavation and refilling in reservoir, pump 
well and building foundations, $100 per lin. ft.; for 
earth excavation and refilling in trench for 16-inch 
cast-iron force main, $4.75 per lin. ft.; for Portland 
cement brick masonry in manholes and special 
structures, $40 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement 
concrete masonry in reservoir, pump well and 
building foundations, $15 per cu. yd.; for rock ex- 
cavation in reservoir, pump well and building foun- 
dations, $8 per cu. yd. ; for rock excavation in trench 
for force main, $10 per cu. yd. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 15- 
inch, 18-inch and 20-inch Akron pipe sewer, $4.10 
per lin. ft.; for Portland cement brick masonry in 
manholes and special structures, $50 per cu. yd. ; for 
Portland cement concrete masonry in trench and 
special structures, $16 per cu. yd.; for Portland ce- 
ment boulder concrete masonry in trench, $12 per 
cu. yd.; for rock excavation in trench, $16 per cu. 

yd. 


$26,359 69 
63,641 00 

20,970 40 


1 

2 

3 



South Metropolitan System. 



Sept. 17, 1919 



Sept. 29, 1919 



May 4, 1920 3 



$39,062 02 



3,949 10 



3 Work stopped by arrangement of the Commission. 



240 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Contracts made and pending during 

Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


3 
4 


2 
3 


Section 100, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley Extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Dedham. 

Part of Section 99, High-level 
sewer, Wellesley Extension 
in Dedham. 


3 
3 


$121,659 50 
96,300 00 


$118,157 001 
88,237 50 1 


Bruno & Petitti, Bos- 
ton. 

Rendle-Stoddard 
Company, Chelsea. 



Contract based upon this bid. 



1921.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



241 



the Year 1920 — Sewerage Division — Continued. 
South Metropolitan System — Concluded. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1920. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1920. 



May 19, 1920 



May 29, 1920 



For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 33- 
inch by 36-inch concrete sewer, $17 per lin. ft.; for 
Portland cement brick masonry in manholes and 
special structures, $40 per cu. yd.; for Portland ce- 
ment concrete masonry in trench and special struc- 
tures, $18 per cu. yd. ; for rock excavation in trench, 
$10 per cu. yd. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 33- 
inch by 36-inch concrete sewer and 30-inch cast-iron 
pipe, $46.50 per lin. ft.; for Portland cement brick 
masonry in manholes and special structures, $40 per 
cu. yd.; for Portland cement concrete masonry in 
trench and special structures, $21.50 per cu. yd.; for 
spruce piles in trench and river bed in place, $2 per 
lin. ft. ; for rock excavation in trench, $9 per cu. yd. 



$105,315 00 



77,542 50 



242 



METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. 



[Jan. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1920 

— Concluded. 
Summary of Contracts. 



Sewerage Division, 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1920. 



North Metropolitan System, 3 contracts, 

South Metropolitan System, 4 contracts, 

Total of 7 contracts made and pending during the year 1920, 



$110,971 09 
225,868 62 



$336,839 71 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 243 



Appendix No. 5. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL COURT 

ON JANUARY 10, 1921. 

The Metropolitan District Commissioner respectfully presents the 
following abstract of the account of the receipts, expenditures, dis- 
bursements, assets and liabilities of the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Works for the year ending November 30, 1920, in accord- 
ance with the provisions of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 1906. 

Metropolitan Water Works. 

Construction. 

The loans authorized for expenditures under the Metropolitan Water 
acts, the receipts which are added to the loan fund, the expenditures 
for the construction and acquisition of works, and the balance avail- 
able on December 1, 1920, have been as follows: — 

Loans authorized under the Metropolitan Water acts, including 
appropriations under St. 1920, c. 530, to provide for the 
reinforcement of the low-service and the northern high- 
service pipe lines, the construction of a reservoir in Arlington 
for the northern extra high service, to provide additional 
pumping machinery for the northern high service at Spot 
Pond and the southern high service at Chestnut Hill pump- 
ing stations, . . . . $45,685,000 00 

Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to Metro- 
politan Water District, paid into Loan Fund (St. 1909, 
c. 320), 90,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property which are placed to the 
credit of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1920, . $5,717 46 
For the period prior to December 1, 1919, . 258,898 67 

264,616 13 



$46,039,616 13 



244 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 

Amount approved for payment from the Metropolitan Water 
Loan Fund : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1920, . $39,256 93 
For the period prior to December 1, 1919, . 43,247,502 46 

$43,286,759 39 



Balance December 1, 1920, $2,752,856 74 

The amount of the Metropolitan Water Loan bonds issued at the 
end of the fiscal year was $42,947,000, bonds to the amount of $34,000 
having been issued during the year. Of the total amount issued, 
$41,398,000 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, amounting 
to $1,549,000, were issued as serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of outstanding bonds was $42,- 
726,000, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount of 
*22 1,000 had been paid. During the fiscal year $43,000 in serial 
bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund amounted on December 
1, 1920, to $16,953,165.15, an increase during the year of $1,048,620.01. 

Maintenance. 

Amount appropriated for the maintenance and 
operation of works for the year ending Novem- 
ber 30, 1920, $815,683 52 

Receipts credited to this fund for the year ending 

November 30, 1920, 3,828 84 

— — — $819,512 36 

Amount approved for maintenance and operation 
of works during the year ending November 30, 
1920, $789,696 32 

Deduct amount paid from appropriation for the 
year 1919, ... \ 21,185 75 

768,510 57 



Balance December 1, 1920, $51,001 79 

The Commission has also received during the year ending November 
30, 1920, $107,200.93 from rentals, the sale of land, land products and 
power and from other proceeds from the operations of the Metro- 
politan Water Works which, according to section 18 of the Metro- 
politan Water Act, are applied by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth 
to the payment of interest on the Metropolitan Water Loan, to sinking 
fund requirements and expenses of maintenance and operation of 
works, in reduction of the amount to be assessed upon the Metro- 
politan Water District for the year. 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 245 

Sums received from sales of water to municipalities not belonging to 
the District and to water companies, and from municipalities for ad- 
mission to the District, have been applied as follows: — 

For the period prior to December 1, 1906, distributed to the cities 
and towns of the District, as provided by section 3 of the Metro- 
politan Water Act, $219,865 65 

For the period beginning December 1, 1906, and prior to Decem- 
ber 1, 1919, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking 
Fund, as provided by chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907, . . 98,427 94 

For the year beginning December 1, 1919, and ending November 
30, 1920, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 
as provided b}^ said last-named act s . . . . . . 7,847 45 



$326,141 04 



Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 

Construction. 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature for 
the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the receipts 
which are added to the proceeds of the loans, and the expenditures for 
construction, are given below, as follows: — 

North Metropolitan System. 
Loans authorized for expenditures for con- 
struction under the various acts, including 
those for the Revere, Belmont and Maiden 
extensions, North System enlargements and 
extensions, New Mystic sewer, Deer Island 
outfall extension, lowering sewer siphon 
under Maiden river, balance of appropria- 
tion under chapter 76, Resolves of 1915, and 
for the Reading extension, .... $7,512,365 73 
Receipts from sales of real estate and from 
miscellaneous sources, which are placed to 
the credit of the North Metropolitan Sys- 
tem: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1920, 919 57 

For the period prior to December 1, 1919, 86,083 14 

— $7,599,386 44 



Amount approved for payment from the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, North 
System : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1920, $104,703 37 

For the period prior to December 1, 1919, 7,428,564 92 



7,533,268 29 
Balance December 1, 1920, $66,100 15 



246 METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION. [Jan. 



South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized for expenditures for con- 
struction under the various acts, applied to 
the construction of the Charles River valley 
sewer, Neponset valley sewer, High-level 
sewer and extensions (including Wellesley 
branch), and an additional appropriation 
authorized by St. 1920, c. 525, and for addi- 
tional Ward Street station pumping plant, . $9,912,046 27 

Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and 
from miscellaneous sources, which are placed 
to the credit of the South Metropolitan 
System : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1920, 196 40 

For the period prior to December 1, 1919, 19,684 65 

$9,931,927 32 



Amount approved for payment from the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, South 
System : — 

On account of the Charles River valley 

sewer, ....... $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset valley sewer, 911,531 46 

On account of the High-level sewer and 
extensions : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1920, 160,000 46 

For the period prior to December 1, 

1919, 7,879,150 83 



9,750,729 02 
Balance December 1, 1920, . . . . $181,198 30 

The amount of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan bonds issued at the 
end of the fiscal year was $17,311,412, bonds to the amount of $225,- 
000 for the South System having been issued during the year. Of the 
total amount issued, $15,440,912 were sinking fund bonds, and the 
remainder, amounting to $1,870,500, were serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was 
$17,066,912, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount 
of 853,500 had been paid during the year, $244,500 having been paid 
to December 1, 1920. 

Of the total amount outstanding at the end of the year, $7,334,000 
were issued for the North Metropolitan System and $9,732,912 for the 
South Metropolitan System. The Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Sink- 



1921.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 247 

ing Fund amounted on December 1, 1920, to $5,168,524.03, of which 
$3,221,141.35 was on account of the North Metropolitan System and 
$1,947,382.68 was on account of the South Metropolitan System, an 
increase during the year of $472,950.96. 

The net debt on December 1, 1920, was $11,898,387.97, a decrease 
of $301,450.96. 

Included in the above figures for the North Metropolitan System is 
$925,500 in serial bonds, of which $154,500 has been paid, and $945,000 
for the South Metropolitan System, of which $90,000 has been paid. 

Maintenance. 

North Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1920, . . . $292,576 56 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, which are re- 
turned to the appropriation : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1920, 520 67 



Amount approved for maintenance and operation of 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works, North System: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1920, . . $294,640 63 

Deduct amount paid from appropriation for the 

year 1919, . . . . 7,930 98 



$293,097 23 



-^—— 286,709 65 

Balance December 1, 1920, $6,387 58 

South Metropolitan System. 
Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1920, . . . $182,603 02 
Receipts from sales of property, reimbursement and for pumping, 
which are returned to the appropriation : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1920, . . . . . 354 66 



Amount approved for maintenance and operation of 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works, South System : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1920, . . $177,68149 

Deduct amount paid from appropriation for the 

year 1919, . 3,254 25 



$182,957 68 



174,427 24 

Balance December 1, 1920, $8,530 44